How do you convert an LED infrared light source into visible light?

Does anyone know what material(s) fluoresce under infrared light? For those that are familiar with them, there are small plastic cards used
by TV technicians that will glow visibly when an infrared TV remote control is pointed to a spot on the card in close proximity. I am looking for the specific mineral or manufactured material that does this.
I am aware that you can point these infrared controller sources at a small inexpensive TV camera and more, likely than not, you will be able to see the LED "light" in a video image of the signal.
Note that this is not the same as ultraviolet fluorescence, which, of course, is much more common.
Beachcomber
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snipped-for-privacy@notreal.none (Beachcomber) wrote:

You might try the sci.optics newsgroup. They jaw about stuff like this all the time. They are heavy on the science.
Al
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On 11/25/06 11:05 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@news.verizon.net,

You don't! IR photons have less energy than visible photons. Thus, in ordinary luminescence, the luminescence will always be at a lower frequency (longer wavelength) than the exciting radiation. In principle, there are nonlinear techniques usually using parametric processes that will allow IR to CONTROL the generation of visible light. Doing so requires extra energy as well as relatively complicated methods.
Bill -- Fermez le Bush
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Radio Shack used to sell a little card that would glow red when held in the IR beam of a remote. Edmund scientific may sell this material now. John
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the
Didn't you have to "charge" the card first by exposing it to UV light?
The IR light would "trip" electrons/holes that were boosted to a higher state and cause then to fall to some intermediate state and emitting a photon in the visible light range.

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On Wed, 29 Nov 2006 18:00:35 -0500, "John Gilmer"

No, I have one of the cards. It lights up pretty much instantly when exposed to infrared light (such as from a remote control). It tells the technician that the IR diode is producing at least some IR energy.
Maybe you are thinking of those glow in the dark devices or coating materials, which, as far as I know, charge up under visible light.
I've never seen one of these that worked well (stayed on and glowing all night after a full charge). When I was a kid, radioactive Radium glow-in-the-dark watches were common. They would glow in complete darkness but they supposedly killed a lot of workers in the manufacturing plant.
What I am looking for is the mineral or rare-earch material that will light up in the presence of infrared. Something commonly available would be nice, but it seems to be a trade secret.
Beachcomber

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