Advice needed on Walker-Turner drill press

I just had a quick look at a Walker-Turner floor standing drill press
and I'm trying to decide whether to buy it.
The model number is "1316 32", SN 0000024. On the side of the
headstock casting, it's embossed with what looks like "1DP700". It has
a 4 step pulley, no speed reducer. The column looks like 2 1/4"
diameter. I think it's a 1/2 hp motor, but there's a scratch through
the label so I can't be 100% sure.
The machine has been mostly idle for years, so it's got surface rust
over it all, but it seems to run fine. With about 3" of drill bit out
of the chuck, there was no visibly noticable runout. Everything works,
but I'm sure it could use a decent restoration.
Can someone let me know the size (looks like maybe 15", but I'm not
sure). When would it have been made? What's it worth?
Many thanks,
Bruno (brunoh at pacbell dot net)
Reply to
Bruno
Loading thread data ...
You can easily measure the size with a tape measure. The size of a DP is the distance from the upright column to the center of the drill chuck, times 2. If it's a 15" drill press that distance will be 7-1/2".
You can often get comparative pricing from ebay.
I wouldn't pay more than $150 for it. It's old, US and cast iron, but it won't have a lot of features you might want.
Check out
formatting link
for a few tips on buying a drill press.
GWE
Bruno wrote:
Reply to
Grant Erwin
What kind of features might it not have?
UA100
Reply to
Unisaw A100
I forgot to measure it when I saw it -- I was hoping someone would know based on the model.
I can get it for a little less than that, but still a hard job convincing myself. I've got an old K-S Craftsman 150 which is very nice, but a bench model and I'd really prefer a floor standing model. Also, neither has the speed reducer, which would be better for metal working. So, maybe not worth the trade (which is what it would basically be).
What other features are you thinking?
Reply to
Bruno
Lazers!
Reply to
Joe Wells
Morse taper spindle, table raising/lowering crank, quill stops, jackshaft (center pulley so you go from one belt to two) for more speeds, integral work light, slotted table, things like that. These are all standard on the modern import drill presses. And you will use every one of them. You can certainly get by without them, too, of course.
Grant
Reply to
Grant Erwin
that all important laser guidance system, of course....
Reply to
bridger
Not all modern imports have MT spindles, you're right about the table crank, I've never seen a DP _without_ depth stops, jackshafts can be added, I've never used a work light but it's easy enough to add, and most midrange modern imports have tables with similar slotting to the old ones.
What you get with a vintage drill press is a really well made, solid machine that's easy to play around with. I can't get used to new ones now that I have a couple real oldies.
GTO(John)
Reply to
GTO69RA4
I don't recognize the model number, but I have a WT 900 from the '50s. I've had it for around 25 years and I used one just like it in production over 30 years ago, drilling many thousands of holes with it in aluminum and steel.
Mine is still going strong, although I will have to replace the bearings soon, if I can figure out how. The model I have does have provision for a jackshaft and I have one I bought at the time I got the drill press.
Since they were built less than 5 miles from my home, I have a warm spot for them. The shops in this area are loaded with old WT's.
Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
According to a catalog I have, a 1316-32 is a Standard Speed, Bench Model with a 6" spindle travel. BTW the motor is standard at 1/2 hp.
What shape is the floor base? Floor models were round, Bench models, rectangular. It could have been converted..
Tom
Reply to
Tom
Walker Turner is good iron. They tended to use nonstandard bearings. Shrug
If you need speeds from slooooww to FZT!!! stick on a 3/4hp 3ph motor and pick up a cheap VFD from Ebay. Dial your speed and for really low end low rpm torque, simply change the belt on the pulley. This gives you infinite speeds at all torque ranges.
Gunner
"In my humble opinion, the petty carping levied against Bush by the Democrats proves again, it is better to have your eye plucked out by an eagle than to be nibbled to death by ducks." - Norman Liebmann
Reply to
Gunner
The Walker Turner I have does indeed have a jackshaft. It's just visible in the photo, above the top of the column - flipped upside down though, because I wasn't using it when I took the photo:
IMO that machine is a real industrial workhorse. No way I could ever wear it out in my lifetime of hobby use. Of course it has depth stops, the worklight is a compact fluorescent that's mounted off to the side in a reflector fixture. The table's slotted but there's no crank for elevating it. That's the one luxury I sort of miss.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
Bruno wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
I have a benchtop model at the end of my welding table. If it sounds good, runs good, little run out, I'd buy it for $150 any day over an import. MANY easy upgrades you can do to it, Jackshaft, VFD etc. If it has a Morse taper spindle you can easily put a nice chuck on it....mine had a JT33 with locking collar, wasn't hard to find a good chuck for it, but not as easy as a MT spindle
Marty
Reply to
Marty Escarcega
Thanks to all who responded here.
Thanks, Tom for spotting this in the catalog. The one I saw had the large round floor model base. I did measure the column and was surprized that it was 2 1/4" diameter, not 2 3/4".
I contacted the seller and he measured the spindle to column at 8 1/2", but I don't see that there was a 17" model then, so I'm not sure where he measured (maybe to center of column).
The machine was posted for sale locally at $150 (in "mint condition") but when I saw it there was light to medium rust all over it. We live near the ocean, so that had me concerned. While it worked, it would still benefit from serious cleanup and I had to consider all the effort for that. He offered to sell if for 100 if I'd take it then, but something held me back. Anyway, he later had someone commit for $125 and gave me first right of refusal back at $150. I said no.
Thanks, Grant, for getting me to think about other features. One of the things that really held me back in the first place was the lack of speed reducer (since I do metal work). But I realize now that a cranking table would be very good to have.
-Bruno
Reply to
Bruno
Lots of the older shops that still have WTs have put in a small crank and pulley to lift/lower the tables. Very easy to do. Some use a counterweight inside the vertical support.
Gunner
"In my humble opinion, the petty carping levied against Bush by the Democrats proves again, it is better to have your eye plucked out by an eagle than to be nibbled to death by ducks." - Norman Liebmann
Reply to
Gunner
The South Bend I have here at work has a strange lever widget that ratchets the table up. The machine at home is pretty small so I don't mind armstronging the table up. I just have to remember to take off the heavy vise if it's on the table, first.
The cable/winch or counterweight idea is cute though.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
I hate to say it, but you really missed out on that. Prices vary by location but I'd be driving home right now with that DP if I could get one for $100. Jackshafts are easy things to make.
GTO(John)
Reply to
GTO69RA4
I omitted the obvious, it is listed as a 15" machine..
Tom
Reply to
Tom
I omitted the obvious, it is listed as a 15" machine..
Tom
Reply to
Tom
Based on the motor and column size, it's probably a 15" machine. It's easy to determine by measuring from the tip of the chuck to the column; if that measures around 7.5", then it's a 15" (swing) machine. In MHO it may be worth around $100 to $200 depending on the OA condition. My guess on age would be 50's or early 60's. Good luck, John
Reply to
JMLATHE

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.