Drive-in Internet robotic installation

Hi. Any comments how much and how successfully robotics could meet the following challenge? Robotic arms crashing through the car window
accidentally would seem the major hurdle?
Drive-in Internet
Just off the freeway drive into an open-air archway and park the car. Pay your money into machine and wind your windows down. Maximum four people, two front and two in rear seats. Mechanical arms extend into the car through each window and drop open a screen with keyboard. Connected to the fast Internet, from the comfort of the car, you and your passengers can check your email or surf for the time duration you have paid for. Potential uses include visitors such as tourists approaching an unknown city that they wish to check-out (i.e. nightclub venues) on the Internet possibly only minutes before arriving. Also could be popular with adolescent online game players, allowing competitive challenges between different parts of country between cars. Might even cut down on anti-social behaviour in the way that drive-in movies provide an alternative to bars serving alcohol. In colder countries a flexible hot air tube might be an additional extra to maintain the inside air temperature of the car because of its windows being fully open.
This invention is specifically targeted at those on lower incomes or with different priorities whom would be unlikely to have a laptop (thus an online computer games angle for teenagers). Many people also may be very much into the Internet but only own a desktop PC as laptops can break/outdate/be stolen. Even youngish people owning laptops when going out into the city for a night to party would not usually bring a laptop with them. For instance the security issue with leaving a laptop in the car while in a nightclub is prohibitive. Even dad going on holiday with the family might be reluctant to complicate or spoil the trip by bringing his business along with him. He and the family might however might want to stop outside the city before driving in and check out the museums online. For this the drive-in Internet serves well.
The drive-in Internet concept is really meant to be an automatic and rugged installation. Like a carwash. Simply hiring laptops to the public at a fixed point with wi-fi connections and not using robotics would mean placing 4 laptops through a car window by hand which would require a lot of manpower. Certainly more than the typical token activated "car wash" which has minimal supervision. That would really hike costs over the long term. Also accidental damage to the equipment might be high as laptops can be easily dropped. The robot operated concept I am advocating might need careful design (not least being the safety mechanism to prevent the mechanical arms attempting to push the console through a closed car window!) but it cannot be dropped etc. The rented wireless laptop would also require individual configuration and independent software. The robotic concept would allow software to be shared off a main connecting server, perhaps serving 10 x 4 (40) consoles. Thus software and software maintenance would be minimal (ASP software model). Lastly even if financial deposits could be collected through credit cards etc this would exclude the lower income groups that "out for a burger" might be a solid customer base. While no one will drive off with a robotic arm console without damaging their vehicle, clearly laptop theft would be a problem whatever the deposit. However this idea might work well in a closed business environment such as a business or science park where the customer base was limited to office workers having lunch at an outdoor cafe etc.
The design of a solid, safe, rugged and reliable robotic arm console controller would be very expensive. Probably in the millions of dollars. However such costs would have to be shared in a franchise of a successful infrastructure across various countries. The land itself for such an installation would not be expensive as it is conceived not as competing with central cyber-cafes but in being located out-of-town on cheaper land rent locations that can be reached easily by car. I would reiterate my point about the system being along the lines of a slot machine or single cashier token payment system. Security cameras could easily be used to record car numberplates as at petrol stations to prevent vandalism etc. Again while the initial machine design and build would be in the millions, the software cost in being limited to a server and not configured on individual machines would be quite low. Obviously the revenues generated per hour per machine if each infrastructure could manage a maximum capacity of 10 x 4 (40) consoles would, in my opinion, be enough to cover development, build and running costs, and generate profit within a two or three year period. Please tell me, do you foresee any other "liability" costs other than theft or damage to the robotic installation itself? =+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+Project First Cup inventions development program supports the frank exchange of ideas, concepts and prototypes likely to lead to commercial success. Project First Cup requests acknowledgement as first source when things succeed. Please visit www.tide2000.com/feedback to discuss this invention and others.
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The arms attached to the people in the car are perfectly able to move a laptop without assistance, mechanical or human.
The question is, why would the consumer prefer this to parking and walking into an internet cafe with a better seat, bigger screen, better mouse, and better sound?
--
Guy Macon, Electronics Engineer & Project Manager for hire.
Remember Doc Brown from the _Back to the Future_ movies? Do you
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