Buying material for metal turning

Hello all,
I'm planning to buy a small lathe so I can make small parts for projects I have. I have had no problems in finding places to sell the
tools needed, but I've no idea where to get the material to work with.
Also, what is the best material people would recommend to work with?
Thanks
--Amr
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What are you trying to make? Does it need to be hard? Light? Strong? Weather resistant? Cheap? Pretty?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Metal Express, they will cutoff the sizes you want, for a price. Local steel dealers, as long as you want 16' They have cutoff-bins. Auctions, ebay.
I get *most* of my supplies from a recycling place as I use a lot of Aluminum/Brass/Bronze, these I pay by the lb. for fractions of retail. It's catch as catch-can. I've not been there since the latest feeding frenzy on copper.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27 Nov 2006 11:26:40 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Personally, I prefer rigatoni for most of my turning needs, though natural sponge rubber runs a close second..but only if harvested below the equator.
Ah...what are you making? Animal, vegitable or mineral?
Gunner
Political Correctness
A doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical liberal minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can start with general dealers like Enco. Type raw material in their search and you will find options for aluminum, brass, etc http://www.use-enco.com/
Another source is McMaster http://www.mcmaster.com/ and type in brass, aluminum, stainless, cast iron, etc. in their search.
These places also sell plastics like UHMW, delrin, PVC.
Have fun!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for the replies everyone!
I will check out the dealers you people have mentioned. I also found that RS sell material as well.
The first thing I want to turn are a set of puleys to transfer power from a windscreen wiper motor to a shaft on a remote control vehicle I hope to make, so I don't think it's going to be something that's going to be under any immense stresses. This is the kind of thing I plan to be making.
I notice that brass seems to be quite a common turning material, but it looks like it's mostly used for making models. Am I right? In the past I've used bright bar (which I think is mild steel) to make a toolmakers clamp as part of my uni course. Which would be more suitable for my task?
I'm sure there's loads of materials out there, and I was wondering which are the most commonly used by metal workers?
Thanks
--Amr
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Look at a similar off-the-shelf item . You'll likely end up turning everything from 6061 aluminum to 4140 air hardening steel - depending on what you make . Another poster suggested as big a lathe as you can afford/have room for . I heartily second that opinion , bigger is more rigid , and more rigid is a good thing . I use my 10 X30 Logan/PowrKraft mostly for motorcycle stuff , and have turned a wide range of materials - from Polyethlene washers to 4140 steel bushings for a springer front end . Since this is a material thread , I need some advice . I want to turn a set of motorcycle footpegs , stainless abt 1" diameter . They'll be grooved with a .125" parting tool about .100 deep X .125 spacing . The mounting end will be milled square to fit an existing mount . I've been making axle caps and some pegs from 304 and 306 (I think) , neither of which has been easy to work with , particularly threading holes . Suggestions for an easier to machine SS for this application ?
--

Snag aka OSG #1
'76 FLH "Bag Lady"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
    [ ... ]

    416 SS -- but it is not *as* stainless. And that grooving sounds like a tough task for a lathe as small as yours. Stainless tends to work-harden rather quickly -- especially if you pause in your cut.
    Good Luck,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DoN. Nichols wrote:

Thanks , Don . I've got a short of 316 I can test on . Biggest problem I have with the grooving is chatter , you're correct that I'm pushing the limits of this machine . Gotta match the highway pegs I made for a friend's wife's bike . I've got til her birthday in April ...
--

Snag aka OSG #1
'76 FLH "Bag Lady"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Snag wrote:

OOps , my mistake , I'll have to find some 416 for testing . Surprising how the eyes/mind see what we expect to see ...
--

Snag aka OSG #1
'76 FLH "Bag Lady"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

303 of course.
Gunner
Political Correctness
A doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical liberal minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gunner wrote:

Thanks ! I'll have to get some 303 and try it , see how it works . I'm sure havin' fun with this little machine , making little doodads for my bike and those of friends .
--

Snag aka OSG #1
'76 FLH "Bag Lady"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Too bad your not in my area. Ive got probably 500 lbs of it in various drops up to 4" in diameter.
As another poster said..416 might be good too, but the machinibility index of 303 for this application is damned good and its common as hell. Its not for marine invironments..it will corrode more than 416...but I doubt you will be riding in the ocean or on a lot of salted ice <G> You cant heat treat it..but for foot pegs..1" diameter..Id not bother. It does weld, though its not as good as others for welding. Welding 416 is not recommended..though it does heat treat to some degree. I use a LOT of 303 for most small projects like this. And I weld it up a lot.
But.its common as hell, and you can talk most shops out of drops for little or nothing.
Gunner
Political Correctness
A doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical liberal minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Try this site for small quantities of material http://www.mcmaster.com/ Use the search window at their site and type in 303 stainless steel.
If you need any production CNC Machining done for any of you home inventions try this site :-)
http://www.Smart-mfg.com
Derek Smart
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I told him that a few weeks ago in another ng <shrug>.
How's that go... 304, she's a whore 303, she's for me
Snarl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@trippin.net wrote:

Ain't it great to have your opinion validated ? That was for the axle caps , which are finished . I used what I had on hand ... which was most of the rest of the piece of 304 . Did I tell ya I broke two carbon steel 5/16-18 taps and ruined my best TiN one ? Gonna be a-headin' for the supplier friday for some 303 and some 416 . Try 'em both and see which works best for my application . Care fer a frosty cold Coors ?
--

Snag aka OSG #1
'76 FLH "Bag Lady"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Btw...isnt 1.00 foot pegs a bit small in diameter? Last set I made up for the XL350 were 1.5 and even they seemed a bit thin under the off road riding boots
Gunner
Rule #35 "That which does not kill you, has made a huge tactical error"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gunner wrote:

Yeah , but Lynn has small feet ... I haven't measured , but you're right , 1" does seem to be a bit small . What do I know , mine has footboards . She has aftermarket forward controls , and they're different . I'll make sure before I start turning , I hate to do things over . BTW , the rule above is one of my favorites .
--

Snag aka OSG #1
'76 FLH "Bag Lady"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:
<snip>
I mumbled:

Happens to me all th' time <g>.

Some guys'll do anything to stay out in their shop a little longer...

Let us know, although I'm pretty sure what th' results will be.

Hell yeah, see ya across th' street.
Snarl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

^^^^^^

^^^

    O.K. The two indicated words suggest to me that you are posting from the UK, which means that you will be experiencing different terms for the same materials. (And you have been getting suggestions assuming that you are in the USA so far.)
    For example "bright bar" I think is what is usually called BMS (Bright Mild Steel) in the UK, and "cold rolled steel" here in the USA.
    Personally -- if you did not need particular strength for a given project, I would choose (from weakest and easiest to turn to strongest among the easy metals), and using US terms:
1)    Alumin(i)um:    6061-T6
2)    Brass:     360 free machining (leaded) brass
3)    Steel:     12L14 free machining leaded mild steel, (Leadaloy)             a particularly nice steel to machine.
    One thing to bear in mind with steels are that the hot-rolled is covered with scale, but is unlikely to distort from the machining, while the cold-rolled has stresses incorporated in the metal, and it is likely to distort as you remove one surface (more of a problem with milling than with turning). Hot rolled is supplied a bit more oversized, to make it clean up to the proper size instead of undersized.
    And if a good plastic will do for your task, get Delrin (Acetal), which machines nicely, and is tough (as plastics go). There are other good plastics, depending on your needs. Some swell a bit when wet, so be careful there.

    The above four are what I am most likely to work with, unless I need greater strength or hardenability (and am willing to trade off the fact that they will be more difficult to machine). For greater strength, and good hardenability, I like 4140 steel (again a US designation which you will need to translate). But, I have a good 12" Clausing lathe which is a bit more rigid and more powerful than the typical home shop lathe.
    I would suggest that you get tied into the model engineering world in the UK, where you can get the local names for the materials, and a list of local suppliers. It does *not* make sense for you to be ordering steel (in home shop quantities) across the Atlantic. :-)
    Good Luck,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.