Consumer electronics "war stories"

Larry Jaques wrote:


No, no no! This thing is a computer video game with a washing machine grafted on the side for grins!
OK, yes, there is cold and hot water main inlet. Then, the incoming water can go straight into the tub, or it can be diverted into the softener tank, the detergent tank or the bleach tank, to deliver some of that product into the tub. Then, when the recirculate pump is on, it has valves to select where that water goes. It has two pumps (recirculate and drain) and a VFD to run the drum motor. There is a spline coupling between the motor and the basket. When the tub is filled to a certain level, an air chamber floats the basket up to disconnect the spin coupling, and then the motor is rocked back and forth for the agitate function. When draining, the basket lands on the coupling, and then the motor tweaks back and forth gently until the basket seats the coupling onto the shaft before starting the spin cycle, so as not to tear up the coupling.
The pump motors look kind of like giant photograph motors, so apparently they are 120 V shaded pole motors, but have magnets in the rotor. The recirculate motor starts smoothly, but the larger drain motor rattles and vibrates for a while until the rotor falls into sync. Quite a strange way to do things. So, I think two of the big relays are for the pump motors. Another big relay must be for the heater, but I think our actual machine does NOT have a heater installed in the tub.
I was able to download the service manual for the thing, by pressing certain buttons, you can activate multiple diagnostic and test procedures that exercise and partially self-test verious parts of the machine.
Sheesh, what a bunch of complexity, to do what used to be done with some smooth rocks down at the riverside!
Jon
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wrote:

Does it have a speaker? "I'm sorry, Dave, but I'm afraid I won't wash that..."
--
Ed Huntress

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Ed Huntress wrote:

It does have a piezo beeper that responds to button presses, beeps multiple times for "sorry, you can't press that button in this mode" and signals wash done.
Jon
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On Sun, 06 Dec 2015 12:27:54 -0600
<snip>

Still using the old Speed Queen Wringer Washer the parents bought in the late 60's...
I have two spigots with a Y-hose to fill it. Put clothes in the washer, add some detergent to your liking. Turn on the hot water, add some cold and use your hand to feel if it is the temp you want or not. When the level gets to within 2-3 inches of the top you turn the hose over to the two rinse tubs to fill. Turn the machine on, set the cover over the top and set a separate manual timer for 8-10 minutes. While it is washing keep you eye on filling the rinse tubs to within 4-5 inches of the top. When full shut the spigots off.
When the timer goes off, shut the agitator off, take the lid off and start running clothes through the ringer into the first rinse tub. When you have all the clothes in the first rinse tub, add another load to the washer. Set the timer, turn on the agitator. While the next load is washing continue sloshing clothes around in the first rinse tub and then run them through the ringer into the second rinse tub. Slosh clothes around again in the second tub and then run through ringer again.
For the last time I usually run them three times through the wringer. By this time the timer has usually went off and you wring the next load of clothes into the first rinse tub...
Now you can put the wrung clothes in the dryer or hang them outside weather permitting.
Drop the hose down from the side of the washer and run the wash water into the sump drain. Do the same with both the rinse tubs. Take the agitator out of the washer and swab out the tank, wipe down the agitator and wringer. Swab out the rinse tubs. Let them sit awhile to finish drying and then cover back up, push aside to where you keep them and wait till the next wash day.
Takes about 40 gallons of water and 1/2 cup of detergent to do my whole wash for two weeks and no relays to go bad ;-)
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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wrote:

A Steampunk washing machine! But you need a "Casey Jones Engineer" certificate to run it. d8-)
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Ed Huntress

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There were wringer washers that ran on small gasoline engines. In the 70s, an old guy near me said he remembered (gesturing toward the road he lived on) when they came up along there installing power poles, hooking up houses, in the 1930s. Right behind them came a salesman selling electric wringer washers.
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada

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On 06 Dec 2015 16:01:54 -0400, Mike Spencer

Yeah, we had the gasoline-engined washers here, too. I remember seeing some as a kid, in south New Jersey.
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Ed Huntress

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On Sun, 06 Dec 2015 15:46:17 -0500, Ed Huntress

I've got the engine..
See: http://snyder.on.ca/pages/Old%20Engines/iron_horse_501_engine.htm
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On Sun, 06 Dec 2015 16:43:08 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Very cool. Johnson Outboards made a motor for washing machines in the 1930s. And, if you have a copy of the 1952 edition of _The Boy Mechanic_ (I do), they have a plan for a flat-bottomed "sea sled" boat powered by one. It used a piece of rubber garden hose for a coupler to the prop shaft.
--
Ed Huntress

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On Sun, 06 Dec 2015 18:29:20 -0500, Ed Huntress

OMC was Johnson. (also Evinrude) and this engine was sold under all 3 names at one point. I've seen the plans. Saw one built with a twin cyl 2 stroke Maytag years ago. There wereplans to build a midget car and a scooter using the iron horse too - as well as plans for and a commercially built Maytag Midget.
The "horse" was also used on quite a few early lawn mowers and some generators and garden tractors.
They also built 2 stroke iron horse engines (used on early Lawn Boy and Jacobsen mowers)
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On Sun, 06 Dec 2015 19:26:08 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

There's a lot of charm in those old engines. I have only one of them left -- an O&R from the '60s (I think -- maybe the '50s).
It's interesting that we never feel that from electric motors. <g> The motor that powers my bench disk sander is a 1-hp GE Century from before WWII. It's as big as a microwave oven, and all of the inertia makes for a great disk sander. But it has as much charm as a sump pump.
--
Ed Huntress

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On Sun, 06 Dec 2015 21:03:18 -0500, Ed Huntress

I've got an old universal (brushed DC- shunt wound) motor that weighs about 75 lbs - likely about 1/2 HP - built back around the first world war. A bit more charm to it than a split phase Induction motor. But not a lot.
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On Sun, 06 Dec 2015 21:03:18 -0500, Ed Huntress

Junior's FiL is looking for a non-leaking gas tank for the B&S type 5 on his roto tiller.
--

Gerry :-)}
London,Canada
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On Sun, 06 Dec 2015 21:03:18 -0500, Ed Huntress

That - sump pump with the vertical shaft and column removed - is what powers my Dunlap jigsaw.
--

Gerry :-)}
London,Canada
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On Mon, 07 Dec 2015 19:14:22 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

Mine is from our first dishwasher. <g> You're the only other person I know who has a Dunlop jigsaw. I still have to make a blade guide for it. The old one plumb wore out, and I haven't used it for at least ten years.
--
Ed Huntress

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On Mon, 07 Dec 2015 19:19:32 -0500, Ed Huntress

I made a blade guide/hold down foot from a die cast, floor mount door stop.
--

Gerry :-)}
London,Canada
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On Wed, 09 Dec 2015 21:21:49 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

Now, THAT's using what ya' got. <g> Mine has a rubber bushing in the overarm which, I think, used to hold the hold-down. My fingers are my hold-down.
I got mine for free when an old guy I knew was cleaning out his basement. It's cut a lot of wood.
--
Ed Huntress

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On Wed, 09 Dec 2015 21:44:39 -0500, Ed Huntress

I paid $i.25 for mine at a church men's club auction in 1970 it has bee the first power tool for thee boys. I used jewelers blades quite often to cut up to 1/8" steel. I did replace the bushings several years ago.
--

Gerry :-)}
London,Canada
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    [ ... jigsaw ... ]

    O.K. A question. Did you mean $1.25 (what it sort of looks like), or perhaps $8.25 or $9.25 (the two number keys closest to the 'i' key? (Assuming a normal QWERTY keyboard.)
    Enjoy         DoN.
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Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | (KV4PH) Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
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wrote:

Sorry bout that, it was $1.25
--

Gerry :-)}
London,Canada
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