Current / Voltage regulation

okay - quick one here - i have a power supply that someone gave to me.
current rating...0.5A to 50Amp
volage ranges...1-7.5v , 6-15v , 6-30v , 31-60v.
I know its a beast but I need a high amp for an anodising station. My question is is how hard is it to build a current / voltage reg circuit for something like this? Can someone help me out with a circuit or point me in the right direction?
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in article snipped-for-privacy@corp.supernews.com, James at snipped-for-privacy@jamesvarga.com wrote on 8/31/04 6:14 PM:

From my meager knowledge of plating electrochemistry. only the low range will be of interest to you unless you put a number of your plating vats in series. That is done in the aluminum smelting industry.
What are your regulation reqirements and why? I would guess that a single transformer with thyristor phase control would be good enough. Polyphase rectifiers would be better if ripple were a problem. Because of the low electrochemical voltages used, semiconductor drops will lower efficiency if vats are not in series.
Bill
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I was thinking - could i just use various 1ohm say 25W resistors inline with the + to vary this?

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me
you already have voltage control... so just add a series load to put the current about where you want it. i have used light bulbs and electric oven elements as high power resistors. even a space heater in series might work. auto headlights for low voltage work might be what you want.
but as you say the current rating is .5 to 50A does that mean it has adjustable limiting? (otherwise the current would be 0 to 50)
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If the minimum current is .5A, then put a resistor across the output to deaw at least that much. R = E/I.
To limit the current, just get some high current lamps like 12V headlamps and put them in series with the + output lead. One headlamp might be 20A, so put another across it with a switch so you can have 20A or 40A. You could use smaller lamps for less current, each with a switch. Voltage isn't a problem, as others stated you will probably need the low voltage range.
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It HAS a current reg circuit (or should have).Does it have knob(s) labelled voltage, current or smthg.like that?Does it have gauges?It's not a beast.Real beasts are aluminium industries, that make aluminium out of bauxite (the most power-hungry industry probably).They are linked directly to the HV grid (150 kV here).Also >7,5 MVA (which is the largest MV supply available here).
-- Dimitris Tzortzakakis,Iraklion Crete,Greece major in electrical engineering freelance electrician dimtzort AT otenet DOT gr

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snipped
I worked on an steel smelter in Vera Cruz Mexico, an 200 MVA plant. Do not know the primary or secondary voltages, just that you could FEEL the arc from 200 yards away.
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in article N1E%c.172730$Lj.89765@fed1read03, SQLit at snipped-for-privacy@cox.net wrote on 9/8/04 6:45 AM:

The main point of using an electrical furnace for steel is to obtain heat in a clean way. an ac arc is probably ok although I do not really know.
For aluminum, the electrical energy is REQUIRED for electrolytic reduction of aluminum in solution. To some extent, the carbon electrodes help in the reduction process by combining with oxygen, but carbon is not a suffiently strong reducing agent without a boost from electricity. Aluminum was first produced using potassium or sodium as reducing agents. Those, produced electrolytically themselves, would not require an electrical boost.
Bill
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