How to make indium-bismuth alloy?

From the specs od Indalloy 162:
33.7% Bismuth, 66.3% Indium,
Melts at 72.3°C.
I have 9999 indium wire and 1 ounce 9999 bismuth ingots and a balance scale
to get the proportions right. I have a solder pot which has never been used
that heats up to 750 F. Can I simply put the metals into the pot and allow
them to liquefy, then have an alloy that will melt/freeze at 72.3 C? Is it
really that simple?
Best Regards,
Arnold Beland
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Arnold Beland
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Hello Michael, Thanks for the reply. I have tried to research the phase diagrams and I do not see the information necessarily applying to my purpose. I wish to use this alloy to simply fill a void between two pieces of brass in order to improve the thermal characteristics of a device.
The melting point of Indium is 156.61 º C The melting point of Bismuth is 271.3 º C
If I put the indium in the solder pot first and add the bismuth when it is molten, will this work? I readily admit to my status as ignoramus in metallurgical matters and this is my reason for asking the group for help.
Best Regards, Arnold Beland
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Reply to
Arnold Beland
There is always a risk that the metals oxidize so it would be good to have some protective atmosphere. There can also be a reaction with the crucible, you do not write what material it is. The phase diagram I have from the SGTE binary database indicates a bit lower temperature of the eutectic, about 70 =B0C. One of the solid phases formed at the eutectic will transform at 50=B0C when cooling but if I remember correctly the two phases on the In side are very similar so ther should not be any significant change in the properties. I have no idea how these phases behave mechanically but the alloy is probably rather brittle.
Bosse
Reply to
bosse
There is always a risk that the metals oxidize so it would be good to have some protective atmosphere. There can also be a reaction with the crucible, you do not write what material it is. The phase diagram I have from the SGTE binary database indicates a bit lower temperature of the eutectic, about 70 °C. One of the solid phases formed at the eutectic will transform at 50°C when cooling but if I remember correctly the two phases on the In side are very similar so ther should not be any significant change in the properties. I have no idea how these phases behave mechanically but the alloy is probably rather brittle.
Bosse
The pot is stainless steel and I will keep the temp below 175 C. The mechanical properties of the resulting alloy is of no consequence, I only need it to conduct heat.
Best Regards, Arnold Beland
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Reply to
Arnold Beland
Using the phase diagram, you can find the liquidus temperature of your alloy. Then, you can check, whether you are able to reach this temperature.
The next step: You should then check whether the alloy tends to react with your crucible. The last point is oxidation.
Michael Dahms
Reply to
Michael Dahms

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