OT Eye Floaters

    I, like most people, get the occasional eye floater. I usually just ignore them and eventually they go away. But I've got one now that's
right in the center of my vision. It tracks along with the movement of my eye as I read a line of text. Does anyone have a remedy to get one of these things to move out of the way?     I mean, are they little blood clots? If so, blood has iron atoms in it, right? Would a strong magnet held to the side of your eye tend to make it move toward the magnet? Or can I turn my head sideways and spin around in my computer chair to sort of act like a centrifuge and make it move off the center of my vision? LOL
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BottleBob
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I would check this out. 18 years ago I had a big what I thought was floater and even my family doctor told me to wait till it goes away. One day I almost lost all my vision in this eye so I went to emergency room and I had a surgery next day. It turned out to be retina detachment which in turn was a sign of another problem I will not even get into. Now every year I go and get laser surgery on that eye to kill blood vessels feeding some tiny tumors that caused the detachment. In your case it may be nothing but I would make sure. Jerry

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Eyes are nothing to fool around with unless you don't mind losing them.
Go to an ophthalmologists and have it looked at. At our age it can't hurt, if nothing else you will create a baseline to compare with in the future.
Tom
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No, I don't but I used to get a floater that looked like eyeglasses on a wreathed handle. Been a few years since I last saw it but I found it to be a bit freaky.
Wes
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Bob,
I would probably get it checked by a professional.
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Just do a half a hit next time?
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vinny wrote:

Vinny:
    There's always a joker in the deck. LOL
    I haven't done ANY clandestine controlled substances since '89. To all those with the suggestions that I seek professional help for the problem, thanks for your concern - one and all.     And luckily no, Unka' George, I'm not diabetic.
    It seems to have moved off the center of my vision.
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BottleBob
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On Fri, 05 Sep 2008 15:33:20 -0700, BottleBob

==========As several people have suggested you need to get this checked soon by a qualified professional as these can be symptoms of more serious conditions, a common one being diabetes.
for some background info click on http://www.stlukeseye.com/Conditions/Floaters.asp http://www.rootatlas.com/wordpress/video/470/asteroid-hyalosis / for about 12k hits google on <floaters asteroids eye>
There are also some non surgical "cures" advertised, but I don't know how effective these are. http://www.cure-floaters.com / http://www.allaboutvision.com/conditions/spotsfloats.htm?gclid=CKyRha_6xZUCFRcOIgodUgPIjA
There is a surgical procedure that removes these, but it is seldom done, and it has long recovery time with the patient immobilized in a head bent forward position.
The reason I know about this is I just had cataract surgery, which sometimes aggravates this condition [it was pre-existing]. It is much worse in my right eye and not noticeable in the left. Unfortunatly I am "right eyed," and this causes problems with my "sight picture."
Good luck.
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BottleBob wrote:

Yeah, welcome to old age!

I don't think hemoglobin is magnetic, as the iron is bound in a molecule. I'd suspect you'd really feel your veins pulling when in an MRI machine if it was. Or can I turn my head sideways and

Not likely to have enough density difference for this to work.
I had a giant one appear in one eye some years ago, and I just had to wait for it to go away. It was not right in the center of the visual field, and was most annoying when driving, as the flat color of the sky made it more visible. It took about two weeks to fully move out of sight.
Jon
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Bob,
Could be a sign of a detached retina. My mother had a similar thing happen and lost nearly all her vision in that eye. If you have seen flashes of light or lots of sudden spots that is a sign of a detaching retina and you need to hustle on over to an opthomologist right away.
I have a lot of floaters in one eye that sustained an injury when I was a kid. The inside of my eyeball ruptured and filled with blood. I guess the floaters are just leftover bits of ruptured blood vessels. I've been told by several doctors that there isn't anything that can be done for it. They are basically trapped in the fluid inside your eye. Some may go away but as you get older you just get more of them anyhow.
--

Dan

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BottleBob wrote:

An ophthalmologist is a medical doctor. An optometrist is nothing of the sort, is merely a doctor of glasses, at best.
I highly suggest seeing an eye doctor, not a glasses doctor.
--
Black Dragon

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Here's a scary story for you then:
About ten years ago on Labor Day in fact, I was doing some projects around the house and sent my wife down to Home Depot to get something I needed. While she's there without me she figures it would be the perfect time to buy new storm doors for the house. The ones we had were fine, she just didn't like the style, hence the perfect time to buy them being there without me.
So she recruits the lot boy to rig these bad boys to the roof of her car. They used everything from rope to tape to bungee cords. Anyway, we're in the driveway, her on one side of the car and me on the other, trying to undo all the crazy rigging and I can't get one of the bungee cords unclipped from the rain gutter. I finally get the hook free and it rips through my hand. Ouch. I check out the gash across my palm and decide that I'll probably live and I notice my wife is gone. I run around to the other side of the car and she is bent over with one hand over her eye. There's blood pouring out from in between her fingers. It looks bad. I can't get her to let me see her eye and I'm not so sure I want to see it.
It turns out the hook hit her just below the eye. She needed stitches, then they sent us to an opthomologist because her vision was affected. It turned out her eye was badly bruised but was otherwise OK. They gave her a pirate patch and sent us on our way.
On a follow up exam they took her eye pressures and they were off the charts. She had undiagnosed Glaucoma. She would surely be blind today if it hadn't been caught early. As it is even under treatment, she loses a little bit of sight every year. The accident saved her sight.
The joke nowadays is that I tell her to be nice to me or I'll dress her funny when she goes blind.

Opthomologist is what you want. An optometrist makes eyeglasses and really isn't qualified to diagnose let alone treat eye diseases/conditions.

I'm telling you if you've recently seen flashing light, stars, or spots get going. don't wait.
OTOH nearsightedness leads to more floaters.
--

Dan

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D Murphy wrote:

Dan:
    Certainly a silver lining in THAT cloud.

    She probably doesn't think that's quite as funny as you do.

    Opticians make eyeglasses. See my reply to BD.

    No, nothing flashing, no stars.
    I've had those tests with the little puff of air in your eyes to check for glaucoma, that drives me nuts.

    I've heard that.
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She has a dark sense of humor.
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Dan

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wrote:

Must be a while since you've had that done, or you're having an optometrist do it. Some of them can't afford, or just don't want to spend the cash to get the new equipment.
I have Glaucoma, and have my pressure checked about every 2 months. My Ophthalmologist uses a contraption that has a probe that presses against my eyeball to check pressure.
The Glaucoma was discovered about 5 years ago by an Optometrist. I, too, had been seeing some floaters. I also started having trouble focusing at times (at first I thought I was finally getting those Flashbacks they promised me!), along with an occasional mild headache.
Went to see an Optometrist. First thing he did was check my pressure, and found that it was over 30 in each eye. He asked if I had insurance, took my card and got me a referral to an Ophthalmologist.
I have been using eye drops, one drop in each eye every evening, to keep the pressure down - until last week. But I'll explain that in my reply to Dan.

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D Murphy wrote:

That sure would have scared the crap out of me though nice to have an upside to it..
Ok, I'll relate one sorta similar. Years ago I was out fishing. I'm not a skilled fisherman, I either do really well, or I lose all sorts of tackle and get nothing. This day I'd lost several lures, snagged on underwater branches and crap.
Along this creek, I saw a nice large pool downstream, and decided to cast into it over the shallow rapids. Set up with a bright fluorescent orange MEPS lure and let loose. Nice long cast, I was very happy until I saw I'd done too well and the lure hit some low hanging branches. Shit. Started gently reeling in, and sure enough, snagged but good. Pissed off as hell, I point the rod straight at the tree and reel in all the slack, then hauled back HARD. I see the line just floating lazily in the air and assumed it had broken.
To this day, I maintain I never consciously saw anything, I just remember ducking my head slightly before getting smacked in the face with the lure. Buried two of the three hooks but good in my left eyebrow. Had I not ducked, it would have hit the eye or maybe just below.
It was fun sitting in the ER waiting room with a bright orange lure dangling over my left eye. Didn't take long for hospital workers to slowly approach from the hall, take a quick look at me, and walk away quickly, not being too good at hiding their smirks.
Two good things came of it. The ER doc showed me how to remove buried hooks by sliding a hypo needle down along the shank and over the barb, allowing it to be removed easily.
The other was the kid in the ER with a broken arm. He was whining and whimpering until he saw me with the lure stuck to my face. He stopped, stared, then asked in a hushed voice: "Does it hurt???" He didn't make another sound the whole time I was there.
Jon
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Yikes that was close. I've got to believe more than one eyeball has been hooked over the years.
That story reminds me of the time my father caught a fiesty fish on a large Rapala. When he was removing the hooks the fish got away from him and next thing you know he was hooked through both hands. The treble hooks were buried into his hands. I was a kid at the time. I could tell my mother was concerned but trying hard not to laugh as we drove to the doctor. Our "country" doctor went out to the barn, got a pair of rusty side cutters and clipped the hooks, then pulled them through.
We laugh about it today but I'm sure it hurt like hell at the time.
--

Dan

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D Murphy wrote:

That's what I assumed the ER doc would do, and I'll bet it does hurt! The hypo needle over the barb is a real neat trick. He gave me a needle to put in my tackle box in case it ever happened again, but that was one lesson I didn't need to repeat. Lures are cheap compared to an ER visit....
Jon
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Dan,
I have Open-Angle Glaucoma. Had it for about 5 years now. I, too, am gradually loosing my sight. Although, my doctor has been trying different drugs and things have been pretty stable for the last couple of years. So far, it can still be controlled with eye drops.
Don't know if you've heard about this or not, but there's a new drug called Anecortave Acetate, that's now in the testing stages.
I have been asked by my doctor to participate in a clinical study of this new drug. This drug is supposed to be similar to the Travatan Z drops that I now use, only they inject it under the outer layer of skin in the white part of the eye. It's already been tried on patients with uncontrolled glaucoma (thinking they had nothing to loose), and apparently they've had good results.
They feel that with these injections, Open-Angle Glaucoma patients may be able to discontinue the daily drops and possibly go up to 1 YEAR on a single injection. Way cool! The drops are a PITA.
My Ophthalmologist has been involved in Glaucoma research for the last 12 years, and is conducting this study under the supervision of Alcon Research, Ltd., makers of Travatan Z. http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/99908.php
I went through the preliminary tests this past Thursday (check pressure, visual field, & retinal scan). My doctor has taken me off the drops for the next 4 weeks. After this "wash-out" period, I'll have to go back for the Eligibility 1 Visit. If I still meet their requirements, I'll have to go back in one week for the Eligibility 2 visit. The only bad part about all these tests is getting my eyes dilated, and walking around in a daze for about 5 hours. I get to be the Rasta Machinist, walking around the shop wearing sun glasses!
If I still fall within the parameters for this study after the second eligibility visit, my name gets thrown into a hat to see if I get the 24 mg, 48 mg, 60 mg injection, or if I get the placebo (water). Guess they need to prove that the presence of a 'liquid' in that part of the eye won't have any effect on the IOP.
Not too excited about going for so long without my drops, cause I really don't want to do any more damage to my retina. And I really hope they don't make the poor sap who gets the placebo go for the entire length of the study (12 mos.) without treatment (drops), but this doctor seems to know what he's doing, so......... what the heck. I may be able to people like your wife who've been going through what I have for the last 5 years.
It's not like having to put these drops in every night is *that* big of a deal, but I constantly forget. You know, work too many hours, go home, fall asleep on the couch, get up at 2am and go to bed, and never even think about those damn drops. And it would be really nice not to have to go to the doctor 8 times (or more) per year.
Matt
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Dan,
I have Open-Angle Glaucoma. Had it for about 5 years now. I, too, am gradually loosing my sight. Although, my doctor has been trying different drugs and things have been pretty stable for the last couple of years. So far, it can still be controlled with eye drops.
Don't know if you've heard about this or not, but there's a new drug called Anecortave Acetate, that's now in the testing stages.
I have been asked by my doctor to participate in a clinical study of this new drug. This drug is supposed to be similar to the Travatan Z drops that I now use, only they inject it under the outer layer of skin in the white part of the eye. It's already been tried on patients with uncontrolled glaucoma (thinking they had nothing to loose), and apparently they've had good results.
They feel that with these injections, Open-Angle Glaucoma patients may be able to discontinue the daily drops and possibly go up to 1 YEAR on a single injection. Way cool! The drops are a PITA.
My Ophthalmologist has been involved in Glaucoma research for the last 12 years, and is conducting this study under the supervision of Alcon Research, Ltd., makers of Travatan Z. http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/99908.php
I went through the preliminary tests this past Thursday (check pressure, visual field, & retinal scan). My doctor has taken me off the drops for the next 4 weeks. After this "wash-out" period, I'll have to go back for the Eligibility 1 Visit. If I still meet their requirements, I'll have to go back in one week for the Eligibility 2 visit. The only bad part about all these tests is getting my eyes dilated, and walking around in a daze for about 5 hours. I get to be the Rasta Machinist, walking around the shop wearing sun glasses!
If I still fall within the parameters for this study after the second eligibility visit, my name gets thrown into a hat to see if I get the 24 mg, 48 mg, 60 mg injection, or if I get the placebo (water). Guess they need to prove that the presence of a 'liquid' in that part of the eye won't have any effect on the IOP.
Not too excited about going for so long without my drops, cause I really don't want to do any more damage to my retina. And I really hope they don't make the poor sap who gets the placebo go for the entire length of the study (12 mos.) without treatment (drops), but this doctor seems to know what he's doing, so......... what the heck. I may be able to people like your wife who've been going through what I have for the last 5 years.
It's not like having to put these drops in every night is *that* big of a deal, but I constantly forget. You know, work too many hours, go home, fall asleep on the couch, get up at 2am and go to bed, and never even think about those damn drops. And it would be really nice not to have to go to the doctor 8 times (or more) per year.
========================================== WARNING to Bottle: Make sure you have a bucket nearby, in case you upchuck after reading this..... :)
Not saying don't see/listen to yer docs, and I'm certainly no 'spert on glaucoma, but there are a wealth of hits on google for natural remedies (I googled glaucoma vitamin therapy), most of which should be implemented *anyway*, in some measure.
Wiki gives a list of potentially useful natural substances, as does http://www.naturaltherapycenter.com/main.php?name=index_bbe0cad9 .
The site claims a reduction of pressure of 20-80% with just vit C, altho the doses can be very large.
Now, Vits are certainly not a cure-all. BUT, **to the extent that you may be unwittingly or subclinically *deficient* in one or some vits/mins**, "curing" that deficiency is but a pill away, and indeed is then, defacto, The Cure for the deficiency-induced symptoms.
I can tell you first, second, and third hand, that most people are deficient in several vits/mins/EFA's, with lab values, while not being statistical fiction, still being quite un-revealing ito specific requirements, for sundry reasons. Another discussion as to how one can actually verify this for themselves.
And, the manifestations of deficiencies, while pretty well documented, can still be unpredictable.
To the extent that the damage pf glaucoma is neural in origin, the new spate "brain specials" on PBS (change your brain), and the diet/behavior recommendations therein, might have direct effect on this as well.
The MD hosting this series (actually stumping for PBS) seems grounded/orthodox enough, and strongly recommends fish oils, exercise, total elimination of *diet sodas* (all sodas, imo), etc. Claims to be able to literally see improvements in his brain scans.
Much of this is echoed elsewhere as well.
The wiki article seems very good, and, uh, quite opened my eyes. They distinguish between causal effects and correlative effects (such as systemic hbp), and note that a sig. fraction of glaucoma (the actual damage to optic nerve/retina) is not associated with intraocular pressure--iow, high pressure is not a guarantee to get it, and normal pressure is not a guarantee to not get it. Some of the demographics of glaucoma are stunning--pity the Inuits.
My philosophy is, listen to yer doc, esp. with stuff as serious as this, but don't dismiss moonbeam stuff either, cuz weird shit (good shit) often happens. The name of the game is experimentation, hopefully guided/intelligent experimentation. It is unfortunate that so often the victim has to be their own advocate and researcher.
Last but not least, and some here will really gag on this one, but the exercise mentioned above is indeed a profound medicine-- it is the biomechanical window into our biochemical innards.
For example, above and beyond all the infomercial hype and bullshit, of all the strategies to improve brain function/delay brain deterioration (incl alzheimers), plain ole exercise is now being seen to be at the very top. The implication being that it could--and likely does--help with a bevy of neurological symptoms.
Strange and unexpected shit happens with exercise (real exercise, not the infomercial bull), almost all of it good to extraordinary--barring bad knees, backs, etc-- and there are workarounds for those.
In my case, simple running and weight lifting (and of course my effing HoloBarre) has *eclipsed* all the medically supervised bullshit rehab for my broke neck and the attendant nerve damage.
In fact, in but a few months after the accident, I was already up and able, ready to kick BD's effing ass. But alass, gas was too expensive even then, from Rochester to Yonkers....
In regards to fluid balance in the eye, a kind of biomechanical phenom, exercise quite forces the body into restorative fluid balance, in a number of systems, from the exocrine, endocrine, hormonal, lymphatic, as well as traditional circulation, and in major organs, from the kidneys to the skin.
It is thus not a stretch at all for the eyes to be involved in this. I know of one individual with non-functioning tear ducts, dependent on drops, with progressive damage to the cornea, who became normalized after simple running!
Sincere good luck with this--really a pita, that I hope works out for the best.
--
PV'd as usual, but not feeling so bad about it right now....







Matt



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