Bank of Batteries ?

On 24 Jul 2007, Mike Lyle wrote


Fat chance, methinks....
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng and BrEng, indiscriminately mixed
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wrote:

How did you ever get the moniker of "Prof." and what do you claim to be a professor of?
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On Jul 24, 1:39?pm, Spurious Response

Oh, dear. It seems speed reading claims another victim.
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On 24 Jul 2007, Spurious Response wrote

Try again, pookie, and see if you can figure out why a reference to somebody with the surname "Moylan" might -- just might -- not be a reference to someone who goes by the initials "HVS".
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On Tue, 24 Jul 2007 00:02:06 -0700, Spurious Response

They do. But let's look at the Duracell website:
http://www.duracell.co.uk/Shop/duracellplusaa.html
There is an image of a blister pack of 4 AA cells. The text says:
DURACELL PLUS AA BATTERIES (Pack Of 4)
Some of the people replying here are reading this thread in alt.usage.english (Peter Moylan, HVS and me, at least).
We are well aware of differences of wording between technical terminology and the common names for things.
Duracell use the common name "battery".
Consumers do not need to know the difference between a cell and a battery. They just need to buy an item with the correct label.
It is simple and straightforward for the consumer for all purchasable items of this type to be called batteries.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
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On Tue, 24 Jul 2007 11:05:00 +0100, Peter Duncanson

The correct label would be and is "Cell". If that label had been used all these decades, you and any other dope would have no problem referring to them in that manner, and your discussion here would have a completely different spin.
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On Tue, 24 Jul 2007 05:37:00 -0700, Spurious Response

The label I mean contains information such as AAA, D, PP3, Lithium, NiCd, NiMH, Silver Oxide, rechargeable, voltage, capacity, etc.
I just looked at the Batteries pages of an electronics catalogue.
In that, sometimes batteries are called cells, and sometimes cells are called batteries, but mostly they are all called batteries. This is absolutely no problem to the consumer or even to a professional.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
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On Tue, 24 Jul 2007 18:32:52 +0100, Peter Duncanson

I never stated that it was a problem. I merely stated that it was incorrect, and that is a fact.
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On Tue, 24 Jul 2007 05:37:00 -0700, Spurious Response

While deporable, it's quite evident that sellers of cells pretty much know the buying public won't understand what a blister pack of "1.5V cells" is.
--
************* DAVE HATUNEN ( snipped-for-privacy@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
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Pretty sad then, that the world cannot be educated on such a simple, easily understood premise.
In fact... I think your assertion is quite wrong.
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On Jul 24, 2:02 am, Spurious Response

Here's a sampling of dictionary definitions from onelook.com, all of which recognize the extension of the meaning of "battery" to single cells:
Compact Oxford English Dictionary: noun (pl. batteries) 1 a device containing one or more electrical cells, for use as a source of power.
Merriam-Webster: b : a group of two or more cells connected together to furnish electric current; also : a single cell that furnishes electric current <a flashlight battery>
Cambridge online: a device that produces electricity to provide power for radios, cars, etc:
American Heritage Dictionary: 6. Electricity a. Two or more connected cells that produce a direct current by converting chemical energy to electrical energy. b. A single cell, such as a dry cell, that produces an electric current.
You may have your own convention, of course, but but convening with yourself is just Oneanonlyism. -- John
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OED:
10. a. _Galvanism_. An apparatus consisting of a series of cells, each containing the essentials for producing voltaic electricity, connected together. Also used of any such apparatus for producing voltaic electricity, whether of one cell or more.
Google Books shows "single-cell battery" back to 1849 (with hits throughout the remainder of the century). "One-cell battery" first shows up in 1857. By the time they were packaged up for consumer purchase, the usage was already established.
--
Evan Kirshenbaum +------------------------------------
HP Laboratories |It does me no injury for my neighbor
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On Tue, 24 Jul 2007 11:22:42 -0700, Evan Kirshenbaum

Leave it to the English to fuck up the facts, and for the rest of the world to take over a hundred years to catch it.
My electronics instructor caught it, as does anyone with a grain of common sense.
I am quite sure that the pioneers of the industry full well knew the difference, and had they read dictionaries often enough, they would have insured that it be corrected.
I'll bet that Faraday and Galvani knew it.
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The name "Google" originated from a misspelling of "googol," which refers to 10100 (the number represented by a 1 followed by one-hundred zeros). Having found its way increasingly into everyday language, the verb, "google", was added to the Merriam Webster Collegiate Dictionary and the Oxford English Dictionary in 2006, meaning, "to use the Google search engine to obtain information on the Internet. Recent and popular interpretation of "google" is ANY search for information: it is becoming an eponymic verb, just like "hoover".
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not
1. These are properly known as collective nouns, not plural nouns.
2. The word battery is itself a collective noun (for battery of cells, cf. the army term battery of guns.) Early domestic radio receivers (approx. 1925) required low-voltage direct current, which was supplied by an acid-filled device that had to be recharged at intervals. Only in the 1930s was circuitry marketed so that a receiver could generate its own DC voltage internally.
The modern automobile battery still exemplifies the word. It is still a set of interconnected acid-filled cells, i.e. a battery of cells.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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On Tue, 24 Jul 2007 07:46:25 -0400, "Don Phillipson"

Interesting. And that supplied the plate voltage of about 90V?
--
************* DAVE HATUNEN ( snipped-for-privacy@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
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Think "Crystal Radio".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_radio_receiver#1920s_and_1930s
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Don Phillipson wrote:

One of my jobs as a kid was to take my grandmother's accumulator to the battery shop for a recharge. It was of heavy glass and you could see the acid and the plates inside. It was heavy and the carrying handle, which slide down for removal, had quite sharp edges. Her wireless was one of those big old beauts with a tuning dial showing stations in every European capital city plus all the BBC stations/studios around England.
Cheers, Sage
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It was a cell, not a battery.
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Spurious Response wrote:

The object was called an "accumulator". The place to which I took it was called, in common parlance, "the battery shop".
Cheers, Sage
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