Nissan Looking At Roadbed Electrification

Induction may make sense in parking lots or city streets but the wire in an 18" diameter slotted pipe under the roadbed is best for the
freeways.
Bret Cahill
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Slotted "roadways" only work indoors sheltered from the elements for toy cars all about the same size.
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Jim Pennino

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That 40 mile bridge section of I-10 through the bayou west of New Orleans could have the wires _under_ the bridge.
Bret Cahill
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You haven't a clue why they put freeways on bridges in Louisiana, do you?
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Jim Pennino

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They're afraid of gators.
Bret Cahill
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On Mon, 19 Oct 2009 08:21:04 -0700 (PDT), Bret Cahill

Imagine the added distraction of drivers worrying about that, too.
Imagine the electrical efficiency while you're at it.
The gasoline-powered IC engine is a technological wonder. It starts instantly, has lots of power, is reliable, and can go most anywhere, 300 miles at at time between 5-minute refuels.
John
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Smart steering and braking would make driving much safer and easier w/ or w/o without electrification.
The only hope is to go to higher and higher technology.

That's the argument for trolley rail or wire.
Maybe the Japanese have less potholes as well as less petroleum than the US which may be why they are considering it first.

Best of all ICE only costs 2 cents/watt -- the cheapest prime mover ever!
If they can get rid of the rare earth metals in performance electric motors and if the price of copper doesn't soar too much then EV and hybrid drive trains might eventually be only a few cents/watt too.
Bret Cahill
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Toyota is sure doing a good job of it.
"Toyota's runaway-car worries may not stop at floor mats"
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-toyota-recall18-2009oct18,0,739395.story

The fast there only about 79 million total vehicles (buses, cars, motorbikes, etc) in Japan and the US has about 251 million cars alone has nothing to do with it, I'm sure.
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Jim Pennino

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Economies of scale are always important.
We need to get everyone to agree to the same system.
Bret Cahill
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On Mon, 19 Oct 2009 19:02:07 -0700 (PDT), Bret Cahill

We already have, and it works great.
John
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On Mon, 19 Oct 2009 14:58:53 -0700 (PDT), Bret Cahill

So sell your car and take the train.

Only hope? My car works just fine.

Unlikely. Batteries are expensive, short-lived, heavy, toxic, and slow to recharge. Roadbed electrification is absurd.
So, what do you drive?
John
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Ever try to deliver red leaf lettuce with a train?
Even more on point, driving "by the seat of your pants" isn't cute. It isn't romantic.
It's dangerous. It's a complete waste of brain cells' time.

Even if yours does others' don't.

Batteries can be much smaller and/or last much longer if they are infrequently used.

I just called up GEICO and told them it was in "storage." I only use it in emergencies.
Bret Cahill
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That goes a long way in explaining why you appear to know little to nothing about how vehicles and roads work in the real world.
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http://www.nature.org/initiatives/climatechange/calculator /
Some German study said everyone on the plant must get down to 2.5 tons/ year.
Bret Cahill
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On Tue, 20 Oct 2009 01:19:18 -0700 (PDT), Bret Cahill

Stop breathing. That will help me meet my quota.
John
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Renewables like food aren't included, or they are only included as far as the energy required to grow and transport the food.
Some algae can grow in petroleum. If that were used as food then (356 days/year)(8,000 BTU/day)/(16,000 BTU/lb) = 178 lbs carbon/year = 650 lbs CO2/year.
Bret Cahill
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On Tue, 20 Oct 2009 09:23:56 -0700 (PDT), Bret Cahill

There was an ecoloonie on NPR the other day, analysing the carbon footprint of browsing the Internet. He's concerned that clicking on a site may move disk heads somewhere halfway around the world and cause some power station to make more CO2. He figured that intensive web browsing generates about 1.5x the CO2 of the person sitting there clicking his mouse and breathing.
Think of how much more CO2 that person would generate if they got up and walked around or (gasp) ran or (even worse) cooked dinner.
John
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They tout all these low power consumption circuits, sleep mode etc., as though that's a drop in the bucket.
Maybe high efficiency is good for battery powered devices but if they think that'll save our fannies from peak oil they are bat crap crazy.
Bret Cahill
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On Tue, 20 Oct 2009 19:56:25 -0700 (PDT), Bret Cahill

Peak oil seems to always be off in the future. Recent discoveries in recovering oil and gas from shale have hugely multiplied likely reserves. And new drilling keeps finding more oil.
Good; I just bought a 3.3 liter V6.
John
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Actually it was a couple years ago.
One optimist called it "the long goodbye" but as it stands now we are looking at "a non Hollywood ending."

That'll be the end of the lower Colorado River.

The "proven reserves" are giving out much faster than expected wiping out anything from any new discoveries.

Better than a Hummer.
Bret Cahill
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