quick poll - american cars



My 4WD Ranger and AWD CRV both get ~25 normally, 28 with care on a longer trip in summer, barely 20 in mid winter. Consecutive measurements by filling the tank full vary by generally less than 2 MPG.
jsw
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wrote:

Which engine?
Gunner
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2.0l 145 HP in the CRV, 2.3l 100HP in the Ford, if I ever get it running right again. Ford no longer makes the EGR tube, the last thing keeping the valve cover on. Looks like another home-made wrench That little HP isn't for everyone but it has worked for me.
[Break to watch Gilles & Cheryl]
I've adjusted the front bearing drag on the Ford to near the minimum and keep 30PSI in the tires. If possible I get behind a truck doing 55 - 65 on the highway to gain a little drafting and not block traffic any more than the truck does. 70MPH costs 1 - 2 MPG.
jsw
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wrote:

The local phone company uses that little engine. Seems to work for them.

32 - 34 works better if you have actual truck tires.
Gunner
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No, I wouldn't. I have mostly driven Fords and have 65 Ford F250 and 89 F250 Diesel and 95 escort as my daily driver. Wife drives a Buick Regal. Ford has been promoting the gay life style, so I won't buy another one.
I almost bought a Chevrolet, but the plastic radiator was a real turn off. I had the plastic radiator leak only when the engine temperature was hot like climbing a hill. It wouldn't leak in the drive way, so I couldn't find the leak. Yet every time I climbed a steep hill the water would run out. I replaced the radiator and found that it blew a head gasket also. $200 for the radiator and $1600 to replace the gasket at a shop. I didn't replace the head gasket. Sold it as it was, when I found out that mechanics didn't like to work on them, because they were such a poor design. PIA they said to work on. What ever happen to the old engines that had real head bolts. When they over heated and you just let them cool off and fixed the leak and were back on the road again.
Richard W.
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Richard W. wrote:

Now that's some funny shit! LOL!!!
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More stinky car stuff floats to the top. As most of us are aware it is likely that the PBGC will have to backstop the Chrysler and GM pension plans, at least in part. The way the law reads the retirees will lose their medical/dental coverage and be forced onto Medicare [tax payer funded]. The pension benefits are also capped, and won't pay until 65, so if you took early retirement you are screwed for a few months to a few years.
The stinky part is that the PBGC funds have been "reinvested" from those nasty old Treasury notes that didn't pay much to stocks and bonds, with plans for investment in commercial and residential real estate. Always looking out for the little people....
The article does not indicate how much PBGC trust-fund money has been lost.
----- Former Pension Agency Chief Under Investigation
By ERIC LIPTON Published: May 14, 2009
The former Bush administration official in charge of the federal agency that guarantees pensions for 44 million Americans is under investigation for inappropriate contacts with Wall Street firms seeking to obtain lucrative contracts to manage part of the agencys portfolio. The former official, Charles E.F. Millard, is also being investigated for soliciting help from one of the winning firms in his search for a new job once he left office.
The allegations against Mr. Millard, the former director of the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, appear in a draft report by the agencys inspector general. Agency officials are now considering canceling contracts that Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase and BlackRock won late last year worth up to $100 million in fees over a decade to collectively manage $2.5 billion worth of the agencys $49 billion portfolio.
<snip>
The contracts were part of a broad effort Mr. Millard began shortly after he arrived at the agency in 2007 to put more of its portfolio into higher yielding stocks and alternative investments like private equity and real estate. For years, the agency had been relying on Treasury bonds that offered more predictable, but lower, returns than stocks and alternative investments.
Mr. Millard championed the new strategy as a way to reduce an $11 billion shortfall between the agencys obligations to make payments to retirees and the agencys total assets. The agency serves as a guarantee for 29,000 employer-sponsored pension plans, obligations it assumes after a company goes bankrupt, like TransWorld Airlines or Bethlehem Steel. <snip> Even before the contest over who would manage the $2.5 billion formally began, executives at JPMorgan Chase offered Mr. Millard advice on how he should craft the government document requesting bids, sketching out possible questions that the bidders would be asked perhaps giving JPMorgan an advantage as the firm prepared its proposal, the inspector generals report says. <snip> Within two weeks of the award, Mr. Millard, who stepped down from his job in January at the end of the Bush administration, also turned to one senior Goldman Sachs executive involved in the bidding for help in finding a new job.
Ur grt. Tx, Mr. Millard wrote back to the Goldman executive, after she told him that several Wall Street executives she had contacted were interested in meeting with him. Will send info soon. <snip> The investigators also found that Mr. Millard, who at the time was also a volunteer on the presidential campaign of John McCain, used his work e-mail and government telephones to repeatedly communicate with Rick Lazio, a senior executive at JPMorgan Chase and former Republican congressman from New York.
In those exchanges, they switched at times between discussing the contract bid to whether Mr. Lazio might be interested in a job in a possible McCain administration.
The report says that Mr. Millard, against the recommendation of agency staff, insisted that he be included on a three-member select committee that would vet the companies bidding to manage a piece of the pension funds. <snip> When he first arrived in Washington in 2007, Mr. Millard began an effort to modify the agencys investment strategy. He convinced the P.B.G.C.that it was stuck in the past, afraid to venture into the stock market and other alternative investment approaches like private equity and real estate that potentially paid higher returns.
Our investment policy currently is conservative in the extreme, he told a Senate committee during his 2007 confirmation hearing. I want to make sure that we are being good stewards and recognizing that the dynamism of the American economy could help increase those assets, within reason.
The change in the investment strategy, which would put 45 percent of the agencys funds into stocks, 45 percent into bonds, and 10 percent into private equities and real estate, is just getting started, with the portfolio now about 30 percent in equity, and none so far in real estate or private equities. ----- http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/15/us/politics/15pension.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&ref=us
Unka' George [George McDuffee] ------------------------------------------- He that will not apply new remedies, must expect new evils: for Time is the greatest innovator: and if Time, of course, alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), English philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Innovations" (1597-1625).
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jimz wrote:

If offered the chance to buy another new Chevy or remove my good eye with a rusty fork, I would ask:
"How rusty is that fork?"
--Winston
--

Don't *faff*, dear.

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No. My biggest issue is too many electronics. Too difficult for second party maintenance, an too expensive to maintain.
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wrote:

Fool me once shame on you, fool me twice shame on me. Losing a life long customer is the real cost of quality.
Tom
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jimz wrote:

Do you mean a NEW car? Probably not. Depending on price though, I might buy a used one. With the inferior quality of most American cars, they can usually be picked up pretty cheap. My last purchase was an '09 Toyota for my wife. It's a great car. I have a 91 chev and a 92 toyota as well, and the chevy has constant problems with about 120K on it. The toyota is approaching 300K with NO issues. I'm pretty happy with my 97 dodge truck. It needs new tie rods at only 55K though.
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sittingduck wrote:

I have an 05 Toyota Tacoma assembled in Fremont, CA. by union labor that I love.
So is that an American or a Japanese truck? I know, it's where the profit goes yada yada
Best, Steve
--


Regards,
Steve Saling
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Garlicdude wrote:

For me I have an 05 Subaru Outback and a 94 Acura Integra. Both are great cars. The Sube has 85k with no problems but a couple cracked cv boots (normal). The Acura has 190k with no real issues but normal wear and tear. Both supply jobs and work to folks here in the US as well as abroad.
I consider them American cars as they were both made here and sold at dealers here. As far as where the profit goes... do some reading about "US" companies doing work abroad. Not a lot of it stays here with the current tax loopholes. For that reason I don't care where the things made as long it is a quality product.
-- Bill
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jimz wrote:

When I was a kid, buying cars that cost less than $500, I drove only Dodges, and Plymouths. Slant-six engines and Torqueflight transmissions. The bodies rusted right off, and the brakes and electrics were always bad; but the engines and gears never quit.
In '78 I bought a brand new Chrysler. There was nothing good about it, and what they called service was nothing less than abusive. I unloaded that car the minute I could afford to, and I haven't seen the inside of a Chrysler showroom since. And I once considered Chrysler the best of the American carmakers.
Five years ago, my stepdaughter needed a first car. The plan was something cheap but sound. We found here a '95 Ford Contour. Not a bad car, overall; but the one time we needed real service (replacing the water pump requires removing the engine, which is why I didn't do it myself), I was reminded of how awful, dishonest, and incompetent, a service department can be.
Since I bought my first Toyota (a used truck in 1981), I've put over 600,000 miles on five Toyota's. Three trucks and two cars. The total cost, including fuel, maintenance, repairs, and resale, has been so cheap that friends who own Fords and Chevy's think I'm lying. And I've NEVER had a problem or complaint with service at any Toyota dealership.
My current truck is an '03 Tacoma with 71,000 miles, and I still refer to it as my "new" truck. I drove my last Camry for nine years, and 186,000 miles. My wife's on her third Camry, since I talked her into giving up Chevy's. Three cars, 320,000 miles, zero trouble, and very low total cost.
I'd love to buy an American car; but I'd be ashamed to spend American dollars on something that's just not good enough, economically, at the gas pump, or on the road.
KG
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Yes always have- FORD (who's not in trouble?) NEVER a rice burner! I'm an American & if I have a choice I will buy American even if I have to pay more.
===================================================== ______ /_____/\ Best Regards, /____ \\ \ Gil Pawl /_____\ \\ / HOLDZEM /_____/ \/ / / /_____/ / \//\ West Chicago, IL \_____\//\ / / USA \_____/ / /\ / \_____/ \\ \ \_____\ \\ \_____\/ ======================================================
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Yes.
The entire car industry is about to undergo a revolution and companies like this will lead the way:
www.aptera.com/
Jon Banquer San Diego, CA
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On Thu, 7 May 2009 21:17:48 -0700 (PDT), jon_banquer

Red Flag when a company can't answer consumer questions regarding their products design features, cost & performance, all for an automobile that was supposed to begin limited production last year and ramp up to full production this year.
http://www.aptera.com/faqs.php [May 7th, 2009]
Q) When are you starting production and when will you begin delivery? (For reservation holders, we are receiving a lot of 'When can I get my Aptera?')
A) Our goal is to release our first unit before the end of 2008. We will produce limited volumes initially and then gradually ramp-up production throughout 2009. We will provide an approximate build schedule in the future, so stay tuned.
Q) What kind of batteries are in the vehicle?
A) We will provide additional details regarding battery chemistry as we get closer to production.
Q) What is the battery life and cost replacement? A) Battery life and cost replacement depend largely on usage, but we can say they are being developed to live to a normal automotive cycle. We are unable to discuss battery cost at this point because it has a direct impact on our business model.
?????Answering a question on battery life and cost "Has a direct impact on our business model"?????
Q) How many kwhr does it take to charge? A) Depending on the amount of battery depletion, a full charge takes about eight hours on standard 110v socket. We will provide more detailed information about kwhrs when we get closer to production.
Q) What are the performance stats (top speed, acceleration, consumption rate)?
A) At this time we are not able to post hard numbers on performance, but vehicle performance will provide confident driving and acceleration in all typical driving conditions.
-- Tom http://tinyurl.com/5okkgz
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On May 7, 11:01 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Jon isn't interested in the real world. He lives in press release world.
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wrote:

The King over vapor. LOL
This is something that might have a shot and they need 450 Million dollars to do it, not 40 billion. http://www.brightautomotive.com / At least they have a geoup of industry pro's involved.
JC
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My last American vehicle was a Jeep Comanche. For the first 2 years it was a real nice truck. It seemed it had a self destruct mode when the hobbs meter read exactly 2 years and one second. And it wasn't a quick painless death either. A new piece of the truck would fail on a pretty consistent basis. Over the next year, out of warranty of course, it probably cost me an average of $300 a month in random repairs. Some of the failures I can remember: The rear view mirror just fell off the windshield at a stop light, the gear shift knob broke off in my hand, both window cranks broke. It was a 4 speed and did not have a cable for the clutch. Instead it was a hydraulic unit that would blow seals about every other month. That meant speed shifting while under way and doing powerstarts at red lights. The starter failed, that meant parking on hills so I can do a rolling start. Money was tight then so after a month of parking at the top of a hill it became a difficult habit to shake. One time the carburetor coughed some fire and some rubber ignited, I was in my driveway blowing on the flames to no avail. Luckily there was a Builders Emporium across the street, I sprinted into the store grabbing a fire extinguisher and tossing my wallet at the cashier. Shortly after that the clutch imploded on in itself and after that repair it just didn't seem right. I had to go to a Toyota dealer to pick up a part for my wife's Toyota, and a salesman said "Hey buddy wanna trade that truck in?" I didn't even have to think about it. I've been stuck on Toyota's ever since. My current truck is a '98 Tacoma and at 190,000+ it's just getting broken in. Nope, I won't buy the junk passed off as vehicles that Detroit is responsible for in this lifetime.
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