fiberglass insulation made in 1930; Museum of insulation???

R Molony wrote:


Now I wonder, Bob, what is the relationship between cleavage planes and the ability of asbestos to NOT-burn. There maybe no relationship and that the cleavage planes maybe a characteristic separate from the ability to not burn.
Bob, or Henry, can you tell me at what temperature asbestos does begin to be affected by heat??
Recently I was in a discussion in sci.physics.fusion about a Sun poison to slow down the fusion in the Sun. Now I do not expect asbestos to be a Sun poison for I can envision it vaporizing as it nears the Sun regions.
But is Asbestos perhaps the material that if aimed at the center of the Sun, that asbestos would survive unvaporized the longest of all Earth materials???
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I have taken the Asbestos identification class at the McCrone Research Institute in Chicago. I can tell you it is SUPER easy for anyone with the training to tell you PASS/FAIL, whether something is asbestos or not.
I worked at a lab that was trying to become certified for asbestos identification, and I know it gets a lot more difficult when it comes to certification requirements.
For the class, we had to determine the crystal structure and index of refraction and visually examine the fibers to positively identify the type of asbestos. If there was more than one kind present, we had to account for the quantity of each relative to the other.
Due to staffing problems, we never did achieve certification. Although I had gone through the certification program.
I'm sure there are some unscrupulous labs out there that probably get kickbacks from asbestos removal companies, BUT, it is a Felony to falsify lab reports. Not to mention that most asbestos removal companies I know of have more work than they can handle anyway.
You can legally mail samples. For peace of mind, seal it in a double layer of zip-lock bags. It is not hazardous waste until it has been identified as such.
Although I can tell you YES or NO if your material has asbestos in it, my lab is not certified for the analysis. I can recommend one that we trust if you are interested.
It really is as simple as putting a small sample on a microscope slide, adding a drop of the cargile (sp?) fluid, dropping a cover slip on top, and taking a quick peak under the lens. It shouldn't take more than 1 minute (assuming there are fibers visible that can be removed from a clump of sample). And around here $30 per sample might not be out of the question. Our lab charges $35 minimum even if you only want a pH analysis.
Dave
On Sat, 13 Sep 2003 10:15:40 -0500, Archimedes Plutonium

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Some of the early fiberglass insulation is wicked stuff. Rigid needled mass easily capable of piercing the heaviest gloves as well as the soles of shoes and boots
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1930 give a description. Query with the OCF Company. Owens Corning Fiberglass make fiberglass of many varieties.( E- , C- , S- A- ,etc)
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Back in 1930 it would probably have been a form of rock wool, made by pouring molten basalt or a similar rock (maybe limestone with additives) onto a spinning disc (the Hager disc, see DRP No.539 738 of 26 Nov 1931), or else steam blowing the stream of vitreous material flowing from a cupola (see DRP No.626 436 of 26 Feb 1936).
Both fairly crude processes, but they carried on in use until the 1950s or even later.
The references come from "Glass Machines" by W Giegerich and W Trier, published by Springer Verlag in 1969 and translated by Prof Norbert Kreidl, page 381.
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Terry Harper
http://www.terry.harper.btinternet.co.uk /
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circa
or
Kreidl,
While in college in the 60's I worked summers for an electrician. Being the young squirt, I got to do all the crawling-into-holes tasks. One attic I went into had loose fiberglass (I hope it was fiberglass) with no paper backing placed between the rafters. Needless to sy, my clothes got full of it. I itched for a week.
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the
of
Paper backing? That's not normally used. The batt is rolled up into a roll, and then rolled out into the gap between the rafters. The itch goes away.
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Terry Harper
http://www.terry.harper.btinternet.co.uk /
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Terry Harper wrote:

Not even... people blow it in now, using a large machine that pumps the insulation into the attic... what a mess it makes, however, it is a very effective system...
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

Not even. Sometimes the roll it out. Sometimes they blow it in. Sometimes they nail it in as ridged foam boards. Sometimes they spray it in and trim off the excess foam. There are lots of systems available.
Marc
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