Nissan Looking At Roadbed Electrification

On Tue, 20 Oct 2009 20:10:35 -0700, John Larkin wrote:


Actually, it seems to have been about a year ago (July 2008, 74.82MBD). Unless oil prices skyrocket, that may well turn out to be the all-time peak.

Er, no. If anything, those discoveries are below what has been assumed by previous long-term predictions.

"Peak oil" doesn't mean "no more oil". It means that production costs are on a permanent upward trend as you have to expend ever increasing effort for a given amount of oil.

Look forward to paying $10/gallon within the vehicle's lifetime.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What has this to do with your lack of knowledge about how vehicles and roads work in the real world?
But since fires annually generate far more CO2 than all normal human activities, if you want to reduce CO2 levels, invest in firemen.
--
Jim Pennino

Remove .spam.sux to reply.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What does your question begging have to do with anything on this thread?

That's exactly what they are trying to do: put out the fires in the cylinders of your motor vehicle.
Bret Cahill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It goes to why your schemes to save the world are nonsense in the real world.

The point went over your head as usual.
The amount of CO2 generated by cars compared to the amount of CO2 generated by fires is so tiny is like an ant pissing in the Pacific Ocean.
If all the cars in the world dissapeared, you would hard pressed to be able to measure the difference.
And then there are volcanoes...
--
Jim Pennino

Remove .spam.sux to reply.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Forests -- including their fires -- are sustainable.
This falls under the same kind of ignorant scam argument as "but water vapor is a bigger greenhouse gas" and "but a lot of artic ice is refreezing right now . . ."

Depends on if the cars burned fossil fuels.

More of the usual ignorant talking points of deniers.
Why didn't you try the water vapor scam?
Saving that for later?
Bret Cahill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 Oct 2009 09:31:47 -0700 (PDT), Bret Cahill

You've got to catch me first, and I bet your car won't be able to catch my car.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They'll just tax it at the pump. They don't need to put out all the fire all the time.
Bret Cahill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 Oct 2009 14:36:46 -0700, John Larkin

--

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1c4QZGQw5o



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
'A report from the non-governmental organisation Global Witness famous for its expos of so-called "blood diamonds" pointed to an impending supply shock that could be so severe that many of the world's poor countries would simply be shut off from the world of energy by sky-high prices.
Two years in the preparation, Global Witness's report, Heads in the Sand, accused governments of ignoring the fact that the world could soon start to run short of oil. This would lead to huge consequences in terms of price shocks and much higher levels of violence around the world than last year's food riots.
"There is a train crash about to happen from an energy point of view. But politicians everywhere seem to have entirely missed the scale of the problem," said the report's author, Simon Taylor.
"We are all addicted to oil but if you look at the mathematics of the problem, they simply don't add up in terms of future supply and demand."
The report went through the latest figures from the oil industry and the Paris-based International Energy Agency, which last year drastically reduced its estimate of the available oil.
The IEA figures showed there could be a gap of 7m barrels a day between supply and demand by 2015. That represents about 8% of the expected world demand by then of 91m barrels a day.
The IEA expects production from existing oilfields to fall by 50% between now and 2020 and warned the world needs to find an additional 64m barrels a day of capacity by 2030 equivalent to six times current Saudi Arabian production.'
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 Oct 2009 19:50:53 -0700 (PDT), Bret Cahill

There's never a gap between supply and demand. There's just a price.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Depends on if the current is limited by a resistor and/or cap or by a circuit breaker.
A free marketeer might want to avoid a fuse if it's at all possible. I'm considering such a on/off solution but I'm not really happy about it.
Bret Cahill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2009/oct/19/oil-prices-rise-supply-warning-report
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.