CO2 adapter?

I like soda in my Scotch but I am getting tired of paying $6 for 10 seltzer
bottle chargers. I have an 80 CF CO2 cylinder and a regulator but need an
adapter for the Seltzer bottle. Seltzer bottles have a females .860 major
diameter 14 TPI Whitworth (55º) thread. It appears to be a BSB 341 No. 8 or
DIN 477 No.6 adapter but I can't find one anywhere. I suppose I could turn
one but that is a lot of work for a small part.
Any suggestions? I am not particular about the size of the other side of
the adapter.
Reply to
Glenn Ashmore
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"Glenn Ashmore" wrote: (clip) I have an 80 CF CO2 cylinder and a regulator but need an adapter for the Seltzer bottle. (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Why don't you drill a hole in the side of one of your used cartridges, and weld on a piece of tubing of your choice?
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Easier than you think. See my page:
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Reply to
Richard J Kinch
How about a tablespoon of vinegar and a bit of baking soda?
Reply to
Tom Gardner
I fitted an auto parts bolt-on Schrader valve (tire valve) to a 2-liter soda bottle cap. I fill the soda bottle about 1/4 full of water and lay it on its side in the freezer, and when it's frozen I tap it against the bench and break the ice. Then I fill it mostly with filtered water and then flow in CO2 through the tire valve, shaking to dissolve the gas. You can also add flavorings and make pop that way, but soda water is dead easy. It won't go flat after opening either because you can give it a recharge shot of CO2 through the bottle top. All you need to do to your CO2 tank is plumb a tire valve fitting to it, piece of cake. Richard Kinch's site is very helpful. Cuts the price of soda water to nearly free.
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
"Tom Gardner" wrote
Makes the Scotch taste funny. :-)
Think I may take Leo's suggestion but drill through the end of the cartridge and the holder for a tube.
Reply to
Glenn Ashmore
Do you have any idea how much pressure you're adding? How do you know when you've put in enough?
Reply to
Dave Lyon
The colder the water the more CO2 it will dissolve. I can hear the gas flowing into the bottle. I stop when the gas flow slows noticeably, in other words when the water has dissolved about as much as it is going to. It's plenty fizzy, but no I don't have any numbers. I did this with my kids for nearly a year, works absolutely perfectly.
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Well that was a perfect project for a long lunch hour! The victim was an old ISI soda siphon. I took an empty CO2 cartridge and drilled the back end to 1/4". Inserted a piece of copper tube and brazed it in place. Then I drilled a hole in the end of the recharging cap and fit the cartridge/tube in it. Put a flare fitting on the other end to fit an old NO2 gauge and changed out the gauge's tank fitting for CO2. (It pays to have a good junk collection.)
Filled the siphon with cold water from the refrigerator dispenser and plugged everything up. Ran the regulator up to 100psi and nothing happened! Disassembled the siphon and used an air gun to see if it was plugged. It appears that the valve in the charging port will not open below about 125PSI. SO I put it all back together and ran the regulator up to 250PSI and it bubbled nicely. After about 5 minutes the bubbles stopped and Bingo! Soda water!
The CO2 cylinder is an industrial K size and still has about 50 pounds of gas so at 8 grams per charge I should be able to make enough seltzer for about 1400 liters of Scotch. :-)
Reply to
Glenn Ashmore
Thanks, I was asking because I don't have a regulator on my CO2 tank. Those little 20 oz bottles can hold an amazing amount of pressure, but I wouldn't want to put in too much. :)
Reply to
Dave Lyon
I've had some scotch that it would improve!
Reply to
Tom Gardner
I'm supprised at the pressure you needed! The CO2 system for beer is about 5-8lb. pressure which is a lot less than the 125lb. thqt you had to go past. Then again, I guess that the soda syphons do squirt a lot further than a beer tap does. I'll note for all that the typical pressure in a CO2 bottle is about 1000lb at normal room temp. From memory, I kind of remember that CO2 liquefies at atmosphereic pressure at somewhere around -280 degrees F.
-- Why do penguins walk so far to get to their nesting grounds?
Reply to
Bob May
Well I may have set the pressure a little high. This was the first Scotch & soda I ever had with a head on it. :-)
Reply to
Glenn Ashmore
Greetings Glenn, Your name almost sounds like a name for scotch. "Bartender, two shots of that 24 year old Glenn Ashmore please. MMMM." ERS
Reply to
Eric R Snow
"Eric R Snow" wrote> Greetings Glenn,
Well my ancestors were from the right area and from what I my grandma said were distillers but once they got to this side of the pond they discovered corn was cheaper than barley and changed the recipe. The problem, from what I gather, was that they didn't worry to much about paying the taxes. :-)
Reply to
Glenn Ashmore
CO2 system for beer at 5-8 PSI is not carbonating the beer, it is only pushing the beer through the line to the tap. Homebrew folks force carbonating beer run the CO2 a good deal higher during carbonation and then return to the low pressure for dispensing.
Pete C.
Reply to
Pete C.
For {$deity} sake, go get a regulator!! Put too much pressure in a PETE soda bottle, and you can make a bomb out of it. If nothing else, the threads on the cap will give, and I think you've heard the one that starts "For every action there is an equal and opposite..."
I used around 25 to 30 PSI in a soda bottle for carbonation of water, or refreshing an open bottle of cola, works like a dream.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
On Wed, 12 Jul 2006 20:55:11 GMT in rec.crafts.metalworking, "Dave Lyon" wrote,
I wouldn't want to do it without a regulator. I found 40 PSI to be plenty for soft drinks. Maybe a bit more for soda that's going to be mixed with something..
Reply to
David Harmon
Please videotape your experiments for sharing, Dave. The fun part will be where Dave gets instantly quite wet with a bang. Carbonating grape juice could be particularly visual....
PET bottles blow somewhere around 150 PSI, though the cap may blow off before that. Don't let the cap hit you in the forehead. If that happens north of 100 PSI, it'll probably leave a dent in your forehead. I can tell you for sure that it'll leave a dent in a sheetrock ceiling at 65 PSI.
30 to 50 PSI in the bottle is plenty for carbonation.
BTW, you can also oxygenate cold water. Minnows don't seem to tolerate that well, but leeches do. Result: combat ninja live bait, "BRING IT ON, WALLEYE, EYAHHHH!"
Reply to
Don Foreman
Oxygenated Leeches? Shit Don..they'd be tossing the wallys into the boat themselves.
Gunner
"The importance of morality is that people behave themselves even if nobody's watching. There are not enough cops and laws to replace personal morality as a means to produce a civilized society. Indeed, the police and criminal justice system are the last desperate line of defense for a civilized society. Unfortunately, too many of us see police, laws and the criminal justice system as society's first line of defense." --Walter Williams
Reply to
Gunner

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