Consumer electronics "war stories"

On Sun, 06 Dec 2015 16:43:08 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:


My copy of that, after many years pumping water to the garden, went to a nephew to power his go-cart!
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Gerry :-)}
London,Canada
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On 06 Dec 2015 16:01:54 -0400, Mike Spencer

These gas powered washers usually came with a flexible length of exhaust tubing which my Grandpa often threatened to instal on Grandma!
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Gerry :-)}
London,Canada
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Leon Fisk wrote:

A friend of mine has a log cabin in the Missouri Ozarks. He has a Frigidaire (I think) washer that must have been made in 1946 or something. Seems a little too modern to have been made before most industries shut down during the great depression, so I'm taking a wild guess. You fill it with a water hose, drain it by putting the drain hose on the ground, and it has a wringer. He says it still works, but I have not actually seen him fire it up. Looks like a fair bit of trouble to use, and that wringer looks seriously dangerous.
Jon
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wrote:

Oh, they are, but they're also a whole lot more effective than the spin cycles on the majority of new washers. The downside is that they press in creases in some materials. BTDT, got the wrinkles and pinched fingers. I do _not_ miss working at the car wash where that beastie was housed.
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wrote:

Reminds me of my brother's comment of 50+ years ago regarding the sound of rubber pants going through the wringer. The Connor circa 1949 came with an optional small tub that functioned very well as a butter churn after it was restrained by a double hook formed from the rear brake actuater rod from a Model "A" Ford.
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Gerry :-)}
London,Canada
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wrote:

Praps y'all should pursue these 2 less technical devices? http://tinyurl.com/ngmuzox and http://tinyurl.com/q57xduk
They sure beat rocks. (Well, a bit.)
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On Sun, 06 Dec 2015 11:51:17 -0800, Larry Jaques

I have a concrete laundry tub like that in my house (two sinks instead of three) and one side has a built-in washboard made of sheet zinc. The house was built in 1924 and the sink probably was installed at the time.
I always liked the solution that John Steinbeck described in _Travels with Charlie_. He had a custom-made pickup camper that he drove across the country. In the shower stall he suspended a small plastic garbage can on bungee cords. He'd fill it with clothes, soap and water. He said clothes were clean in about 50 miles of driving.
--
Ed Huntress


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Larry Jaques wrote:

Well, but it really works well, gets clothes clean on about 10 gallons of water per load. It also spins the clothes so dry (at 1200 RPM) that you could almost wear them without using the dryer. We actually were able to see the drop in our water bill when we got the thing.
I did have to replace the main bearings and seals on it, and waited too long, so detergenty water got into the motor and burned up some windings. Fortunately, it didn't fry the VFD.
Then, last month I had to extract a US Quarter (coin) out of the drain pump.
Otherwise, it just works, and has done many thousands of wash loads. Some of the kids have moved out, but when we got it we had a family of eight, so the washer was busy from 9 AM to 9 PM most nights.
Jon
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wrote:

I'd love to have a real spin dry cycle like that. <sigh>

Oops.

Durned sneaky Murricans getting into the pipes, eh?

EIGHT? Wow.
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On Sun, 06 Dec 2015 11:51:17 -0800, Larry Jaques

Re the laundry tubs; have you ever taken a bath in a concrete bath tub? In 1946 my maternal grandfather came to live with us, he missed his big city bathtub and disliked the Saturday night ritual in the round, galvanized laundry tub so he built forms and cast his own concrete bath tub -full size with three inch walls - took eight men to move one. Idon't know if there are any left - he cast about a dozen for neighbours - our developed a crack when it was moved from behind the kitchen stove into the new fangled indoor bathroom in 1960 and was replaced with a more modern unit. That tub taught me to appreciate the rubber bath mat!
--

Gerry :-)}
London,Canada
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On Mon, 07 Dec 2015 19:33:00 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

Thankfully, NO!

I can imagine.
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wrote:

We've got one of those damned things. Be sure and use the "washing machine cleaner" every month or so, and use the extra rinse button. Otherwise, soap scum builds up around the shaft seal, it fails, then the drum bearing fails, and the cheap (NOT) fix is haul it to the shop and have them replace the damned drum plus bearing assembly. It ain't cheap.
My brother fixed his own, after the repairman he called said he should just replace the whole thing. Didn't even know (or want to admit) how to run the diagnostics. Chuck figured that out after he ran the guy off, and repaired accordingly.
Wife likes it, I hate the damned thing.
Pete Keillor
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Pete Keillor wrote:

Yeah, I KNEW the seals were going and the bearings were shot, but I just DIDN'T want to tear into the thing. Fear of the unknown.
Now that I've done it once, I know it really isn't that big of a deal, and I made up the pieces for the extractor/installer tool that they want to rent you for $100 a day. It takes a couple hours and costs about $70 for the kit. So, the next time it starts sounding like a 747 taking off when doing the spin cycle, i will NOT delay ordering the rebuild kit.
Jon
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wrote:

Greetings Jon, I am almost 100% sure that the motor is not shaded pole. A shaded pole motor starts because of the shorted winding "shading" a pole. This shorted winding is that heavy gauge copper loop around the laminations. They are not very effiecient and draw almost the same current when loaded or unloaded. Your motor sounds like a brushless DC motor. Eric
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On Mon, 07 Dec 2015 11:08:26 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

Or possibly a split phase? If variable speed, today, almost certainly BDC.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The spin/agitate motor is direct drive, 3-phase brushless motor, with a rotor position sensor. It is made in the inside-out configuration, and about 9" diameter.
The two pump motors are built very much like the old phonograph motors, but appear to have a permanent magnet in the rotor. They have ONLY one winding. No capacitors, and as far as I know, the pumps are not variable speed.
Jon
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snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:
(we're talking about the pump motors here.)

Well, it COULD be. But, it ONLY has one winding! Two wires plus safety ground. And, it seems to have (really strong) magnets in the rotor. I can't figure out how you can get a synchronous motor to run the right direction with only one winding. It REALLY looks like one of those old phonograph motors, just bigger.
Jon
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wrote:

I thought you were talking about the main motor. Shaded pole motors could be used for pump motors. They often are because they run just as hot when stalled as when running so if one is stalled they usually won't overheat. Though there applications where a fan is connected to the motor shaft to cool the motor and they will overheat up if stalled too long, usually a couple minutes at least. Still, with a magnetic rotor I don't understand how it would work as a shaded pole. I'm mystified and am going to try to find out just how your motors work. Though shaded pole motors have the advantage of speed control by changing the voltage, starting in the preferred direction, and resistance to overheating when stalled they still waste a lot of the power consumed as heat. And this would seem to keep them from being used in modern appliances. Do these motors have the shorted winding? A heavy, like 10 gauge maybe, bare copper loop near one of the corners of the lamination stack, opposite the coil? If so then they are indeed shaded pole motors. If there is no shorted winding then I would say they are not. Eric
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snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

Well, I don't remember! I had them out a couple months ago to get a quarter out of the drain pump, and I kind of thought it had the pole shade winding, but now I can't be sure. But, the pumps need to spin in the right direction, and with only one winding, I can't imagine how it could start for sure in the right direction wothout a shaded pole. Well, Likely I'll be back into the thing for some issue or other in a while, and I'll take a better look at them.
Jon
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