Ideal Security vertical deadbolt - how to remove?

Hi again guys,

I've had to start a new topic for this, because a couple of days ago I posted the same message under the old topic and it didn't go to the top of the group, so it's doubtful that anyone would see it (it was several pages down).

Anyway, to recap, we have a dual cylinder, automatic Ideal Security vertical deadbolt (Superguard?) that we purchased in ~1980. Unfortunately, we have lost the piece of wire and the manual that were supplied with it that give the instructions for how to remove the lock.

My dad and I have tried Bob DeWeese's suggestions for using a piece of wire to remove the lock, but unfortunately we've had no luck at all. We just can't seem to find anything inside for the wire to latch onto, and it's virtually impossible to shine any light in there to see what we're doing. Joe Kesselman suggested that there may be a retainer inside that needs to be pressed down while turning the key all the way in either direction, but we can't find this either.

I don't know how to post pictures into these newsgroups, so I've hosted the pics myself and have included the links below. I apologise for the quality, as the only digital camera we have is the one in my phone :(

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of the lock

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of cylinder (interior of house), showing the holes where the wire is inserted. Note that the top hole is half covered, and this is the same whether or not a key is inserted. In this picture, the bottom hole is fully covered, as it is only uncovered when the key is turned to a certain angle.

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picture as above, except the key is inserted and turned to reveal the bottom hole. The top hole is still half covered as above.

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of lock and handle from outside the house.

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of entire lock from the side of the door. Note that the metal ball is missing (round hole in the middle of the picture). This used to act like a catch so the door wouldn't swing open by itself when it wasn't deadbolted.

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don't know if this is in fact called a striker plate, but it is the part that the lock latches into when the door is shut.

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view of the "striker plate". Note that our door jam is very thin - I'd say less than an inch.

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piece of wire that dad made up to try and get the lock off :) This is *not* the original that came with the lock. We have been inserting the left end into the lock.

If anyone could lend us a hand with specific instructions on how to get this lock off, or even a scan (or hyperlink to) of the inside of the lock, it would be much appreciated. We have tried pretty much everything we can think of to get it off so far, other than actually breaking the lock :)

We also don't know which hole we are supposed to be putting the wire into. I would have thought it would be the top one, since half the hole (is this possible? :P) is never covered. However, my dad thinks it is the bottom hole, since the entire hole is exposed when the key is turned to a certain angle. How far do we insert the wire, and approximately where (and what) are we supposed to be "grabbing"? Thanks in advance for your help,

Ben

Reply to
benro2
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I am ASSUMING ONLY.. the key must be at the 'certain angle.. and then, if the hole is a SMALL diameter, like a reasonable sized wire- a clothes hanger.. that you would PUSH something. movement in could be as little as under 1/8". it ALSO might mean, that ONCE the wire was inserted and either 'in place' OR something pushed in, that the key would turn FURTHER?? its worth a shot..

by the pictures this might remove the cover.. OR allow it to be gotten off with a carefully applied screwdriver. look on the INNER side of the lock cover, all around where it meets the door for a very small (3/16" or so, give or take) flat 'opening' in the edge of the cover where a screwdriver could be placed.. I do NOT know, but am making a pure guess --Shiva--

Reply to
--Shiva--

What you have to do is put a small stiff wire (paper clip)into one of the holes and see if there is spring tension in that hole. If not then use the other hole. Push in and turn the housing that the cylinder is in. Just the housing. It will turn about 1/4 turn and pull out. To replace it, you just put it back in and turn till you hear it click in place.

Reply to
safe tech

Thanks for your help guys.

We've tried all your suggestions, but unfortunately, we still can't get the thing off.

Safe tech, my dad was sure that the piece of wire supplied with the lock had a 90-degree turn at the end of it (although in his old age he could be wrong :P), presumably to hook onto something inside, whereas you suggest using a straight piece of wire. We tried using a straightened paperclip but still cannot find anything to push. Would you happen to have a diagram or something?

The main problem we have is that we have no way of seeing inside, and we don't know where inside the lock we're supposed to be operating, which makes it very hard. Would it help if I drew up a cross-sectional diagram of the lock and someone draw the approximate location of the release?

Thanks again for your help,

Ben

Reply to
benro2

I'll go back to hunting for the samples I have squirreled away somewhere... Sigh. Moved several years ago and *STILL* digging through the boxes. I'll get everything out just in time to move again, i expect.

Reply to
Joe Kesselman (address as shown

I can relate to that....

Leon Rowell

Joe Kesselman (address as shown) wrote:

Reply to
Leon Rowell

Using the paper clip, make sure it is a very stiff one. A weak one will just bend and prove to be of no use. You push the wire straight in until you find the spring tension. It's not real stiff to push in. You must have the key turned to find the hole. when you find the spring, push the paper clip (or whatever you're using) in and turn the housing that the inside cylinder is in. It will rotate about 1/8 of a turn. Pull out and you have the inside cylinder off the lock.

Reply to
safe tech

BTW, Ideal Security and Craftsman locks are the same thing when it comes to the vertical deadbolt. Both are made of pot metal and are garbage locks. I know this might be expensive but you might want to replace the dodr and frame and put some quality locks on instead of that junk. Just my opinion

Reply to
safe tech

Hi again guys,

Some good news! My dad finally managed to get our lock off the door last night! Apparently the spring inside was very stiff so he needed a small Allen key to push it in. That's probably why we were having trouble in the first place - we didn't know that so much pressure was required.

Anyway, once again, thanks very much for all your help.

Regards,

Ben PS: I have posted this message to my old thread and the new one.

Reply to
benro2

This information was most helpful but I felt it could use a bit more detail for others trying to change over their old locks. I used the Allen Wrench to get the lock cap off. First you turn the key to expose the opening to the lock insides. I then inserted the long end straight into the hole and pushed with quite a bit of force. What you are trying to do is depress a piece of very stiff metal. Push and turn the cover at the same time. Turn the cover to the left about 1/4". The whole thing just pops open. Turn and remove the key and take the cover off to expose the screws. I will take a picture of the inside of the lock (with the cap off) if you'd like to see just what it is you are depressing. Email me with the request. Good luck to everyone encountering this job! sn0wflakes

Reply to
sn0wflakes

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