Brazing popped a hole in the concrete

This weekend I was brazing two pieces of 1/8" mild. Had them supported on the floor of my garage on an old bed frame bracket.
After a few minutes of heating (mapp $30 torch), there was a pop and pieces leaving a 3/16" deep x 1 1/2" diameter hole popped out of the garage floor. That'll teach me to play with fire. My question is how to patch the concrete so the hole will not grow from ice, salt falling from the car or from kids skateboarding over it? Suggestions on how to patch it? TIA
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how
2 part epoxy.
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John wrote:

Quickcrete and a trowel.
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You'll need to use a 2 part patching compound. Unfortunately, you'll probably have to buy a 30# bag of it, along with a gallon of the additive. Look in the Yellow pages for "concrete construction" supply houses, not ready mix plants. The product I use is called Shep-Patch, but I'm sure it's manufactured by someone else and named after the supplier, Shepler's, a regional business. But if you're close, I've got an extra bag taking up space.
-- Gary Brady Austin, TX www.powdercoatoven.4t.com

how
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You can get a two part epoxy that comes in two half pint cans. Right amount, wrong texture. Add sand. Your color will still be a little off, you didn't say how important that is to you but the 30# bag stuff may not be much closer, depending on what you're trying to match.
bob g.
Gary Brady wrote:

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On Mon, 30 Aug 2004 12:07:07 -0500, Robert Galloway

33 years ago I patched broken brick with brick dust mixed with epoxy. About 15 years ago I happened to be in the neighborhood and got to look at the patch. Still holding. I'm sure there is an epoxy based concrete patch product available. It just makes sense. ERS
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It certainly exists. I've used it. It's what I described in my post. Comes in two half pint cans. Gray color. Matches gray porch and deck paint without even touching up. Add sand if you want the texture.
rhg
Eric R Snow wrote:

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On Mon, 30 Aug 2004 13:42:17 -0500, Robert Galloway
I meant something with the concrete already added. But maybe you have to add whatever kind of filler you want. ERS

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Your color will still be a little

Agreed, the 2 part product will be much darker than the original concrete, even after it cures for a while. -- Gary Brady Austin, TX www.powdercoatoven.4t.com "
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Memories. A favorite trick when I was in high school was to take the oxyacetylene torch with cutting head attached, get a good sized flame and direct it against the concrete, reaching under the skirt of one of the arc welding booths. Sounded like pop corn or gunshots depending on one's luck that day and pelted the poor arc welder with gravel sized pieces of concrete. I've been on both ends of that one. Instructor never directed his wrath at me but he didn't see the humor in it.
bob g.
John wrote:

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On 30 Aug 2004 06:32:05 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (John) wrote:

Along with the other suggestions, Bondo/Plastic Padding will do the job quite well also.
Mark Rand RTFM
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On 30 Aug 2004 06:32:05 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (John) wrote:

Ive seen spalls like that repaired easily by drilling a .5" x 2-3" hole in the center of the spall, and pouring in PourRock until its full and then troweling it smooth. Irrc PourRock (mixes with water) comes in a 2-5 lb box for only a few dollars.
The drilled hole acts as an anchor preventing it from ever lifting or being kicked out. Dad did several of those patches that I recall, and other than being off colored (who cares about color in an unpainted concrete floor), they have held up for over 30 yrs of rough traffic.
Gunner
"She's (my daughter) already dating a sex offender. Better that than a republican fundie neocon fascist." FF, (alt.machines.cnc)
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Anything keeping one from using a rather cement-ey mix, say 1:1 or 1:2 cement and sand? Or heck, what about straight portland?
Tim
-- "I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!" - Homer Simpson Website @ http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
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Probably shrinkage, and it would never cure correctly.
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On Mon, 30 Aug 2004 21:33:57 -0700, "PrecisionMachinisT"

Manufacturers of PVA glues claim that they can be used (diluted) to prime the fractured surface. I would then use some diluted to make a stiff 1:1 sand cement mixture to patch the damage. Cutting the edges down to get away from feathering would also help. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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Really? I've got a spot on a sidewalk where I dumped some bits of cement that I thought were useless (I riddled the cement, gets real clumpy in the musty humid basement) and so far I've had no luck with random glancing blows on the area.....
I've got to imagine that, with so much cement, it doesn't really matter if it cures right... <g>
Tim
-- "I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!" - Homer Simpson Website @ http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
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blows
If the water evaporates before the portland cement fully hydrates you lose volume.
With a small patch like he was talking about here, often the parent concrete will wick the water out of the patch material even if its kept covered.
This may work okay if its covered with saran for several days--but why fuss with it.....how much does a tube of jb weld cost these days anyhow ???
I have several epoxy patches in our floor, and you would be hard pressed to find them as it went on so smooth and flush with the existing floor that its almost imperceptable.
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On Mon, 30 Aug 2004 21:33:57 -0700, "PrecisionMachinisT"

Btw...I think I errored..that should be PourStone, rather than PourRock.
Gunner
"She's (my daughter) already dating a sex offender. Better that than a republican fundie neocon fascist." FF, (alt.machines.cnc)
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On 30 Aug 2004 06:32:05 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (John) wrote:

There are a lot of good suggestions for materials, but not for preparation. You need to open the hole up a bit so it's at least 1/4" deep across the whole area for epoxies, or 1/2" deep for cement based repairs, and undercut the edges so the repair material "keys in" to the surrounding concrete and stays there.
The simplest method is a carbide drill bit and a hammer-drill. Drill down at an angle around the edges, make a ring of holes pointed outwards at a 45-degree angle. Vacuum out the garbage, then apply your epoxy or hydraulic cement patching material.
--<< Bruce >>--
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On Tue, 31 Aug 2004 06:07:57 GMT, Bruce L. Bergman

Very good , except water and an air compressor in phases would be better. Let dry big time before epoxie , do it right away with cement.
Sponges are cool , set it over the cement patch after it looks good. The floor is going to be really dry and suck moisture out of your patch ASAP. Feed the sponge with water lightly if you have to. Lots of acrylic bonder will help.
It will never match if it's rented or someone is anal. One to one is what you want with the bonder , but you have to realize the shrinkage so make it thick and keep it moist a long time before you ahhh.
Test it..
I had to fix a spa way out in west Texas once and found large fire pit mounds. Lots of black flint chardes around. I heard from someone that they (the ahhh indigenous native americans) would heat up the flint and drop water on it to get the grains right for the rough tool. Anyone know if this "wives tale" is right or where they just struck in the right way only ?
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