BUILDING SHOP: SMOOTH OR ROUGH CONCRETE?

I am building a shop with a concrete floor.
I think that smooth concrete would be best for the floor due to easy
cleaning.
I also think a rough finish would be better to keep from slipping.
Maybe a trade-off.
What is the consensus?
Thanks in advance
Reply to
knowone
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Smooth concrete with rubber floor mats where ever you'll be standing for extended times.
Reply to
Diamond Dave
I agree, but with pallets instead of mats. Pallets allow for a place for chips to go, so you don't have to stand in or on them. You can build something from scrap lumber. It need not be tall, just some 1" stuff will work fine. It's not only better for chip control, but keeps you off the hard concrete floor. That can be nice if you stand for prolonged periods, and even nicer if your floor is cold and you don't like cold feet.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
I went with a steel-trowelled (smooth) finish, caulked the control joints, and then painted with flat white floor paint (no traction additives needed, the paint itself is not slippery; and it's cheap & easy to recoat). Rolling things on a rough surface gets old, fast, as does sweeping. I've had no trouble with slipping so far.
Insulate under and put radiant heat tubing in the slab, even if you presently don't think you'll want to heat the slab - it's cheap and easy at this point, expensive and a hassle to retrofit later. If it looks expensive now, find a different supplier.
Use plenty of re-bar, bend corner pieces, and put extra in around the doors.
Reply to
Ecnerwal
Will you be running coolant on any of the machines in the shop?
Water based coolant on a painted concrete floor is slippery as hell, that would be one case where a broom finish would be better.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
I believe Harold is correct on the wooden risers to stand on. I previously used rubber or some type of neoprene mats, the problem I had is swarf sticking into the mat. When I switched to a harder rubber mat, it just wasn't comfortable. I made my riser out of 2 X 2 and it works fine, very comfortable even after 6 or 7 hours.
Reply to
Rastus
Absolutely, make it as smooth troweled as possible. A grain of sand will cause a heavily laden metal wheeled dolly to stop or hesitate, so a rough floor definitely will. Also, you'll never seem to get a rough floor really clean. Slipping has never been an issue with me.
Reply to
Gary Brady
Be aware that there are non slip additives to paints and finishes. You can have a smooth even floor that, with the non slip finish, would be not too slippery.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus361
Steel trowled, preferably with a machine to get the densest top surface. Top coat with epoxy to control the oil stains.
know> I am building a shop with a concrete floor.
Reply to
RoyJ
Absolutely, a hard trowel (smooth) finish. Heat tubes in the floor is a great idea. Radiant heat in the floor is the most comfortable. Have your contractor use a shake-on colored hardener when he pours the floor. My choice would be white. You'll never have to paint the floor, because the color is in the concrete. This isn't colored concrete. its added to the top of the 'crete after striking off and before floating. it goes about 1/4" deep. If your contractor doesn't know what it is or how to use it, find one that does. Tom 30 years in construction.
Reply to
Tom Wait
Power troweled as smooth as possible and with no slope. It's a hell of a lot easier to level machines on an already level surface.
Radiant floor heat is something I didn't do and kick m'self every day for not doing. My contractor also said I didn't need a vapor barrier or insulation under th' pour since th' ground drains so well... wish I wouldn't have listened to that either.
Snarl
Reply to
snarl
And DO NOT let them put in chloride to accelerate the curing process. Your floor will crack. If they don't want to take the time to do it right, find someone else. I told my contractor not to. He still did it. Ticked me off, but there wasnt' much I could do about it that point, once it's poured you're stuck with it.
We worked it out, but he wont' ever do work for me again.
JW
C.W. Thomas wrote:
Reply to
jw
I reccomend smooth
Let it cure for 30 days then seal or paint it.
Makes it a lot easier to clean and less dusty.
C
Reply to
C.W. Thomas
The next time I get a floor done I'm going to hire an artist to paint little pictures of nuts, bolts and screws all over the floor.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
Many of the shops I service..use wooden "matts", which are no more than 3/4" wood frames with a layer of wooden lath stapled across the frame, spaced about 1-1.5" apart. Has some spring to it..allows you to find the bits you dropped and is simple to pick up and sweep under. Size tends to be about 24" x 48" long.
Pulling up the interlocking plastic square matts is a pain in the ass as they tend to come apart while doing it, and they can get hard with years of oil spillage on them.
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Never been in an Acme Gridley shop I take it?
They really really require special soles on your boots.
Leather soles..instant Icecapades.....
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Yeah, that shop I worked at during nights a while ago was like that.
They had a Kasto cutoff saw running full time, and the thing used water-based coolant. The floor were like a sheet of ice.
There were a couple of times when guys would go to start pulling a bin of parts on a pump jack, and their feet would just go out from under them. Pretty dangerous really.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
What a great group. I hadn't considered pallets or even heated pipe or colored/top colored concrete.
Well, he is going to pour this week or rather pump so not sure if I can do all of this or not. Can one use PVC for warm - not hot- water for heating the floor?
He has the slab divided into quarters due to the center beams that will go in.
I definitely will do the smooth finish, I am not sure that I can do the heated floor and besides, what do you heat it with or, how do you heat the water?
How much does the colorant cost and where does one get it?
I had planned to use rubber mats but now, after reading the suggestions, I will build pallets - great idea.
Not planning on using coolant.
Thanks everyone.
Reply to
knowone
Probably not a good idea - PEX (crosslinked polyethlyene) is made for the job, and pretty commonly available.
Depending one the heat load, a hot water heater, or a hot water furnace. Some contribution from solar panels is also a possibility.
Reply to
Ecnerwal
Nope. Do a google search on radiant floor heating, there's a ton of info available. You may want to seriously consider rescheduling your pour to accommodate this. I sure as hell wish I would have!
Usually natural gas or propane, but it can also be done electrically. Make a few phone calls to contractors in your area who specialize in this. Your concrete contractor should know some as well.
From what I understand, running th' pipe correctly is pretty easy for a DIY project. Depending on heat source and number of zones, you might want to have that part done by a professional.
Snarl
Reply to
snarl

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