Design limits of electric motors?

AFAIK, they use diesel-electric coupling.It's called Ward-Leonard coupling, also a DC-geberator and motor.
-- Dimitris Tzortzakakis,Iraklion Crete,Greece
Analogue technology rules-digital sucks http://www.patriko-kreta.com dimtzort AT otenet DOT gr the return adress is corrupted Warning:all offending emails will be deleted, and the offender/spammer will be put on my personal "black list".

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DaveC wrote:

I don't know if this represents any kind of upper limit, but the US Navy is working with American Supercondustors on a 36.5 megawatt motor for ship propulsion.
http://www.amsuper.com /
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Paul Hovnanian mailto: snipped-for-privacy@Hovnanian.com
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On Mon, 7 Jun 2004 10:59:51 -0700, Paul Hovnanian P.E. wrote

Pretty cool designs.
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DaveC
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------------ There are motors which exceed 100MVA - and 50MVA is relatively common but not at all small. As for speed- I don't know the limits- but the problems become basically mechanical rather than electrical.
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Don Kelly
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I have worked with 3MVA pump motors (big pumps) and a friend of mine built a soft-starter for a 50MVA synchronous machine used in a hydro power station
cheers Terry
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just as a reference, the large motor guys have worked with the large adjustable speed drive guys to achieve some impressive super-synchronous feats. I was involved with a 3500 Hp 2 pole motor that with the ASD at top frequency would put out 11,500 rpm. And yes, keeping the rotor and bearings together was more a mechanical problem than electrical. jtiggr
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top
now thats honking! the best I can manage is a 730Hz inside-out PMSM that stored 3MJ in the rotor (J=0.25 in SI units IIRC). the DSP for that puppy was quite tricky, as we were sampling comparatively slowly (BLT, internal model control, blah blah blah)
cheers Terry
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It depens on number of poles.(for asynchronous motors). Double pole->3000 rpm (at 50 Hz) ->3600 rpm (at 60 Hz) 4 pole->1500 rpm or 1800 rpm. A DC motor, either series, shunt or compound excitation runs at about the same speed.Or slower, of course. -- Dimitris Tzortzakakis,Iraklion Crete,Greece Analogue technology rules-digital sucks http://www.patriko-kreta.com dimtzort AT otenet DOT gr the return adress is corrupted Warning:all offending emails will be deleted, and the offender/spammer will be put on my personal "black list".

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snipped-for-privacy@nospamotenet.gr says...

DC, or universal, motors can run much faster (add a zero). As I posted earlier, it's not uncommon for a router (woodworking tool) to have a no-load speed of 25,000RPM or more.
example: http://www.portercable.com/index.asp?eT7&p (10
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Universal motors from washing machines (that's european style washing machines) initially look like a good bet if you're after a mains motor. However, with no load and without their servo control, they can get to speeds where they fly to pieces.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote in message writes:

This isnt too hard to work round though - but of course that does add complication. Reduced voltage, dummy loading, monitoring the tacho output, and designing to avoid no-loads can all work.
Regards, NT
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writes:

posted
ripping the fan off a vacuum cleaner motor so it runs unloaded is fun too - just stand well clear.
Cheers Terry
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On Tue, 8 Jun 2004 14:19:33 +0300, "Tzortzakakis Dimitrios"

My Dremel tool has a series-wound brush motor, and runs at 30,000 or so.
John
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message wrote:

or
One of the drawbacks/precautions about series-wound DC motors is that if they are unloaded, the only thing limiting their speed is the windage and friction losses. Some can literally tear themselves apart if run unloaded. Of course, your Dremel is designed *not* to do that. Some older automobile starters have been destroyed by running them on the bench to the point where the copper bars come out of the rotor slots.
daestrom
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On Tue, 8 Jun 2004 02:01:50 -0700, Rene Tschaggelar wrote

Thanks, I'll look at that.
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