Advice on bit type?

For quite a while now I have been trying to find letter size bits that will drill well in thin materials, such as 1/16" aluminum. It's hard
enough to find fractional sizes, but DeWalt pilot point seem to work best. However, I have not been able to find a letter size that will work. I believe the problem is that the bit doesn't have enough thickness to center off well in material this thin. Trust me, I've tried it all and it comes down to this. I need something that will drill one hole without having to use multiple steps.
I'm wondering if anyone thinks these would work?
http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/NNPDFF?PMPAGE•&PMT4NO‚207504&PMT4TP=*ITPD&PMITEMy892543&PMCTLGT
Just hoping for an opinion before I blow money on yet another bit to try. It sounds like it may be designed to solve the problem though. I would ask the manufacturer, but I can't find a contact for Hertel.
Thanks,
Dave
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Hertel was acquired by Kennametal in 1993. http://www.kennametal.com/en-US/company_profile/history_page.jhtml Contact information is on this page: http://www.kennametal.com/en-US/customer_support/contact_us_main.jhtml
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I've been drilling 1/16" 6061 for decades without much trouble. I back it with plywood, hold the metal down so it doesn't jump and use 135 degree points if available.
jsw
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On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 03:31:04 -0700 (PDT), Dave D

When I click the link I get the cover of the MSC catalog.
Thank You, Randy
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Another alternative is to use a hand punch, if the work is within the envelope of the punch. I've made custom-sized punch and die sets out of drill rod, not rocket science, usually an afternoon's project. Certainly a lot faster than drilling and no burrs.
Letter drill sizes are pretty much confined to making the larger machine-screw tap-sized holes, so not a lot of demand for different types, you might find a better selection of tip types in metric equivalents.
Stan
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On Mar 23, 11:43 am, snipped-for-privacy@prolynx.com wrote:

This type is nice:
http://home.flash.net/~dgjco/rw218apic.jpg
Or the big one:
http://www.sheetmetalequip.com/newequipment/newfullpics/turret.jpg
I had a Rotax one in my model shop at MITRE.
You can make custom drill bits out of drill rod by milling it to a D shape in cross-section and turning or grinding a blunt cone on the end. They work like step drills, cutting smoothly but not real fast. If not hardened and kept sharp they may raise a burr on the back.
jsw
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Thanks guys... I guess I'll email the parent company.
Sorry, forgot to mention these are drilling in tubes, so punching or putting something behind it is out. The metric bits is a good idea, but looks like none come very close. I tried to sharpen bits for this, but didn't get it quite right.
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