old device, need help running

I am a student doing biomedical research. My lab has an old impact
device that was previously used to conduct traumatic spinal chord
injuries. My current boss wants me to get it running, but I have never
seen something like this. It connects to a 386 DELL comp, which runs
Windows 3.1.
Here is a link that shows what it looks like:
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Can someone tell me what type of controler it uses, what program can be
used to run it?
Thanks
Reply to
ITatarintsev
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Well, lets just say you will be earning your money on this project.
Lets start with the simple parts. What is it connected to? sensors? motors of some kind? a switch? What sort of software is in the old computer? quick basic? labview a data acquisition program? Is this a home brew unit, or is it a supplied unit? Is there a manufacturer's name on it? Is there a commercial board inside the black box? What sort of board is used to talk to it? A/D, serial, parallel, DIIK?
I think it might be worth it to wind up the 386 and see what happens. (put those squirrels to work).
Please keep us posted. Google any big part numbers. There might be some sort of manual to be had.
Michael
Reply to
Herman Family
It is connected to motors (black round things) that raise and lower a metal rod.
The computer had no labview installed, and I didn't see any programs related to this device.
This is a custom built unit, and there is no power switch.
Is there a manufacturer's name on it? Nope
I already turned on the computer, but device doesn't respond.
Reply to
nea
You already identified the PC and the operating system. Now the application. Is there an executable? a source? is it written in assembler, fortran, pascal, C ?
Is there a maker's name for the system as a whole? This might be a fingerhold to get started. I couldn't tell if I was looking at an ethernet hook up or IEEE something.
Brian Whatcott Altus OK
Reply to
Brian Whatcott
Open the black box and try to determine what hardware is in there (on the PCB). Most likely you are dealing with a homebrew program that uses the parallel port to drive a stepper or servo motor.
Reply to
ms
Don't worry about software until you identify the hardware and all the interconnections between the devices external to the PC. Start from the motors and work back until you identify where the add-on stuff interfaces with the PC. Presumably some variation of: motors -> drives -> controller -> interface. Photos and any identifying markings on the various components would help.
Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
Ok, we're on the right track. Can you tell how many wires each mortor has? They are probably stepper motors.
Is it connected to anything else besides the motors? If not, we're looking at just some sort of motor controller.
The device won't respond to just turning on the computer. There is a program in there that runs it. Look for any programming language, especially quick basic, quick c (qb, qc), and look at the directory structure. Chances are there is a directory with some indication of the device. A program has to send data to the address of the board inside the computer to make anything happen.
Open the black box up, and look for a name on the internal board. It's probably something like TI, or Analog Devices.
Michael
Reply to
Herman Family
Dear nea:
...
Hopefully you don't mean the computer doesn't boot up...
It would be good to run "sysedit" and note what device drivers are loaded in config.sys, autoexec.bat, and in the [Run] section of win.ini.
Most likely, there will be an icon on the desktop that will trigger the application that drives/records what the system does.
David A. Smith
Reply to
N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc)
I would suggest starting with something more simple which doesn't have the ability to actually edit the files, as the OP sound like he lacks the basic knowledge of the old DOS system setup. If it's not backed up somewhere and it getting hosed it's gone forever. Something along the lines of:
TYPE autoexec.bat | more
should list the contents to the screen, IIRC. Piping the output through the more command, will parse screenfuls if the file contexts fill more than one screen. -- Ed Ruf ( snipped-for-privacy@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
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Reply to
Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!)
Dear Ed Ruf:
"Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!)" wrote in message news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com...
He said it was running Windows 3.1. You don't trust him to run "sysedit", but you do trust him at the DOS prompt? Hopefully he knows how to get there...
Agreed. A backup might be worthwhile.
TYPE config.sys | more TYPE \windows\win.ini | more
Yes, that is correct. And up until Win98, the More command actually worked to produce screenfulls rather than line-at-a-time.
David A. Smith
Reply to
N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc)
I finaly found info on this device. It is the MASCIS impactor, a custom made device by Wise Young et al back in the 1990s. It is now used by many labs to perform spinal chord injuries.
Here is a link that explains more
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Reply to
Igor
For the centennial of flight they tried to redo the Wright Bros. plane. They had drawings and money and every other advantage.
They failed.
There's something about technology that doesn't happen in the arts. Once it's gone it's GONE.
It may be easier to come up with something new or to convince patients that back pain isn't so bad.
Bret Cahill
Reply to
Bret Cahill
If that's what you think, then you don't know the full story. They didn't have the weather and the weather turned out to be quite important in the original flights. Particularly the winds.
-- Ed Ruf ( snipped-for-privacy@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
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Reply to
Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!)
and the temperature or better stated, the resulting density altitude. IIRC when they returned to Huffman prairie in Dayton the following summer their first ~50 flight attempts also failed and they did not become airborne until they developed their drop weight catapult.
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