Bowling ball muller?

I've run into a problem with easily re-conditioning my foundry sand...
I've been using a mini-carver design for fresh batches, but it's nearly
useless for reconditioning.
I'm toying with using a bowling ball in a regular cement mixer with the
vanes removed.
Anybody here have some actual experience????
Replacing the exact right amount of water after a pour seems more of an art
than a science...
So far I'm an expert on too much or too little... just right remains
elusive...
Chet
Reply to
Chet
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Check out the archives at the yahoo group castinghobby . This subject has been mulled over repeatedly ... pun intended .
Reply to
Snag
Thanks, Snag. Checked it out... Looks like the wrong way to go...
Reply to
Chet
Which carver do you have ? There are plans out there for a blade type made from an old propane tank , which I intend to build when I have both time and inclination .
Reply to
Snag
The carver I built is based on rotating a 5 gal bucket with 1/2 hp motor using belts to reduce the rpms... A frame holds a shaft with a pair of curved 'carvers' that can be adjusted in height. At first I really liked the system because you can mix the sand and clay and get a great mix. You then add water until the 'green sand' starts forming in sheets. A compression test at this point reveals good detail and a clean break. But using the carver for reconditioning is a different story... too much clumping and stalling...
Reply to
Chet
Are you screening your sand to break up the big chunks ? 1/4" hardware cloth on a frame similar to a deep flask works very well for this . Also , I've found that if I mix my sand up in the bucket , chunks and all , then come back later after the moisture has had time to equalize a bit that the chunks are lots easier to break up . Of course if you're doing a lot of casting you'll need a lot of sand ...
Reply to
Snag
Yes, I use the 1/4" screen... And I use a concrete mixing tub to lay out my sand for evaporation of excess water.. Regular raking gets the wet stuff on top... And, yes again, it's neat how the moisure will equalize in a closed bucket.
Reply to
Chet

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