A little metal crank

I made a little metal crank to replace a broken one on a lathe.
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Reply to
Don Foreman
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Beautiful job, Don!
Whose nickle-plating process did you use, Caswell's? It came out looking great!
Dave
Reply to
LowEnergyParticle
Just for *once* I'd like to see you make something really CRAPPY looking and almost totally unusable.... Ken.
Reply to
Ken Sterling
Nice job! Now I need to do exactly the same thing for mine. It's been stuck together with a screw and epoxy for 30+ years. Bugs
Reply to
Bugs
On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 11:46:39 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm, Ken Sterling (Ken Sterling) quickly quoth:
Ken, you should take deep satisfaction in the knowledge that he misspelled "nickel" on that page. Enjoy!
Reply to
ljaques
Yes, Caswell's stuff. Electroplated, not electroless.
Reply to
Don Foreman
Welllll....there are two sources of metal in my shop, the rawstock rack and the awshit box....
Reply to
Don Foreman
Don, very nice. How did you nickel plate them?
i
Reply to
Ignoramus13782
Beautiful work! how did you shape the handle?
T.Alan
Reply to
T.Alan Kraus
I used Caswell's nickel-plating chemicals and nickel anode at 50 mA per square inch of workpiece. The stuff looks a bit pricey, but it seems to last forever. I've been using this same batch for at least 7 years.
Reply to
Don Foreman
Freehand, on the lathe. Turned a little of it, did the rest with file and strip abrasive paper. It may sound tedious but in fact it only takes a few minutes, particularly with brass.
Shoulda made it bigger, oh well.
Reply to
Don Foreman
I wasn't quite clear here. The handle was made in two parts. One part is the ball and stem that joins the hub. I made the balls on a mill with a boring head and tilted indexing head. Then I drilled the little ball .312 x about .200 deep (2-flute end mill, flat bottomed hole), made the little perpendicular handle freehand, and silverbrazed a little turned stud on the end of the handle into the hole in the ball.
Lesson learned: clamp lightly before brazing. (I just used gravity) The air in the hole must have expanded and pushed it out a bit before the brazing alloy froze. That's why the fillet isn't perfectly smooth. I didn't have that problem with the other two joints perhaps because they didn't fit as snugly or there was a route for trapped air (or steam from flux) to escape.
BTW, re recent discussions of propane vs O/A for silverbrazing: The two joints on opposite sides of the 3/4" dia hub were made with the same brazing material (Easy-Flo 45) at different times. The concentrated heat of O/A allowed me to have the second joint made before the other side of the hub got hot enough to soften the previous joint. Can't do that with propane, gotta use different brazing materials of different melting points.
Reply to
Don Foreman
Even if the parts have generous clearance, the flux will often flow in and seal the piston, so it *still* self-disassembles!
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
Very Nice! It always amazes me of the talent on this site. Good Job.
Reply to
Mike
Ok, I admit that when I saw the header I was wondering WHO you were writing about...just the way my mind works. So, disapointedly, I opened the link.
Well, what a nice piece of true art! I was probably a joy to do, wasn't it?:
Reply to
Tom Gardner
It is even more interesting when you consider his talent for design and analysis of electronics. Everything he does is better than excellant.
Jerry
Reply to
Jerry Martes
It's fun for sure when something turns out OK. Maybe it's more fun because they don't always turn out well so it's sweet when they do.
Every time I use the buffer I think of the creativity and perceptiveness that children have before it's "educated" out of them if parents allow that to happen. A little neighbor girl, about 4, insatiably curious and bright as a new dime, wandered into my shop on a summer day when all the doors were open. Ally knew the rules here: gotta mind Don or ya can't come in. I get nothing done when Ally is here because I don't dare take my eye off of her for a second. I don't mind, for a little while anyway. She's curious and rather bold for a tyke. I like that about her. She does mind cheerfully and well, but if nobody told her specifically not to push this button or that......
She wondered what that green machine did. So I gave her a face shield to hold (too big for her to wear), positioned her and myself safely (buffers have a way of grabbing and throwing), and showed her what it does. Then I pointed to the buttons. "See, the red button makes it stop. The letters on it say O-F-F because it turns the machine off, makes it stop. You know that red lights mean stop, right?" She nodded vigorously. "What do you suppose the letters on the green button say, Ally?" She hit me with her 300-watt grin and said, without an instant of hesitation, "SHINEY!"
Bingo for Ally! Made me wanna re-label the green button.
Reply to
Don Foreman
I beg to differ. Hard soldering (silverbrazing) is a primary process in the manufacture of handmade jewellery; something I've been doing for over 40 years. I frequently need to solder _very_ close to an existing joint (a few millimetres) and have observed that the new solder melts before the old stuff, even though its in the same propane flame. The difference is not great but its certainly there. The process of melting the solder changes seems to change its characteristics and raise its melting point. I use this property a great deal and seldom use different grades of solder.
Reply to
Gary Wooding
I had a scary experience, years ago, silver brazing a snug fitting stud into a blind hole drilled into a piece of stainless. I had put water soluble flux into the hole, pressed the stud into it and was heating it up to make the braze flow. The stud flew out of the stainless work held in a vice with a bang, past my head and embedded itself in a ceiling beam. Now I always drill a breathing/venting hole when possible.
cheers T.Alan
Reply to
T.Alan Kraus
Have you ever used their electroless nickel ? How would you rate one over the other (if you have) ?
Reply to
Andy Dingley

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