Re: Two Types of Distributions Found In Nature



Ah, very good. So you are concerned that those few who have most of the bucks places the majority is actually below the median. Right? What difference does it make? If it true that the majority would be below the median, and then the money of the rich were redistributed, would it make a difference? Not for long. Prices would rise until purchasing power was diminished to the acceptable norm.
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No need to ask you if you are making less than average mean.
We already know you are dumber than a bowl of ramen noodles..
Bret Cahill
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wrote:

Now, hang on a minute. What flavor?
-- Roy L
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"pico" <pico.pico.pico> wrote:

That would be a neat trick! <g>
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"pico" <pico.pico.pico> wrote in message

It matters, because the distribution is skewed right because of fundamental injustices. The most salient being the collection of economic rent in general and land rent in particular.

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What is that one distribution in nature? The one that comes to mind for me is time until the next rainfall. When the weatherman reports in the morning that there is a 50% chance of rain during the daylight hours, he is estimating that the median time before the next rainfall is the time between then and dark. It would be very unusual for him to provide an estimate of the mean time before the next rainfall. I think that there are probably lots of similar things in nature, though. Which were you thinking of?

Yes, it is.
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Can you get data to plot the distribution?
Bret Cahill
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Yes.
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Can you tell us where we could find that data?
Bret Cahill
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National Weather Service. But I wouldn't expect it to be assembled in any useful form. It would be a LOT of work to examine a huge sample of recorded weather forecasts, looking for a statistically significant sample of reports like described above, and then finding the next rainfall for those locations.
And if you succeed, the voices will probably start screaming "HiltlerStalin Mao".
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Can you tell us the quantities that would be plotted on the x-y axis of the distribution?

Then why do you think anyone would believe that the average mean isn't as "meaningful" as the median?
Bret Cahill
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x: time to next rainfall y: frequency

The average median tells you a lot about the prospects for rain that day, while the average mean describes longer range weather patterns. One can do something relative to the current (decide whether to carry an umbrella), but little about the latter.
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frequency of what?

You don't believe the long term is important?

You couldn't invest in crop commodity futures?
I'd consider winning big with corn futures more important than having an umbrella on me.
Of course, that's just me.
A libertard who is just living by his wits and has no real future might find the umbrella more important.
Bret Cahill
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Rainfalls occurring at that duration since prediction.

Yes, I do.

I could, but I wouldn't based on expected mean time before next rainfall. Maybe based on expected mean amount of rainfall during the period that agriculture experts consider rainfall critical, or better (more useful) yet would be the probability that rainfall would be between the minimum and maximum that ag experts considered desirable for a strong crop.

If you want to bet on that based on expected mean time (or do you say "expected average mean time"?) to the next rainfall, good luck.

Probably.
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. . .

Then why do you think anyone would believe that the average mean isn't as "meaty" as the median?
. . .

Now you are suggesting that those who bet on corn futures are doing it without any statistical information whatsoever.
Anyway luck isn't the issue. In fact, winning isn't the issue either because losing money on corn futures a bigger issue than the umbrella.
The issue is, what is more important, the money involved in the corn futures or the umbrella?
Those who live by their wits and rely on silly word games can never have much interest in the long term.
But don't try to suggest that since _you_ don't think the long term is important, that _others_ have the same short term goals.
Bret Cahill
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You know, snipping the discussion of more meaningful statistics that I would use doesn't prevent anyone from looking at the previous message and seeing that this is a bald-faced lie.

Right, which is why I'd look at the other forecasts, not the mean time until the next rain.

Corn. That doesn't make the mean time until next rain more important than the median time to next rain.
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Bret Cahill wrote:

Who *doesn't* want to discuss the mean? The mean is the good news.
y = 34.856 Ln(x) + 1.2837
That's what a Web-found selection of US income data fits using Excel, x in units of $10,000 . It's also a CDF. The exponential distribution, which... most closely models arrival times for *Poisson processes*. Which would very closely correlate with how income works, doesn't it? "I got here first...."
Clearly, it has be bandlimited somehow to converge on 1 asymptopically, or just peter out when GDP is accounted for.
*IF* this holds, and I do mean *IF*, then the mean and median are related by the factor ln(2). Are they? Dunno. About, guessing from what I've seen. IOW, the ordinary-average guy can expect to see a growth rate about 70% that of the top dogs.
You might as well argue that water is wet or that the night is dark in that case. But you can't use advertising to releive the stress of a TV viewer with that story - gotta convince him he's being left behind, so the new sofa looks like a good investment...
-- Les Cargill
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Consider the idea that capital will necessarily be substituted for labor when wages are higher, all else equal. The falsity of this idea has been well-established for somewhere between a quarter to a half-century.
My paper's novelty is not in echoing this result.

The following is not on topic either:
"Explaining wages and employment by well-behaved supply and demand functions for labour is of doubtful logic." -- Robert L. Vienneau (2005). "On Labour Demand and Equilibria of the Firm", _Manchester School_, V. 73, N. 5 (Sep.): 612-619
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Whether strength of body or of mind, or wisdom, or virtue,
are found in proportion to the power or wealth of a man is
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wrote:

Now Rob is trying to cover up the inconsistency. He clearly says the traditional labor demand function is wrong but that the paper shows it can predict the amount of labor firms want to hire. So which is it Rob? Is the theory wrong or does it accurately predict how much labor firms want to hire? This is also a change from your paper shows the fact, as if it were your original idea. You are trying to contend both points. I suppose you are voting for Hillary who thinks giving illegals drivers licenses is a good idea but doesn't support doing so. Did you like Al Gore invent the internet too?
Rob again ignores the result of a long run labor demand function. When wages rise capital will increase but the effect on labor firms want to hire is undetermined. Why? Simply because capital is a determining factor of how much labor is hired, Increasing capital also increases the marginal value product of labor which is called the feedback effect. Therefore, one can not determine from theory alone if a rise in wages will, in the long run, increase, decrease or have no effect on the labor firms wish to hire. This supposed shocking revelation is not even a prediction of the model that Rob is shadow boxing with.

It is perfectly on the topic that you are liar who calls anyone who challenges you a liar. You are even lying about what is in your own publications. You can not find that the traditional labor demand function does not work yet that it can determine how much labor is hired. It is one or the other. You are lying if you claim that you prove that the traditional labor demand function does not work. Your abstract clearly says the results of your paper SAYS IT DOES WORK!!!
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This is _definitely_ off topic.
We need to discuss distributions in Nature where the ave. mean ain't important.
Bret Cahill
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