[Shameless Plug] A New Book

Fred Bloggs wrote:


Hey, today it's ranked at 32000 in books. Yesterday it was 540000. At this time tomorrow it'll be better than 200000 books that haven't even been written yet :-).
Apparently you're as much of a tightwad as me. I did discuss the pricing with my editor -- she was pretty adamant that it was the right price. Besides, you get a CD with code that not only illustrates cool functionality, but it compiles, it runs, and it's been tested & debugged. That's gotta be worth several hundred pages right there, eh?
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
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Tim Wescott wrote:

Is that Simulink code or something? I bought the Drusinsky book on sale, but if it turns into a pos, right back to Newnes it goes.
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Fred Bloggs wrote:

Or something -- I used SciLab to do the design exercises in the book. SciLab is a free MatLab replacement. In many ways it's better than MatLab, although it does fall down when you start trying to edit it's block diagrams (I really need to convince the SciLab team to do something about that).
There's three classes of stuff on the CD: A SciLab install, SciLab code that generates many of the figures in the book, and incidentally provides examples of using SciLab, and a bunch of C code from chapters 9 and 10. The C code from chapter 9 is sample code for implementing swept-sine frequency response measurements from within the controller. The C code from chapter 10 is a set of code for implementing fractional arithmetic, plus a set of useful control system blocks implemented for integer arithmetic, fractional arithmetic, and floating point arithmetic. One could take my sample code and use it as library code for the core of a controller.
Jerry mentioned looking at other things I've written -- if you look at my website you'll see many articles which directly contributed to the book. "Z Transforms for the Embedded System Engineer" became the seed from which the z transforms chapter and the design chapter grew. "Measuring Frequency Response" produced the chapter on measuring frequency response. "Using Block Diagrams in Control System Design" grew into the block diagrams chapter. "Controlling Motors in the Presence of Friction and Backlash" is in the "Nonlinear Control" chapter, along with a bunch of other stuff.
There isn't a word in there that's lifted from "PID Without a PhD", but I did make darn sure that the design chapter covered PID design.
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
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You guys really are tight wads. If you take even one idea from a book, it is a bargain. I just got back from CA where Tim's book was released. I usually buy at least one book every time I travel to Silicon Valley or San Franscisco. One year I spent $900 on 9 books.
I am happy to report that I have helped Tim move up the best sellers list. I have an autographed first edition and printing of Tim's book. Someday, when Tim is even more famous, I will sell it for a huge profit.
For the moment, we can all be content that we are helping Tim with his Porsche payments. I'm sure we will all see him on late night TV soon.
My suggestion to everyone is, buy Tim's book. You'll be able to tell everyone, you know a famous author! If you also buy Rick Lyon's book, you will know at least two famous authors. This will probably make you very popular and some of you will now be able to date beautiful women that you couldn't even talk to before.
--
Al Clark
Danville Signal Processing, Inc.
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Al Clark wrote:

LOL. It's not quite as lucrative as all that. I calculate that if I write another two books (not counting the one that's in edit right now) and all of them continue to sell at the rate of the first one, the quarterly royalties will cover my rent. That's about six years' work, by the way.

Merely being an engineer is the ultimate sexual stimulant to all the members of the opposite sex that any engineer ought to care about. If I may quote from the introduction to my third book (and I think I may):
"Both online and in real life, almost every day I see people asking what they need to do in order to become embedded engineers. Some are new graduates, some are still college students, a few are teenagers in high school, and a large minority are hobbyists, hardware technicians or application-level programmers looking to improve their salary prospects and/or diversify their skills in order to avoid the twenty-first century plague of white-collar commoditization.
Why do so many people want to become embedded gurus? The obvious explanation is that young (and not-so-young) programmers and technicians are being lured by the glamorous, high-profile work, easy conditions, relaxed lifestyle and limitless wealth, delivered by adoring crowds, that only embedded engineering can provide. Since none of that last sentence is remotely true, however (I've been working in the field full-time for somewhat more than ten years, and I don't clearly recall the last time I was pelted with cash by an adoring crowd), I can only assume that there is some major marketing campaign in progress and it is drawing people to the embedded field.
This, of course, leads to an intractable moral dilemma. Should existing embedded engineers steer these young hopefuls towards other fields, thereby keeping the pool of fresh embedded talent small, and consulting rates correspondingly lucrative? Or, should we beckon these poor innocents in the door to work on the bottom level, thereby pushing all us embedded guys one step up the pyramid?"
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On Sat, 08 Apr 2006 09:55:33 -0400, in sci.electronics.design Jerry

Whay on earth do embedded.com always put the diagrams as hyperlinks instead of inserting in the web page in question?
martin
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martin griffith wrote:

Perversity? It certainly is a PITA. If you check out my web site there are a number of articles that _aren't_ linked to embedded.com, and which put the figures in the text so you can have a chance at seeing them in the right place.
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
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Jerry Avins wrote:

Seconded.
Based on Tim's pedigree as a contributor to this group, and the quality of his discreetly mentioned website, I have already ordered his book (34.99 direct from Elsevier vs 37.95 from Amazon and 39.95 from most other sources). I'll comment on the content and vfm when I have read it, and not before.
-- Andy McC
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Belated congratulations, Tim.
Having recently done battle with a (fast) motor controller, despite a lifetime in (slow) temperature control, I'm adding your book to my wishlist ;).
Steve http://www.fivetrees.com
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Tim Wescott wrote:

http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/bookdescription.cws_home/707797/description#description
Congratulations on the birth of your new baby, Mr. Wescott. I'll see if I can get my employer to add it to the library.
'Taint no such thing as shameless for this -- feel free to beam and pass out the cigars.
Cheers Chris
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