electronic rim type cylinder

In the UK all the stand alone digital locks are based around either the
mortice latch or the American deadbolt. I've been to the USA a few
times and being a locksmith I naturally look out for 'new' locks. On
American TV programmes we get in the UK I often see 'Yale' type locks
such as the 116 or 197 series yet I've never seen them on doors when in
America. I was wondering if Yale type rim locks are actually quite
rare and what we see on TV is a bit of 'product placement' The reason
for asking is that very soon I will be launching a digital replacement
rim cylinder that is self contained. You simply replace the cylinder,
connect the battery pack and re-fit the existing lock casing. The
product is Anglo-American and the 'clever' bit is a very special
solenoid designed and developed in the USA for this project. I know
the potential in the UK for the product but havent a clue if it will
run in the USA. As far as I am aware the product is unique and will be
less expensive that products such as Cobra etc. Could any USA based
locksmiths please advise if Yale type rim locks are still used in
America or if they are a dead or dying breed.
Many thanks.
Reply to
lockman49
Loading thread data ...
Having trouble finding it right now, but there's already one on the market. Logic (including schedules and history) and solenoid in key cylinder; logic (including schedules and history) and power in key. No wires, retrofits into a huge number of applications. (The mechanism's small enough that it can work in Key-in-Knob and equivalent applications, not just in rim or mortise form-factor.)
Note: NO battery pack needed in that system. Power comes form the key. That seems to beat your system for convenience in mounting, though the key may or may not be bulkier.
You may or may not be able to compete on price; since they are so versitile and convenient to work with, they aren't the cheapest solution. Or if you're pushing a combination solution rather than electronic key.
(BTW, if what you mean by "yale type" locks is vertical deadbolt: Yes they're still in use, but they aren't highly popular except in places where their physical strength is a significant selling point. Too many consumers seem to consider them ugly.)
Reply to
Joe Kesselman
Hi Joe,
Thanks for the info. What I have designed is a digital keypad cylinder, no keys. It is scheduled to retail in the UK for about £130 which is about $210. It will operate any type and function of Yale or similar rim lock, vertical, latch, deadlatch etc.
Years ago I designed the worlds first locking system to use transponders and that didnt half give me grey hairs (most of which have fallen out). A lot of the 'new' systems with smart keys are very expensive for what they are and not exactly capable of withstanding physical attack. I also find it ironic that the knowledge gained by one manufacturer does not bleed across to another making the next generation. This means that fundamental issues can remain unaddressed. A good example of which is electrostatic discharge. In physical locks the design can be fully evaluated and improved, with electronics it is far harder to do and it rarely happens.
I believe that we are a bit in limbo with technology. In the not too distant future there will be a new generation of electromechanical systems that dont need any batteries at all. A bit like Mass Hamiltoon taken to the Nth degree. I have a sneaky feeling these will manifest in Russia where they seem to be way ahead of the big players. Solar power is quickly developing into a viable solution in some lock systems, its not there yet but it wont be long. I guess the ultimate will be a reader that can identify an individuals brain waves but then some swine will 'clone' them !
I agree about looks, in the UK there is a huge range of these type of casings, the ugly ones seem to be produced for the American Market. Its wierd in a way, the two most beautiful aircraft ever made were the Mustang and Spitfire yet when it comes to door furniture the difference in taste from consumers separated by the pond is amazing.
Reply to
lockman49
In the US the Yale 197, etc. are quite popular in NYC where the logic seems to be that 'the uglier it is, the stronger it must be'. Other uses are in commercial environments, typically on a back door and of course on many exit devices.
If you can get your mechanism into a 1" length American style mortise cylinder you will have a larger market potential. BBE.
lockman49 wrote: > > In the UK all the stand alone digital locks are based around either the > mortice latch or the American deadbolt. I've been to the USA a few > times and being a locksmith I naturally look out for 'new' locks. On > American TV programmes we get in the UK I often see 'Yale' type locks > such as the 116 or 197 series yet I've never seen them on doors when in > America. I was wondering if Yale type rim locks are actually quite > rare and what we see on TV is a bit of 'product placement' The reason > for asking is that very soon I will be launching a digital replacement > rim cylinder that is self contained. You simply replace the cylinder, > connect the battery pack and re-fit the existing lock casing. The > product is Anglo-American and the 'clever' bit is a very special > solenoid designed and developed in the USA for this project. I know > the potential in the UK for the product but havent a clue if it will > run in the USA. As far as I am aware the product is unique and will be > less expensive that products such as Cobra etc. Could any USA based > locksmiths please advise if Yale type rim locks are still used in > America or if they are a dead or dying breed. > > Many thanks.
Reply to
Billy B. Edwards Jr.
Hi Billy,
Thanks for the info. The mechanism I have designed will fit into any 1/2inch bore so can be used in virtually any type of cylinder profile including American mortise. I thought about making this variant but there seems to be a lot on the market out there although they are rather bulky. I always try to design something new rather than a variation on an existing product type. My logic is based on the fact that in the UK, if a person wants a digital lock on a door and they already have a Yale rim lock why replace it with a lock that has to be fitted from scratch elsewhere on the door ? It costs more, takes more time and is often less secure against attack. I can see the logic of making an American mortise version but then I would be competing with the big boys who often use inferior materials and have production in the far east. All my designs are machined from soild metal and produced in the UK or the USA and they are never designed to a price, they are designed to perform. This usually means the economics dont work out but from time to time something novel pops into my head which balances things out, which I hope my new digilock will do.
Due to the shear size of the USA it is very difficult to establish market potential and what the market is looking for. I will have to tip my toe in the water to find out. I dont know about you guys over there but in the UK Assa Abloy group own just about all lock companies which is distorting things somewhat and it very difficult for any innovator to get a foot hold.
Regards
Reply to
lockman49
The one you are thinking of is the Cyberlock by Videx. It works, and retrofits easily in Rim, Mortise and many KIK/KIL applications. I even put one in a padlock, put the padlock in a freezer at 0 degrees and it still worked fine.
It has all the potential of a wired access control system except it's not "real time". You have to go retrieve the data from the locks and keys.
Lock cylinders are reasonable, Keys are $75.00. Lithium batteries in the key are pricy and need replacement at least once a year.
It's a great alternative to wired systems.
Bob
Reply to
Bob B.

Site Timeline

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.