Not exactly electrical

What do you guys know about OTA TV signals. How much are the affected by trees? Long story short I have a "70 mile deep fringe" reflector antenna 30
feet up, aimed right at a tower 30 miles away, flat land in Florida. The signal still sucks. I had a lesser antenna same result. I even tried an amplifier. It still drops out occasionally. There is a big oak tree right in front of the antenna (20 feet away). It is just limbs at that height, not a log. Would moving this away from that tree help? I would just try it but it will be complicated to do.
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Leaves carry moisture and become good VHF reflectors and absorbers. So avoid leaves where possible.
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Pretty sure there are no VHF broadcasters any more. Might have a tough time tuning a signal that does not exist.
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On Thu, 11 Jul 2019 11:16:51 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@decadence.org wrote:

I guess someone should tell our CBS affiliate to shut down then. He is on channel 11. (Digital)
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Hand hold your antenna on the ground or roof while looking at the Rx signal bars for each channel. I can get Buffalo from Toronto which much further than yours. Cable quality of RG6 is important and possible an antenna Amp may help if you have lossy long cable. compare your signals with TVfools.c om
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On 7/5/19 10:20 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Hello, and your question is very much "electrical" from an electromagnetic wave propagation question. I don't think trees generally have a significant effect on wave attenuation in the broadcast TV frequency bands. There might be some reflection if said trees are soaked with water during a rainstorm or have some metallic objects attached but otherwise I'd look for some other reason like the feed cable length/loss and the connections from the antenna to the receiver. A preamp will only be effective if the receiver itself is contributing significant excess noise relative to the received signal level. Also if you use a preamp it should be ideally located at the antenna feedpoint, not at the end of the feed cable connected to the receiver's antenna input. Sincerely,
--
J. B. Wood e-mail: arl snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com

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On Mon, 8 Jul 2019 06:48:37 -0400, "J.B. Wood"

Thanks all. I will look at the transmission line again. I am using the RG-6 Dish gave me so I assume it is pretty good wire. There are 2 and I have swapped them. The amp is at the antenna end. It is working because without it the problem is worse. I have noticed the receiver in the TV itself is better than the TiVo and for that matter two different RF modules in a Dish box. I am still longing for the days that a bad signal just gave you a little snow. ;-)
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in

If you are trying to get an HDTV signal, you need a digital receiver and they usually are either full, clean signal, or dropped with zero screen output. There are no "snowy channels".
If you are still trying to tune an old analog TV station... there are not supposed to be any operating any more.
So UHF is all you need because that is all that gets broadcasted on any more.
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