How to make indium-bismuth alloy?

From the specs od Indalloy 162:
33.7% Bismuth, 66.3% Indium,
Melts at 72.3C.
I have 9999 indium wire and 1 ounce 9999 bismuth ingots and a balance scale
to get the proportions right. I have a solder pot which has never been used that heats up to 750 F. Can I simply put the metals into the pot and allow them to liquefy, then have an alloy that will melt/freeze at 72.3 C? Is it really that simple?
Best Regards, Arnold Beland www.atlasnova.com
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Arnold Beland wrote:

Please check the phase diagram first.
Michael Dahms
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Hello Michael, Thanks for the reply. I have tried to research the phase diagrams and I do not see the information necessarily applying to my purpose. I wish to use this alloy to simply fill a void between two pieces of brass in order to improve the thermal characteristics of a device.
The melting point of Indium is 156.61 C The melting point of Bismuth is 271.3 C
If I put the indium in the solder pot first and add the bismuth when it is molten, will this work? I readily admit to my status as ignoramus in metallurgical matters and this is my reason for asking the group for help.
Best Regards, Arnold Beland www.atlasnova.com
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Arnold Beland wrote:

Using the phase diagram, you can find the liquidus temperature of your alloy. Then, you can check, whether you are able to reach this temperature.
The next step: You should then check whether the alloy tends to react with your crucible. The last point is oxidation.
Michael Dahms
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There is always a risk that the metals oxidize so it would be good to have some protective atmosphere. There can also be a reaction with the crucible, you do not write what material it is. The phase diagram I have from the SGTE binary database indicates a bit lower temperature of the eutectic, about 70 C. One of the solid phases formed at the eutectic will transform at 50C when cooling but if I remember correctly the two phases on the In side are very similar so ther should not be any significant change in the properties. I have no idea how these phases behave mechanically but the alloy is probably rather brittle.
Bosse
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wrote:

There is always a risk that the metals oxidize so it would be good to have some protective atmosphere. There can also be a reaction with the crucible, you do not write what material it is. The phase diagram I have from the SGTE binary database indicates a bit lower temperature of the eutectic, about 70 C. One of the solid phases formed at the eutectic will transform at 50C when cooling but if I remember correctly the two phases on the In side are very similar so ther should not be any significant change in the properties. I have no idea how these phases behave mechanically but the alloy is probably rather brittle.
Bosse
The pot is stainless steel and I will keep the temp below 175 C. The mechanical properties of the resulting alloy is of no consequence, I only need it to conduct heat.
Best Regards, Arnold Beland www.atlasnova.com
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