Bought a rotary table

snip---->


If you mean on a permanent basis, I would suggest that it should not be mounted such. It's too inconvenient not having access to both ends of the slots of your mill, for one, plus it will be in the way more than you can imagine. It will become a chip catcher and make cleaning the slots in your mill more difficult. You'd probably have to relocate the table to use it when you needed it, so you're far better off to store it on a bench that is very near table height, and close to the table of the mill. I store my rotab that way----so all I have to do to mount it on the mill is to slide it off the table far enough to wipe the edge clean, pick it up and move it ever so slightly to the mill table, wipe the balance of the base clean and slide it in position. It's not easy, but it's far easier than fighting with rotab being in the way when I use the mill. You'll come to realize that while a rotab is a very important accessory for manual milling, it doesn't get used a lot.
Harold
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Harold, OK, I will keep it on my shop table on casters. You have made good points.
i
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Ignoramus32024 wrote:

I simply would try it. But maybe that's too complicated for you.
Nick
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On Fri, 25 May 2007 22:08:32 -0500, Ignoramus32024

What happens 2 minutes after you mount it vertically and horizontally?
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Don Foreman wrote:

He'll get his first degree in understanding machining.
Nick
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Brought it home. The seller did not bother to mention numerous pockmarks from drilling. The table itself, however, functions well and has about 3 minutes backlash and 30 second resolution (with the vernier scale).
I have quite a few tee nuts that fit this table. (3/8" thread)
i
On Fri, 25 May 2007 22:08:32 -0500, Ignoramus32024

http://www.emachinetool.com/accessories/catalog/large.cfm?OptionCatID=Rotary%20Tables%20 (Manual%20%26%20Power%20Feed)&OptionFamilyID9
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Ignoramus14053 wrote:

The pock marks make it lighter to pick up... :)
John
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On Wed, 30 May 2007 21:14:36 -0500, Ignoramus14053

Sometimes this works to your advantage. You don't really mind doing questionable things with it that you wouldn't have the heart to do with a new table.
I've got/inherited a few tools like this and I probably get more use out of them than the new ones. If the price was commensurate with the condition don't fret it.
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
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I agree, yes. By the way, I was incorrect -- the accuracy is 30 seconds, the resolution is a lot lower.

Yes, I do not feel as though I overpaid too much.
i
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On Thu, 31 May 2007 12:27:27 -0500, Ignoramus17636

Lower, as in, resolution is LESS seconds than accuracy. The vernier scale is easy to use and has 5 seconds graduation.
i
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@NOSPAM.17636.invalid says...

5' => 5 *minutes*, or a bit better than .010" resolution at the table's diameter.
Ned Simmons
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Ned, I will check again tonight. I think that the table is marked as follows: the 12" diameter scale is graduated in degrees, 0 to 360. The handle is graduated in minutes. Every turn of the handle turns the table by 4 degrees. So on the handle, there are four quadrants, one degree in each quadrant, and every degree has markings for every minute. (60 markings in every quadrant). Then, there is also a vernier scale that is stationary next to the handle, marked for every five seconds. The mark that coincides with the degree marking, gives you the second reading.
I am going by memory and may be mistaken, as I often am.
i
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@NOSPAM.17636.invalid says...

I just checked, 4 degrees per turn, 5 minutes per graduation direct, 15 seconds on the vernier. So much for *my* memory.
Ned Simmons
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Exactly like my table.
i
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wrote:

Indeed. Dings and pits mean squat in use. Give it a gentle once-over with a nice big flat abrasive stone to get the high spots and put it to use.
Gunner
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There are no high spots, only low spots.
Gunner, do you think that a chuck with a mounting plate would be the right way to use this table? I think that this table would be perfect to use for making it's own mounting plate.
i
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wrote:

You won't always use a chuck----some parts don't lend themselves to being held that way. Just make sure that what ever you make to adapt the chuck you intend to use will be self registering, so you don't have to spend time screwing around with the setup.
If the center hole of your table is straight (that's the only thing I accept, I don't like tables with a tapered hole), you can include a short spud on the adapter plate so when you drop the chuck on, it's already concentric with the table. Use a plate that's thick enough to counterbore the SHCS's you'll use to engage the T nuts---so there's no protrusions on the plate once it's mounted. It looks a lot nicer than exposed nuts. I used a piece of 1" aluminum for mine, which works fine.
Harold
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Yes, it is a straight hole indeed, I called Troyke and asked. I will do as you say, wrt the "spud".

OK, I will look around for a suitable plate.
i
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On Thu, 31 May 2007 14:05:01 -0500, Ignoramus17636

Troyke rotary table? OOOOOOO!!! Good shit Maynard!
Gunner
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It does look like it is in a good working shape... I found a bag of allen screws yesterday, some would fit the bridgeport nuts and some would fit the Troyke nuts.
i
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