What is the best door cavity light

Could I please have the groups opinions on the best (brightest) door cavity
light or the boroscopes like my friend uses that he can see his own ear wax
with? He got his after doing a job for a doctor. I can't afford that but
the light I have just doesn't cut it.
Glen
Reply to
Glen Cooper
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No question about it. Pro Lock's Super Probe. It takes a makita 9.6V battery. I've owned about five different car opening lights over the years and this one is the best I've ever owned!
The first time I ever saw one was at an ALOA convention. (This was before ProLock purchased it. It was then called the "Jiffy Light") There was a car door set up with the light inside it and turned on. Even in a well lit convention hall you could see everything in the door (including the twenty and fifty dollar bills laying in the bottom of the door.
There was a large gentleman sitting at the booth sort of laid-back with his hands folded over his large gut. I asked him what the twenty and fifty were doing in the bottom of the door.
Without missing a beat, (in a strong southern draw), he replied, "Boy, that's what yer 'spozed ta see when ya look in a car dow-er!"
I bought one on the spot! And to this day, I've never seen a better one. It runs about $90 (not including the battery), but worth every penny!!!
Bobby
Reply to
Bob DeWeese, CML
agreed... it IS a light... bar none... nice case to store it in... easy to transport... and comes apart pretty well, so its easy to hang on the belt...
--Shiva-- nuk pu nuk
Reply to
--Shiva--
They have a 12 volt now too for 87.00 minus the battery. That's about the same price as the 9.6 and the 12v replacement bulbs are less than 20 bucks.
I was wondering about the bulbs. Will they burn out easy when you're working in the rain? That much voltage should create a lot of heat.
Reply to
Glen Cooper
I wonder if a LED small enough to go into a door cavity would create enough light or is that still on the drawing board in a lab somewhere? That would be a better way to go because LED lites run cool and the bulbs like you say last what amounts to be forever and the battery could be much smaller.
Reply to
Glen Cooper
I have a 9.6 Makita drill, and use the same battery.. the bulb I think runs on it at 6.V AS OF YET... 3-4 years now, have NOT broken or had the bulb burn out... it has been rained on a bit, but the bulb is not totally bare, it has a plastic sleeve on part of it...clear, but its there for 'support'
--Shiva-- nuk pu nuk
Reply to
--Shiva--
they are small enough to go in to a door no problem, although i have not seen one put on a wand it would be an easy thing to do.
Reply to
todd
Coast makes a LED flashlight on a 6 inch flexible wand. It's bright enough to hurt your eyes when you look directly into it.
The brightest LEDs still produce only a fraction of the light available with halogen incandescent bulbs. They DO manage to produce a pretty bright beam that has no "hot spot" in the middle. This helps keep the contrast in a more normal range. The batteries also last a LOOOOOOONG time.
The brighter LED flashlights use multiple LEDS and/or run at a higher voltage (and thus ampherage) than they should. Overdriving the LED reduces the life of the LED and can cause color changes. It also eats up the battery quicker.
I have half-a-dozen LED flashlights, but I don't think I'd trade in my Maglights yet. I do keep a "Coast" brand 2 inch long LED light in my pocket for those times when I need a light on the spur of the moment. I also keep a small LED flashlight hanging on a nail in the bathroom. It's the darkest room in the house during a power failure.
Oh. Did I mention that I like gadgets? A new lightbulb design that uses a lattice structure for the tungsten filament is in the works. VERY efficient. It produces little heat and uses normal voltages. I can't wait.
Daniel
Reply to
dbs
Now that sounds like a very promising idea indeed! let us (or at least me) know when you hear more. Phil
Reply to
cashcroft
If you don't have a PALight yet, you might consider one for that. They're a good size to velcro into an appropriate spot, and the lowest always-on setting is just bright enough to let you hit the bowl without hurting dark-adjusted eyes :)
The 9V battery seems to last just short of forever (as in over a year on one Duracell) in that mode.
I've considered trying to make brackets to mount a few as path lights that could be grabbed and used as flashlights in an emergency.
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Reply to
kd5nrh

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