Removing roll marked material data from aluminum bar stock

All the solvents you seem to have tried are covalent-organic compounds. Perhaps it will respond to an ionic solvent... like water! Its called the
universal solvent for a reason!
Rarius

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Just out of interest - what are the main groups of solvents and their useful properties.
Polar - water
Non polar ? Acetone, naphtha, alcohol, WD-40, Berryman B-12, brake fluid???
Others as per Barts "Hot melt glue removal (tip of the day)"
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There's a range. Acetone is also polar, no hydrogen bonding (hydrogen only on carbon), alchohol is slightly less polar, has OH- groups, will hydrogen bond. WD-40 is aliphatic (no double bonds) straight chain hydrocarbon which is non-polar, B-12 has aromatic (double bonds and cyclic) iirc, including toluene, etc. Brake fluid is probably polar, maybe a glycol with lots of OH- groups since it should be miscible with water.
They all have different uses as solvents depending upon what you're trying to dissolve, as you're most likely aware.
Pete Keillor
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What is B-12?
I thought WD40 was jut kerosene, at about 50x the price.
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Mr. PV'd

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And what reason would that be?? Even you just characterized water as an ionic solvent.
DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide) is considered to be the "universal solvent" from a pure chemical pov, and even that is just a hyperbole that chemists indulge in, acknowledging that it does dissolve more stuff than other solvents.
Someone mentioned alcohols. These are inneresting because you can "tailor" their solvent properties by smoothly varying the number of carbons *and* the geometry of said carbons, as well as the number of -OHs.
With single OHs, past 4 or 5 carbons (butanol, pentanol), alcohols dramatically drop in miscibility with water, at 8 carbons (octanol), it starts becoming greasy. Methanol would of course be the most water like.
Ditto the "fatty acids", with the shortest (formic and acetic (vinegar) ) being decidedly good polar solvents, with the same pattern as the alcohols, and the mid-length and longer ones being what you eat -- olive oil, lard, etc.
The vegetable oils are surprisingly good solvents for really miserable shop-grease, superior to dishwashing liquid in a number of cases, and proly close to the industrial GoJo type stuff. Slower in their action, but really good, depending on the grease at hand.
You read pretty often this "universal solvent" bidniss about water, but I think it is a mis-appropriation of the idea that water seems to be universally required for life -- at least life as we know it. And, there might be some gray areas, even there.
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Mr. PV'd

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wrote:

The only true universal solvent is spit, specifically that of your mother.
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On Thu, 05 Feb 2009 11:55:10 -0800, Jon Anderson

My son told me about aluminum from McMaster Carr that he uses and the only solvent he's found that works is laquer thinner. ERS
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snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

The one solvent I don't have on hand.... I'll pick up a can next time I'm in town and give it a try.
Thanks,
Jon
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