A putzy little metal project

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Very nice welds Don. Looks like a pleasure to hold.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus11104
On Tue, 01 Dec 2009 23:20:48 -0600, the infamous Don Foreman scrawled the following:
Hey, nice! You're weighting it down with those little welding beads if I'm not mistaken.
-- Some days, it's not even worth chewing through the restraints.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Well thanks, Ig. I'm not proud of the welds, but they'll serve. They're MIG welds. I can do much better with TIG, but I'm still a bit antsy about that. I'm comfy with using MIG with my ICD (implanted cardiac defibrillator) but I'm still not quite sure about E-field of the starting voltage on TIG triggering my ICD. I still need to contrive a Faraday vest. No biggie, just haven't yet got around to it. It'd be a sewing project. I really would like to get back to TIG if I can but the notion of a 47-joule 750-volt mule-kick-to-chest is an experience I'd rather skip if it's not necessary to keep me vertical for a bit longer.
Recall that last January I was told to fuggedabout any form of electric welding for the rest of my life. Not bloody freakin' likely...
Reply to
Don Foreman
Yeh yeh, pile it on. I'm still makin' stuff that works.
Reply to
Don Foreman
DON'T paint them blue!
Reply to
Buerste
Nice.
Can you tell us more about your zinc plating?
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Nice Job Don! I'd like a little more info on the zinc plating as well. You seem to have a good handle on it!
Pete
Reply to
Pete Snell
Great "how-to" piece in the Foreman standard. Thanks for sharing ! Bob Swinney
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Reply to
Robert Swinney
On Wed, 02 Dec 2009 01:39:39 -0600, the infamous Don Foreman scrawled the following:
I knew you'd understand.
-- Follow the path of the unsafe, independent thinker. Expose your ideas to the dangers of controversy. Speak your mind and fear less the label of 'crackpot' than the stigma of conformity. And on issues that seem important to you, stand up and be counted at any cost. -- Thomas J. Watson
Reply to
Larry Jaques
See
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Rather than buying the kit, you can just buy the concentrate, an anode, and some zinc brightener, and supply your own bucket etc. Dawn and Soft-scrub are excellent degreasers. I don't use heaters or agitators. I might get better results if I did, but I'm satisfied with the results I get: stuff doesn't rust!
Reply to
Don Foreman
Thanks Don! I'll investigate that a little more. You using a battery charger for the power supply?
Pete
Reply to
Pete Snell
No, but a battery charger with a variac and current meter would work. Zinc doesn't take much current for small pieces. Figure 30 milliamps per square inch of workpiece.
I think there are instructions on Caswell's online plating manual for building a current regulator. If you can't find them, I can provide -- it's my design.
Reply to
Don Foreman
Show a link to that, Don.
Reply to
cavelamb
You're right, that isn't much current (for anything that would fit in a 5 gallon bucket) ;-) I think I could rig something up. Thanks for the info Don.
Pete
D>
Reply to
Pete Snell
Looks like it isn't there anymore. Sorry 'bout that. I'll email you something from my archive. Let me know if you'd like further assistance.
Reply to
Don Foreman
I responded to your request in good faith by sending some design documents to your posted Email addy. I got an automated reply inviting me to be a supplicant for the favor of your attention by filling out a form and authenticating a graphic. I don't care to interact that way so I think we're done here.

Reply to
Don Foreman
I don't suppose you could put the circuit in the dropbox, Don?
The OP isn't the only one watching this thread.
Reply to
IanM
This is a simple current regulating circuit:
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A speaker fader pot is about the right resistance to make it adjustable.
In practice the device works as well or better wired as a voltage regulator with an ammeter in series, because smooth-operating higher resistance pots are much easier to find.
The simplest and cheapest current regulator is a light bulb. The resistance of the filament increases with its temperature such that ten times the voltage can draw only 2 or 3 times the current. They are cheap and locally available in a range of values. Buy some spare brake, turn and marker bulbs for your car and check them with a battery charger and meter:
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The Variac (adjustable autotransformer) and rectifier circuit is much more efficient if that matters to you since current regulators can waste half or more of the input DC voltage. The problem is the high cost and low availability of Variacs. I suppose you could try a lamp dimmer instead, tell us the results if you do. The lamp dimmers I have don't operate smoothly at low output levels.
I prefer adjustable lab supplies. The 5A Caswell one looks good for the price:
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in my experience low-cost lab supplies (other brands) aren't too reliable. I haven't fried this one yet:
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They are also useful for testing electronic components and charging batteries, especially old lead-acids that fail on automatic chargers and need a higher voltage to break down sulfation. I like to use supplies with built-in meters for this instead of having a rats nest of clip leads to separate meters, all hooked to a battery with enough power to make them burn or explode if they short.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Whats wrong with blue? That is the company color for our painted products.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes

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