Muddle over left/right channel of TRS plug

I have a 3.5mm TRS plug which is prewired. It looks like this
http://www.mycablemart.com/store/images/products/1085_large.jpg
The tip of that TRS plug is connected to the red wire (RIGHT channel).
Has that been done correctly? I thought the tip of the TRS plug is the LEFT channel.
(I also have a 3.5mm TRS socket which is prewired and the red wire is also the tip.)
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Nope. Tip is left. It has been for 50 years.
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Just remember: "Ring Right"
Isaac
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On Thu, 24 Sep 2009 16:28:09 -0700, "William Sommerwerck"

I happen to like my tips on the right.
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Why do I feel I'm sitting under the caterpillar's mushroom?
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On Fri, 25 Sep 2009 07:06:06 -0700, William Sommerwerck wrote:

Good drugs? %-}
Cheers! Rich
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On Sep 25, 10:06am, "William Sommerwerck"

___________ This will all be just fine! :D
I just use the convention - Red Right, and I never confuse them.
-CC
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Does it matter? If it's backwards then just reverse the RCA's?
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The tip is normally left - as left is conventionally follows mono as regards wiring convention.
As to colours, in the UK some pro stuff uses red and green as per the naval convention - ie red (port) left, green (starboard) right. Whereas in domestic stuff red is usually right. Just to add to the confusion.
--
*Speak softly and carry a cellular phone *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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As far as the RCA plugs are concerned, the Red plug has long been Right.
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Pro gear doesn't use RCA plugs. But can use TRS.
--
*I started out with nothing, and I still have most of it*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Fri, 25 Sep 2009 17:38:21 +0100, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Is "TRS" a mnemonic for something? All I can think of when I see it is the Radio Shack/Tandy TRS-80, pronounced "Trash 80". ;-)
Thanks, Rich
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tip / ring / sleeve
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Tip ring sleeve. Unbalanced stereo or balanced mono. Or sometimes a mono in and out on a mixer.
I'd guess originally designed for telephone exchanges. In the UK, the telephone one is known as a type 316 and has a smaller tip than stereo jack plugs. And is still in use - must have been designed over 100 years ago. Dunno if the US one is the same.
--
*Why isn't there a special name for the back of your knee?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Fri, 25 Sep 2009 23:44:44 +0100, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Oh, yes - the US has been using "Tip & Ring" for about as long as there have been telephone exchanges. (a hundred years?) :-)
My cousin Owen inherited Uncle Dick's farm - they still have a wall-mounted crank-style phone with the separate earpiece similar to this:
http://youngandthewireless.com/emptying-nests/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/old_telephone.jpg
[mind the wrap] and they have an early phone book - most of the phone numbers were two digits! (Circuit & phone). (it wasn't a very big town. ;-)
If you're curious, it's Lake Crystal, MN.
Cheers! Rich
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But, I think, more commomly known as a "Jack plug". Usually available in 2.5mm, 3.5mm and 1/4". The P.O. type 316 is 1/4", as are the ones more commonly used in the applications Dave has suggested.
In telephone usage, the 1/4" variety can frequently be found with more contacts in the form of additional rings when used, for example, with a headset.
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wrote:

"jack plug" seems to be a British usage - elsewhere it is an oxymoron - a plug is inserted into a jack, so you can't have a "jack plug". In the US and Canada, the connectors are more commonly known as "phone plug" (male) and "phone jack" (female).
I recall seeing a version slightly smaller than 1/4" (0.216?) somewhere.
The telco versions have a different tip shape than the commercial versions.
--
Peter Bennett, VE7CEI
peterbb4 (at) interchange.ubc.ca
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Seems strange to me as 'Jack' is a common name denoting male. Jack rabbit, jack tar, etc. Wonder what the root is in this case? But would they *really* talk about a 'phone plug' in a telephone exchange? You don't in a sound studio where such things are used in a patch bay - known as a jackfield. The leads with a plug on both ends are known as patch cords or double enders. But of course jargon varies even in the same country - never mine different ones.

If it's the telecom or pro version, called bantam.

One thing to note is if you insert a 1/4 stereo to a jack socket designed for a telco type it can short things out - it pushes the tip contact onto the frame.
--
*My designated driver drove me to drink

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Believe it or not, the OED2 doesn't list this usage.
Many years ago, when I worked for Bendix Field Engineering, I became acquainted with what was known as a "jackscrew" connector. There were male and female versions, so I suggested to the manufacturer that they be rechristened "johnscrew" and "janescrew" connectors. They had no idea what I was talking about.
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On Fri, 25 Sep 2009 19:32:51 -0700, Peter Bennett

--
The old US military nomenclature for the MIL-SPEC 1/4", 2 conductor
phone plug was "PL55", and "pl68" for the 0.206", 3 conductor microphone
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