BUILDING SHOP: SMOOTH OR ROUGH CONCRETE?

Nah, just get real ones, and embed them in the epoxy coating instead of sand... --Glenn Lyford
Reply to
glyford
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Make damn certain that the mix is as strong and low water as can be pumped. I got a mix (in my second load) that had too much sand and too much water. This has lead to some of the floor being decidedly soft. I am going to have to use a hardener on it to get the finish I need. My slab is 8" concrete on top of 4" EPS foam. I power floated it to get it as level as I could and will grind the bits that aren't quite right with a diamond cup wheel to get the "perfect" finish. I am planning to use an epoxy floor paint to finish it.
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In my Garage (pre-workshop) I built duck-boards using 2x4s and decking boards to en able my 10 year old son to reach the lathe. These were very comfortable to stand on. of course, he doesn't need them now, since he is now 13 and taller than me :-(
Good luck with the project and keep us posted
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
My Aunt (now deceased) and her daughter, my Cousin, are both artists and work with many materials. In her house is a beautiful kitchen and dining room. Big restaraunt stove and ovens. They painted the floor as if it was the surface of a pond. It has many layers of clear coat. It is so realistic that you feel as if you are walking on water. It makes you think you will sink into it. There are fish, plants, frogs, etc. in the water. I wish I had that floor. ERS
Reply to
Eric R Snow
There is a way of troweling that produces a very hard and smooth finish. This prevents the floor from dusting and is much easier to sweep/clean. No paint required. I have heard it called a "burned" finish and I think a hardening chemical is used during the troweling. A neighbor had his done like this and it's far superior to my own smooth, but not "burned", floor. Bob
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
On Mon, 05 Dec 2005 15:53:56 -0800, with neither quill nor qualm, Eric R Snow quickly quoth:
I saw a picture of a tromp l'oel bathroom floor last year where the setting was you in mid air with nothing but air and clouds below you. It was so realistic that I'd be willing to bet it was covered in either vomit or fainted people half the time. (I've just had no luck finding a copy on my computer.)
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Reply to
Larry Jaques
Nah, just get the epoxy floor coating with the color flakes that you sprinkle on top while the top coat is still wet.
The tan epoxy with slightly darker tan sprinkles doesn't appear to be too bad at camouflage. But if you use the light gray epoxy with the flakes being black and three shades of gray, I can assure you it'll be just as effective and a lot cheaper than custom painting those scattered bolts and nuts on the floor.
(Stick with the solid color epoxy for floors that will be worked over. I saw a garage done in gray/black today, and that was the first thought that popped into my head - "What were they thinking?" It looks great, till the first time you drop something. Then you're going to go bonkers.)
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
You mean this one? (watch out for line wrap)
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technomaNge
Reply to
technomaNge
On Mon, 05 Dec 2005 23:16:41 -0600, with neither quill nor qualm, technomaNge quickly quoth:
YES, that's it! Isn't that a -great- floor?
P.S: I meant "trompe l'oeil" there, too.
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Reply to
Larry Jaques
PEX is pretty cheap and can be gotten at nearly any major hardware store now. 1/2" should run you about $.20/ft. For a shop you can go pretty wide at about 15" centers on the loops. Figure ~ 1' for 1sq ft and you will come out pretty close.
If you have big doors(garage doors, etc) or areas where you know you will have higher heat loss, put a higher concentration(8-10") there and if possible try to make them the hot end of the loop.
Each circuit should be no more than 250' for a practical limit. 300' is a max without having to go to a high pressure pump. If you need multiple loops, try to keep them similar lengths. It will avoid having to add balancing valves and other stuff.
Do a google on radiant heat and design and you will find plenty of good info.
I have a 80gal water heater that I rewired to use both elements simultaneously. My electric bill goes up about $50 in the winter. This is Minnesota winter, so it's a pretty good load. An electric boiler would be smaller. Debatably more efficient.
FYI: Figure it will take 2 days to do everything. One day to prep the base and lay down all of the foam and make sure it's all correct. 1 day to layout the lines. Depends on the crew, but it's not hard to do just time consuming. If you have a drawn out plan and make marks on the foam and then have someone put in clips it's easy to follow back again with the PEX line.
It's up to you, but for $2-300 to have the easy option to add heated floor, would be worth it to me. Heated floor is REALLY nice, and you are going to have to add some sort of heat eventually.
Reply to
jw
I vote for smooth. But nobody has mentioned strength yet. My concrete always used to crack until I went to 4000-4500 psi concrete and 6 ionch thick floors with fiberglass. Many contractors don't seem to want to even discuss higher strength concrete- I think they are afraid that since it costs more, you will go find someone else.
My latest shop has all of the above. The concrete is sitting on top of 2 inches of high density foam and had 2" foam 2 feet deep imbedded all the way around the edges.
Pete Stanaitis -----------------
Ecnerwal wrote:
Reply to
spaco
LOL. This reminds me of when I had a large pole barn built. I had 3 bays 14X16. I told the cement contractor to leave the fourth bay with just a gravel floor, as I wanted to park my Cat D-8 in there. He told me I wouldn't have any problem parking it on 6 inch reinforced concrete. He said if I cracked it he would replace that section at his expense. You can guess what happened when I pulled the D-8 in there. I didn't force him to replace the concrete, I just had him bust it out of there and replace with gravel like I wanted in the first place.
Reply to
Rastus
6" - for a D8?. Wow. I wouldn't have made the claim that guy did. I would think given enough time to cure and a really solid base, you "might" be ok. I wouldn't guarantee that it woudn't. 8" would be the minimum. You can get some pretty good point loads on a steel tracked crawler.
I agree with the glass thing though. Even if you do add glass, I would still recommend, at the minimum, wire and for good insurance rebar. Rebar is cheap. A ton is $80, at least around here. A ton of 1/2 rebar will go a long way.
JW
Reply to
jw
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Wow, JW, have you checked prices lately? They're paying more than that for steel scrap. The Chinese have driven the markets out of sight.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
Google 'concrete dry shake color' There's a bunch of info on the web. Your contractor should be able to get it for you. It is dusted on before the floating operation. Good luck, Tom
Reply to
Tom Wait
Thanks. I did Google it and I would need over 1200 pounds of the stuff.
The contractor is pumping Thursday so it is too late for that and the heating pipe.
I appreciate everyone's help.
Reply to
knowone
I used to visit a PCB fab shop. This was in the 70's. The entire shop was built up on pallets - so the runoff wouldn't flow on their shoes. I think the floor was dipped to the center with a large drain...
Hose down to flush whatever down. The ugly days before OSHA cleaned up those shops. (one of the good things they did) Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH, NRA Life NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder
Harold and Susan Vordos wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
That's what I paid for it about 2 months ago.
Just set a pad for a new(to me) grain bin.
Our scrap steel/iron used to be around $150/ton. Now it's down to about $60.
Concrete(for reference) was only $74/yd. I was surprised by that. I thought for sure it would have been closer to $100. That was for "standard" 3000psi 6" slump.
JW
Reply to
jw
I'm not really up to speed on prices, but this link appears to value scrap steel higher, although there are some varieties that go for even lower prices.
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Regards concrete, I think it's regional. I was pleasantly surprised to find that I could purchase concrete for building our shop and house for prices that were comparable to those I paid in the early 80's when I lived elsewhere. We're paying about $70 for six sack mix.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos

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