Advantages & Disadvantage of SCADA system?



Like a mail-sorting system used by the USPS. Went around teaching all the regional offices how to startup/use the machine, it included a PC interface.
First thing one guy did was 'prove' how unreliable it was by hitting F2 during the boot up, go into the PC bios and screw it all up. He wanted to make the point that 'the new system let me screw it up!'
daestrom
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daestrom@NO_SPAM_HEREtwcny.rr.com says...

..which probably explains why virtually every BIOS now includes password protection. A no-cost adder that allows COTS equipment in "hostile user" (as opposed to "user hostile") environments.
--Gene
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Did it ever?

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wrote:

The solution to that is to have the automation LAN isolated and separate from the corporate LAN. That's what one of our clients has, and it works very well for them. Except for the ABB Advant Unix boxes, all of the automation PC's run Windows and their specific app - Xterminals, DeltaV, Wonderware or iFix. There are also several Windows PC's on the corporate LAN in the control rooms, and everyone has an account on the domain. These are used for email, online training, record keeping, and the other usual stuff.
Mike
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Baddly designed or just old SCADA systems can be vulnerable to cyberwarefare/cyberterrorism attacks, no matter if they use TCP/IP or not. A modern well designed SCADA system based on TCP/IP protocols can be safer than many older systems bacause uf the use of modern data encryption and authentication tools. That are many old system nowadays in use that have quite poor security on their communications. There are many systems in use that use radio communications with a protocol that does not use any ancryption or reliable authentication. You just need a suitable radio and modem to be able to control the devices on the field (you need to get to know the used protocol and device addresses). Not very secure.
--
Tomi Engdahl (http://www.iki.fi/then /)
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writes:

For office IT networks, sure, but how many hackers would even know what an Industrial Ethernet packet looked like, let alone how to manipulate it to their own purposes? It would look like garbled rubbish to them even if unencrypted and unauthenticated.

Tomi, I think you've been watching too many movies..
I, for one, am not convinced that hacking into a radio network is as easy as you say. You certainly need more than a radio and a modem. For starters, you need to know: 1. The frequency band and specific frequencies in use and hope it doesn't use spread-spectrum. 2. What brand/model of equipment is installed to know which protocols are supported. 3. The configuration and addressing used on the network. 4. The configuration and routing for the field devices (I/O numbering, etc.)
Jamming it is easy - but then most radio-based systems would have some kind of hard-wired fallback (eg. leased-line), so that won't do much except ring alarm bells.
Even as the *designer* of many such systems, I'm not sure I could "hack in" unless I had deliberately left a back door open somewhere and then later remembered to document it someplace.
Cameron:-)
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Hello
Could yu reccomend me for drinking water scada a radio modem pls? what do you recommend me half-duplex or full-duplex ?
Do you know the best one ?
thank you
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zarlino wrote:

You might as well ask about what kind of car is "best." There are features a particular radio is good for. There are also costs. You haven't even mentioned on what bands this radio is supposed to operate, whether this is to be licensed or unlicensed operation, what power systems are available, how much space is required, and what the operating environment is supposed to be like.
More than that, however, you should be concerned with antenna sites, and path profiles.
I don't have an answer for you. In fact, anyone who does has no clue what you're really asking for. I recommend you consult with an engineer who has experience in this area. There are no simple answers here.
Jake Brodsky
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I know what I've used. Where I used to work we did many water and wastewater projects with radio telemetry. If we had favorable conditions, we used Microwave Data Systems radio modems for the unlicensed 928MHz spread-spectrum band. When more power was required, we used EF Johnson VHF or UHF radio modems, for which the owner had to have the frequencies licensed.
This is in the U.S. Your local rules, available products and mileage will vary.
Mike
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RsK wrote:

SCADA systems allow one to monitor and control equipment from a remote location. That's the advantage. The disadvantage is that they cost money to install and maintain, add additional system failure modes and can be a security loophole.
--
Paul Hovnanian mailto: snipped-for-privacy@Hovnanian.com
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