How expensive would it be to add a Cat 5 port to TVs and VCRs

On 08 Aug 2008 15:07:56 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:


This thread's topic is silly.
There is no need to hook up old gear like that to a network. They do not even have processors, and controlling chips they do have are limited to the tasks they already perform, so an additional PWB would have to be added to even create a controlling element to such a piece of gear.
One would be much better off wiring up a universal remote such that a computer could control it. Still extra work when simply using the uni-remote by hand would be a direct interface.
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On Fri, 08 Aug 2008 09:44:43 -0700, StickThatInYourPipeAndSmokeIt

So you are saying electronics aren't capable of translating 1s and 0s?
Silly?
I think you are a little short sighted.
The technology is very possible. I am just not sure how costly it would be. That is why I asked the question.
You seem to be saying it couldn't happen.
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wrote:

Quite silly.

I think you are a lot short sighted.

I never said it wasn't dipshit. Learn to read. Then learn how to comprehend what you read correctly. You remark, is however, quite indicative of how little you know about networking, and the TCP/IP stack, in particular.

No shit, Dip Tracy. Which is why I said wiring a universal remote, which already has the capacity to control all of those items, would be far easier.

It is obvious why you asked the question. It is because you are about as green as it gets, and your reading skill are likely why you do not already know why it is not feasible, and remain green.

I never said that. You seem to think it is some cake little radio shack hobby kit.
First off, it is overkill. Since a TV only has a very, very short list of functions that can or would need to be controlled. A VCR has even fewer, considering that all would be done via existing internal menus.
You would be better off making a blue tooth to IR remote device that you program to control a device, that you access via BT wireless.
Or is that too goddamned deep for you to figure out as well?
There... asshole. I just gave you an idea for a multi-million dollar device, considering that there are millions of idiots just like you, that want to cling to old gear, yet control it with the new gear.
When you make the product, I'll take 3% commission.
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| On Thu, 07 Aug 2008 13:16:43 -0700, "Paul Hovnanian P.E."
| |>metspitzer wrote: |>>
|>> |>> > |>> >Making the electronics inside the set actually understand how to communicate |>> >with other devices on the LAN ... priceless. |>> > |>> You would think a set of dip switches to set the IP address would |>> work. |>> |>> I would think 192.168.1.1(1-8) would be a good range. You wouldn't |>> have to know what the numbers meant. Just make sure they are |>> different for each device. |>> |>> I use 192.168.1.1(1-9)0 for my computers. |> |>Practically all of the commercial and free TCP/IP software stacks will |>include a DHCP client. Just plug it in and your hub will assign it an |>address. | | I can't do that. I have to open ports on my router for P2P software. | | Turning the computers on in the wrong order changes the IP addresses.
I use static IP addresses configured in to all my computers. Even Windows can do that. I booted up a Ubuntu live CD that doesn't use the hard drive as a means to test that DHCP on my router was OK. My DCHP is configured with 64 available addresses for "guests".
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