How expensive would it be to add a Cat 5 port to TVs and VCRs

What kind of cost would it be to put your TV or VCR on your LAN?
It would be cool to be able to program my VCR from my computer.
It would also be nice to send a movie from my computer to my TV.
Reply to
metspitzer
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After re reading this, I should add....How much would the technology add to the cost of the TV/VCR? I know the current electronics will not do this.
Reply to
metspitzer
You still have a VCR?
Take a look at
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There are commercial versions of this, based on (Yech!) Vista and more or less generic PC hardware.
Reply to
Paul Hovnanian P.E.
You need a ReplayTV
Reply to
gfretwell
| What kind of cost would it be to put your TV or VCR on your LAN?
Adding the port ... a few cents.
Hooking the port into the electronics ... a few more cents.
Making the electronics inside the set actually understand how to communicate with other devices on the LAN ... priceless.
| It would be cool to be able to program my VCR from my computer.
What? You want a usable human interface?
| It would also be nice to send a movie from my computer to my TV.
DVI to HDMI already exists. Of course you do have to get the computer close to the TV to do this.
Reply to
phil-news-nospam
I wouldn't call 80 feet (or more), "close"...
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-- Sue
Reply to
Palindrome
Took me some time to unboggle my mind.
If a computer is in the house - why a ancient piece of technology like a VCR needs to be in the loop somewhere?
I hook up my cheapish laptop to the TV (s-vhs), and play alle the movies, doc's etc I like. I do not bother recording something, torrents / streaming etc is much easier - and no commercials :-)
On another TV in my house I use an old-skool Xbox running multi media SW - which also does it all. Works for music too (thousands of streaming channels, rock to classic)
recording is soo 2007!
..VCR!... [resume boggle mode] :-)
Reply to
Blarp
Yeah, but the cable would be a monster.
A little old Cat 5 cable can go about anywhere.
Reply to
metspitzer
Ok, a DVD Recorder then. TV and VCR were easier to type.
Reply to
metspitzer
You would think a set of dip switches to set the IP address would work.
I would think 192.168.1.1(1-8) would be a good range. You wouldn't have to know what the numbers meant. Just make sure they are different for each device.
I use 192.168.1.1(1-9)0 for my computers.
Reply to
metspitzer
Practically all of the commercial and free TCP/IP software stacks will include a DHCP client. Just plug it in and your hub will assign it an address.
Reply to
Paul Hovnanian P.E.
I can't do that. I have to open ports on my router for P2P software.
Turning the computers on in the wrong order changes the IP addresses.
Reply to
metspitzer
Use uPnP.
Reply to
Paul Hovnanian P.E.
|> |> |> | What kind of cost would it be to put your TV or VCR on your LAN? |> |> Adding the port ... a few cents. |> |> Hooking the port into the electronics ... a few more cents. |> |> Making the electronics inside the set actually understand how to communicate |> with other devices on the LAN ... priceless. |> |> |> | It would be cool to be able to program my VCR from my computer. |> |> What? You want a usable human interface? |> |> |> | It would also be nice to send a movie from my computer to my TV. |> |> DVI to HDMI already exists. Of course you do have to get the computer close |> to the TV to do this. |> | I wouldn't call 80 feet (or more), "close"... | |
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It's still not practical wire up a new house with HDMI everywhere, but it is practical to do that with CAT6.
Reply to
phil-news-nospam
Many DHCP servers will allow you to permanently assign an IP address to a given computer. Even dynamic addresses from a pool are sometimes allocated in a sticky way -- i.e. you get the same one you had last time unless it has been given to someone else. That needs some non-volatile storage if it's to work across power cycles though, and is not likely to be found in a simple DHCP implementation in a tiny router.
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
This thread's topic is silly.
There is no need to hook up old gear like that to a network. They do not even have processors, and controlling chips they do have are limited to the tasks they already perform, so an additional PWB would have to be added to even create a controlling element to such a piece of gear.
One would be much better off wiring up a universal remote such that a computer could control it. Still extra work when simply using the uni-remote by hand would be a direct interface.
Reply to
StickThatInYourPipeAndSmokeIt
So you are saying electronics aren't capable of translating 1s and 0s?
Silly?
I think you are a little short sighted.
The technology is very possible. I am just not sure how costly it would be. That is why I asked the question.
You seem to be saying it couldn't happen.
Reply to
metspitzer
Quite silly.
I think you are a lot short sighted.
I never said it wasn't dipshit. Learn to read. Then learn how to comprehend what you read correctly. You remark, is however, quite indicative of how little you know about networking, and the TCP/IP stack, in particular.
No shit, Dip Tracy. Which is why I said wiring a universal remote, which already has the capacity to control all of those items, would be far easier.
It is obvious why you asked the question. It is because you are about as green as it gets, and your reading skill are likely why you do not already know why it is not feasible, and remain green.
I never said that. You seem to think it is some cake little radio shack hobby kit.
First off, it is overkill. Since a TV only has a very, very short list of functions that can or would need to be controlled. A VCR has even fewer, considering that all would be done via existing internal menus.
You would be better off making a blue tooth to IR remote device that you program to control a device, that you access via BT wireless.
Or is that too goddamned deep for you to figure out as well?
There... asshole. I just gave you an idea for a multi-million dollar device, considering that there are millions of idiots just like you, that want to cling to old gear, yet control it with the new gear.
When you make the product, I'll take 3% commission.
Reply to
StickThatInYourPipeAndSmokeIt
Only because there is no such thing as an "HDMI Splitter/Combiner" or an "HDMI Distribution Amplifier" on the consumer market... much less repeaters. There are some 1 in 4 out POS items out there, but I have seen a lot of bad items as well. Many add "snow" and other artifacts to what we thought was an error free image standard.
When one does arrive, it will likely be some cheap Chinese crap that has stepped outside the boundaries that keep US and legit makers from producing such an item. Buyer beware.
Reply to
StickThatInYourPipeAndSmokeIt
| | |>|> |>|> |>|> |>|> | What kind of cost would it be to put your TV or VCR on your LAN? |>|> |>|> Adding the port ... a few cents. |>|> |>|> Hooking the port into the electronics ... a few more cents. |>|> |>|> Making the electronics inside the set actually understand how to communicate |>|> with other devices on the LAN ... priceless. |>|> |>|> |>|> | It would be cool to be able to program my VCR from my computer. |>|> |>|> What? You want a usable human interface? |>|> |>|> |>|> | It would also be nice to send a movie from my computer to my TV. |>|> |>|> DVI to HDMI already exists. Of course you do have to get the computer close |>|> to the TV to do this. |>|> |>| I wouldn't call 80 feet (or more), "close"... |>| |>|
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|> |>It's still not practical wire up a new house with HDMI everywhere, but it is |>practical to do that with CAT6. | | | Only because there is no such thing as an "HDMI Splitter/Combiner" or an | "HDMI Distribution Amplifier" on the consumer market... much less | repeaters. There are some 1 in 4 out POS items out there, but I have | seen a lot of bad items as well. Many add "snow" and other artifacts to | what we thought was an error free image standard.
If find one that can add snow to HDCP protected video, let me know.
| When one does arrive, it will likely be some cheap Chinese crap that | has stepped outside the boundaries that keep US and legit makers from | producing such an item. Buyer beware.
Including HDCP cracking.
Reply to
phil-news-nospam

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