Schematics question



The device itself provides the power for the alarm I think. Yes I have a continuity tester I gave the name of the device req
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On 3/12/2010 12:44 AM, reqluq wrote:

Usually such devices are not self powered, and a gander at the HWell website states an input power, which, to me, means that the device is not self powered.
You need to find out the current draw of your bell/ringer and get a power supply that will power it and the photo sensor. The photo sensor uses 50 mA. That is a negligible quantity. Look at the name plate of the bell/ringer and find out what the current draw is, multiply that number by 2, and find a power supply that will provide the current and the proper voltage while making sure that the available current is *more* than the sum of the sensor and bell together. Getting more power than you need is not a bad thing.
This leads to the next thought in this process. How handy are you? There are different types of power supplies, and I'd recommend getting a cheap wall-wart type for this project as long as you know how to use the meter and how to determine the polarity of the power supply. If there is any thought of expanding this system, then I'd ask you to go and look for a quality power supply. Of course, this leads to more complications...such as have you ever spliced into a 120vac cord and do you know how to properly connect such a cord to a device?
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I meant I think he device powers itself *and* the alarm..a power source did come with the device

Yes I do: I have installed panels and sub panels..light switch boxes and outlets; fans and lights from it. I made up my own 4 outlet receptacle for a long extension cord I use when I play in my band at functions. Yes I can splice and dice. Yes I have some knowledge. I guess from now on when I ask a question I need to put my resume, basic though it is :-)
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On 3/15/2010 11:34 PM, reqluq wrote:
<snip>

Cool, then you won't have to worry about getting a power supply.

Good to know, and this is something you should have stated from the get go.
On your desk/workbench you may:
Hook up the power supply to the sensor.
Face the sensor at a reflective surface, or the beam reflector that should have come with the unit, making sure that there is a couple of feet between the two.
Energize the power supply.
Set your meter for Ohm/continuity and place the red lead on the COM terminal, and the black lead on the NC terminal. Does it show zero Ohms or continuity? While holding the test leads on the terminals with one hand, move your other hand in front of the sensor and block the beam for 1 second, then remove your hand from in front of the beam. Does the Ohms/continuity change?
Move the black lead to the NO terminal and place your hand in front of the beam as before. The meter readings should be exactly opposite from the previous readings.
The combination that does not show continuity when your hand is not blocking the beam, but does show continuity when your hand is blocking the beam, is the combination that you want to use.
Power goes in on the COM, and goes out on the NO or NC to the bell.
Power Supply (+) ====> COM
NC OR NO ====> (+)Bell(-) ====> Power Supply (-)
Some might have you "sink" the bell, but I won't go there...
Please let us know which state is normally closed with this device. Powered or unpowered. It might be a useful bit of information for someone in the future.
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Excellent!! Excellent response!! When I get over this flu I will do just that, and also write back on the results.. I will try to get a copy of the schematic up also, req
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Here is schematic..not to good on the quality but... Haven't done the test yet http://pbckt.com/sR.lG3?evt=user_media_share req

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On 3/9/2010 9:54 PM, reqluq wrote:

Are you using a controller?
I'm assuming that you are using a power supply, a photo sensor, and a bell.
The power supply will have a positive (+) and a negative (-) output.
The bell, as you stated, has a (+) and a (-).
The photo sensor should have a (+) and a (-) , COM, NC, and NO.
Wire from the power supply (-) to the photo sensor (-), and to the bell (-).
Wire from the power supply (+) to the photo sensor (+), and the photo sensor (COM).
Wire from the photo sensor (NO) to the bell (+).
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Around here?

The opposite. Normal == *not* energized
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Getting ready to test the system ..the dc power supply has a plus, minus, then a M italic type symbol with an I on the top as if it was a whisk broom with a handles and someone was sweeping.. It is a short circuit protected power supply so I assume it's a ground of some sort...just want to be sure.. thanks
req

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Ok so I called up a company inthe us for help..they said that the alarm has to be powered, so connect the - from the power supply to the com on the reciever, then from NC on reciever to alarm - . The + from power supply goes direct to + on alarm. Before I did all this I continuity tested the connection and it was closed..This meant that with the power on it would open the circuit, which it did when I powered up. So when beam is broken the circuit closes and alarm goes off. which it did when I connected the alarm. I used same power supply for all three and worked fine. So thanks to all for the responses I guess I'm done req

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