diesel for home heating boiler

In an emergency could you put kerosene or diesel in your home oil heating
tank? Would it cause any damage?
Reply to
habbi
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Diesel is essentially #2 fuel oil, dyed to foil tax evaders. Kerosene is lighter than #2, but fine for short periods. Neither will do any damage, I hate to say I've done it more than a few times when we missed a delivery.
Reply to
ATP
I will work. Should not cause any problems. I used to run used motor oils, old diesel fuels and most anything else that would burn that did not have a low flash point (I assume its a low flash point such as gasoline and lac thinners etc) in my old oil burner I used to heat my shop with when I lived up north. Been running a home shop foundry now with the same type of unit for a couple of months and burning nothing but used motor oils and diesel fuels and its just as hot as when I used heating oil. And it really does not smoke once its good and hot. I really think used motor oils and diesel is a bit hotter than heating oil is. Visit my website:
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Reply to
Roy
Home heating oil *is* diesel that is slightly less refined than the kind they sell to use as automotive fuel. It is closely related to kerosene which is exactly the same only slightly less refined than the fuel they put in large turbines (Navy ships) or jet airplanes.
I believe the very worst you could do is clog a jet that would take just minutes to clean out. I say go for it. - GWE
habbi wrote:
Reply to
Grant Erwin
In the northeast it is common to fill a tank with a high percentage of Kero, or all Kero to prevent jelling of the fuel on those -20 degree days...
I run one of my hot air "oil burners" with nothing but "K-1" or Diesel fuel all winter. Should work fine. I recommend a very good filter on your unit IF you use a nozzle that is In an emergency could you put kerosene or diesel in your home oil heating
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Reply to
BEAR
A close friend of mine used to do this all the time - run down to the station that sold diesel fuel when he forgot to pay his oil bill, and the tank was running dry. He used to have a few five gallon tins used expressly for this purpose.
He never had any problem doing this.
Jim
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Reply to
jim rozen
In an emergency could you put kerosene or diesel in your home oil heating tank? ^^^^^^^^^^^ It would also be nice if the diesel came from a non-road-taxed source.
When I drove a Toyota diesel truck, I was told that if I ran out of fuel in a remote location, to look for someplace I could bum some heating oil. So it works both ways.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
I burn regular diesel in the "torpedo" shop heater. Its easier for me to get and cheaper than kero in my particular location at $1.59ga USD
Gunner
'If you own a gun and have a swimming pool in the yard, the swimming pool is almost 100 times more likely to kill a child than the gun is.'" Steven Levitt, UOC prof.
Reply to
Gunner
On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 15:55:35 GMT, "ATP" brought forth from the murky depths:
Aren't there 2 different types of diesel? I can smell the difference in trucks when I follow. Some smell clean and nice, more like jet fuel. Others smell like a candle wick which has just been snuffed out, very bad and wax-based.
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Reply to
Larry Jaques
There's no choice at the pump that I've seen, although there are different additives in the winter to retard gelling. Barring the use of biodiesel, which reportedly smells like french fries, the difference is probably in the truck powerplants. NY is now doing opacity tests on heavy vehicle inspections, although I think very old vehicles are exempt.
Reply to
ATP
We had a heating problem just today. Was uncomfortably warm, we had to open some doors and windows.
Joel. phx
Reply to
Joel Corwith
How's it smell at shutdown compared to kero? How's the exhaust while running? Did you have to diddle with the air pressure setting?
-Carl
Reply to
Carl Byrns
A city wide blackout at Sat, 20 Dec 2003 14:03:52 GMT did not prevent "habbi" from posting to rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
Yes, you could. SHould you? I'd say no on the kerosene, yes for the diesel. Diesel oil and most heating oils are almost indistinguishable, save for the taxes. Back in the autoshop we "raided" the heating oil tank a number of times to get fuel for diesel motors.
That I can't tell you. -- pyotr filipivich "We don't support "guns" ... the term "gun" gets in the way of what is really being talked about here - we want choice in personal security devices." Ann Coulter
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
It seems to run just a smidge hotter, so I just backed off the pump pressure a fraction of a turn. That was last year. This year the air pump has packed up, and I ran an air line to the unit from one of the shop air manifolds, with a regulator on it. If I have an electrical failure..it will still continue to pump a very fine mist of diesel until I can hit the shutoff valve. Shrug..Ive tried to fix the air pump..but it needs replacement
As to the smell..its not much different, more Diesel than kero smell. The smoke is about the same, once it gets hot, there is little odor.
Gunner
'If you own a gun and have a swimming pool in the yard, the swimming pool is almost 100 times more likely to kill a child than the gun is.'" Steven Levitt, UOC prof.
Reply to
Gunner
Oh..I should mention this was dug out of a dumpster.
Gunner
'If you own a gun and have a swimming pool in the yard, the swimming pool is almost 100 times more likely to kill a child than the gun is.'" Steven Levitt, UOC prof.
Reply to
Gunner

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