Advice Please: Mini-Machines

Is there some sort of mini-lathe or mini-mill I can get that would help me in creating/shaping small parts?
I'll be using metal as well as plastic stock, and don't know if there
are small machines that I could use for both.( And perhaps wood also).
Any advice would be appreciated.
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This site should give you all you need to get started:
http://www.mini-lathe.com/Mini_mill/Main/mini-mill.htm
I purchased the Harbor Freight mini mill and have been pleased with it.
John
On 29 Oct 2005 16:14:34 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@mail.con.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

"Small" is a relative word. Perhaps you should give some max dimensions for the size of parts you wish to make.
But assuming you mean parts that are no more than several inches in any dimension, you should look at the mini-lathe and the mini-mill reviewed on this Web site:
http://www.mini-lathe.com/
You should also pay a visit to LittleMachineShop.com:
http://www.littlemachineshop.com/
It's not recommended to try to use the same machines for both metal and wood (although metal and plastic are usually fine). Firstly, a machine that is designed to work metal, will not have the features and proper speeds needed to work wood (and vice versa). Secondly, the oils/coolants used from metalworking will stain if they get on your wood. Thirdly, the chips, dust, and pitch from working wood may gum up your metalworking machines.
- Michael
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi, Search on ebay for "mini mill -wood". Type it in the search block without the quotes. Make sure you type in the -wood, otherwise you will end up with a gazillion wood lathes in the search. I found mine from the Cummins Tool Company. I think it was $299 and shipping. I've been extremely happy with it so far. Granted, it probably isn't as precise as a higher dollar machine, but for me just learning, it works great. Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mj wrote:

Thanks everyone for the links.
I'm a total newbie also. And since I will be working with a variety of materials, I thought I'd attempt to get a begginers all-in-one machine for small projects.(I know that that is asking for a lot).
I was looking at the Central Machinery(Harbor Freight Tools) and MicroLux(Micro-Mark) lathes, but if recommendations(brand & model) for a mini lathe that can take a milling attachment would be appreciated.
Thanks a lot.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Some of the machines sold by Micro-Mark appear to be identical to those sold by Harbor Freight, except for the brand name. Harbor Freight usually has more variety and lower prices. I own a micro-mill from HF that I use for making small parts for scale models, and other miscellaneous jobs. It works OK for the type of parts I make (detailed, but not necessarily functional), but I'd want something more accurate and with less backlash in the table for making high-precision functional parts.
Even though you say space is at a premium, make sure you get a machine with enough capacity for the parts you want to make. My lathe is limited to 7 inches between centers, which sounded more than adequate for the type of parts I was planning to make. However, when you take into account the length of holding fixtures such as a steady rest for turning slender parts, or the chuck and drill bit for center boring, the length of parts you can actually make can be very limited. Again, think about the type of parts you plan to make and how they need to be fixtured before you commit to a machine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@mail.con.com wrote:

There are many small lathes and mills out there. Be aware though that these machines are often poor choices, even for "small" parts. They lack the mass and rigidity of larger machines, and by the time you purchase tooling for them, the savings is not that great. If at all possible, I'd recommend you look at a step up in size, or maybe even purchase something used, before spending several hundred dollars on what is essentially a toy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tim Killian wrote:

Well, this won't be for commercial use. Just to make parts for some ideas I've been working on.(I'm an amateur inventor).
(And I was looking for used ones, on Ebay).
Also, space is a really big issue, so going big wouldn't be plausible.
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@mail.con.com wrote:

I'm not suggesting you buy a 5000 pound bed mill. But it might be wiser to start with a bench top mill-drill instead of one of those Sherline mini-mills that weigh about 10 pounds soaking wet.
Another option is to forget about making the parts yourself, and instead find a machinist who will do them for you. There are lots of experienced people who have their own shops and can make parts at reasonable prices. Your time is a valuable commodity -- don't waste it unnecessarily.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 30 Oct 2005 17:29:09 -0700, Tim Killian

Darren, there are a glut of choices out there now, and witn most of them, you will probably be able to do most small work. The mini lathes, which I take to mean the 7X10 and similar can do very respectable work but require a lot of work to set them up properly before you can take the first cut. I'm guessing about three hours, maybe more for someone that isn't familiar with lathes and how to make them run properly. Doesn't really matter who you buy them from, the only difference is in the color and the prices for the most part.
Mills, there are more than a few choices, and while the Sherline, Taig and similar are very small, those two are also very precise. The sherline maybe a bit more power than the machine itself can handle, but that can be lived with easily enough. They're small, but you're knocking right around 100 pounds and handling them by yourself isn't a good idea, they weren't made to be carried around. Others, the China mini mills, with R-8 collet system can be made to do very good work, but only if you can get the thing squared up, which sometimes isn't really intuitive. They're somewhat larger than the Taig or Sherline, which isn't bad, and cheaper, but the price doesn't include the collets and a vise, the former which it's useless without the later which is the one you'll use the most. The mill drill is still larger, you're looking at between 300 - 700 pounds and 1 - 2 horse motor, if you're an apartment dweller, both would be considerations.

I've been that route, running back and forth from the machinist to the project can eat a lot more time than making it yourself. Owning your own machine is only 1000 X better. Machinists also enjoy getting paid, something I consider a more valuable commodity than my time.
Rich
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Richard wrote:

...
... Bed length is a common difference -- The HF version is 7X10 while Homier's is 7x12 IIRC at the same price except for shipping, and http://www.varmintal.com/alath.htm mentions a MicroLux 7x14. -jiw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
To claify what I need a small lathe and possibly mill for, my first project will require that I work with corrosion resistant materials that tend to retain their shape over time.
I'll probably go with stainless steel, because aluminum tends to warp. And Delrin would be my choice over nylon, because it is easier to machine.
The goal is to create a 3" diameter circular trough in the center of the 4" x 4", 3/8" thick metal plate. THis trough will be 3/8" wide, and 1/4" deep, so that it can hold 3/8" ball bearings.(A smaller 1-1/4" hole all the way through the plate will be created in the center of that).
As for the Delrin, which will also be 3/8" thick, I'll need to be able to create strategically placed holes and slots all the way through it.
Thanks a lot.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I certainly would not recommend SS as the first material you learn to machine! There are many different types of SS; Some machine a little harder than regular steel and some are just plain nasty! Mcmaster Carr has some pretty good info in their catalog.
I also think it would be wise for you get get some advice on what is the best material for your project before deciding that you need SS.
Why do you say aluminum warps? Are you subjecting it to thermal stress cycles?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Seconded. You can ultimately build using anything you want, but learning on alumunium will save you time and probably money.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.