Do people lubricate drill press columns?

Powermatic recommends a "light film of oil" on drill press
columns. (per my manual. It does not specify which oil. Any
suggestions?
How about air tool oil?
My issue with this drill press is that the table is not so easy to
move. That's because there is no crank handle to move it, it is held
on the column with a tightening screw and needs to be moved by hand
when the screw is un-tightened.
So it tended to slide down a lot.
I made a really nice counterweight system last night, with a 4x force
multiplier by use of tiny rope pulleys, which makes a counterweight to
the table weight. It made it a lot nicer. (I will make pictures
tonight). Now I want a almost perfectly smooth motion.
Hence my question about lubrication.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus16651
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220 weight way oil. eg. the stuff made for vertical ways rather than horizontal ones.
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
That must be way thick!
Reply to
Jerry Wass
Mark, thanks, that's just what I need.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus16651
I spray all of mine with the "liquid" white lithium grease that comes in an aerosol can. When the solvent dries, it "thickens" up to form a nice thin film.
Reply to
David Courtney
How about graphite or paste wax? Or both.
Reply to
fredfighter
I have some graphite spray. I will try it on some piece of metal first, and if it looks good I will apply it to the column.Thanks
i
Reply to
Ignoramus16651
When I got mine, It was a little greasy, so I haven't had to lube the column. I'd go with the vert. way lube someone else suggested. As for the lifting device on my bench mount, I have a 3000# scissor jack atop the base to lift the table. I can't believe how smooth it works. Found it somewhere in RCM in the google archives.
Reply to
John L. Weatherly
Be careful using graphite or Moly . Remember , you also want it to stay where you clamp it . I've always just used enough light machine oil to keep it from rusting - gun oil works well too .
Reply to
Snag
I have some gun oil, also. Thanks.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus16651
220 CentiStokes, so about three times as viscous as SAE20 motor oil, plus additional tackiness additives. So yes, way thick, vertically so :-)
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
Yes. Though wax works better. Grease and oil tend to be dust/dirt magnets on columns
Gunner
"Liberalism is a philosophy of consolation for Western civilization as it commits suicide" - James Burnham
Reply to
Gunner
In Florida, I use an anti-rust lubricant/protectant - Birchwood-Casey's Sheath or Midway's Rust Prevent on all bare machine surfaces.... Joel on the rust coast.
Reply to
joelblatt
What breaks on it?
Reply to
John L. Weatherly
I wonder how that would work in an enviroment where a Clausing drill press is drilling aprox 1 - 5 5/8 dia x .300 to .750 holes per part every 3 minutes in cast iron. For some reason, the elevation gear box gets broken periodically.
Wouldn't that grab and hold metal dust?
Wes
Reply to
clutch
Our people here manage to break one elevator box about every year.
Inevitably, it's due to some mook who "forgets" the table is locked, and honks on the crank until something gives.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Didn't say it was a good idea, just what the stuff was :-)
One assumes that Gunners suggestion of a wax would do a much better job where there is cast iron dust or wood dust about. Or fit gaiters to the column maybe.
the problem I have with my far-east floor mounting drill press (apart from it not having power feed or a geared head or any rigidity or coolant etc) is not friction between the table and the column but friction between the rack and the gear that raises the table. Luckily I have an older, better bench mounting drill press in the garage that I'll move into the workshop when I get round to making a stand for it.
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
In this case the elevation gearbox is on the head since the 'table' is a balancing spindle.
I'm thinking it could be an issue with the locks and brain activity.
Wes
Reply to
clutch

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