Do people use coolant with high speed spindle attachments?

Still kind of chicken about running a high speed spindle (a Bosch router) without coolant. So my question is, do people use coolant at,
say, 10k RPM? 20k? I would say the OD of the spindle nut is 1 inch.
i
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The super fast machines I have seen on You Tube all appear to use moderately high volume flood coolant. There are plenty of people who claim they dry cut at 10-24K, but cutter life suffers. Also sticking happens more often if you try to get a little aggressive. I dry cut a lot, but if I care about the finish of the part I stand there with a can of WD in my hand (aluminum only).
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Got any links to videos? I was thinking, for starters, 10-15 K RPM, 1/4" cutter.
i
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MmtRetal54


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L5aC5Kpvibc


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I3ACIOd4Jpw

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Well, since you have (IIRC) a big honking compressor, you could use the less messy coolant (air, with or without a [noisy, airhogging] vortex tube thang to make it even colder...)
--
Cats, coffee, chocolate...vices to live by

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On Thu, 09 Sep 2010 10:56:17 -0500, Ignoramus13544

Air only. Maybe a mist..but definately Air only
Gunner
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I bet. At 10,000 rpm, it will be hard to keep the tool wet, even if flooded.
Joe Gwinn
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I actually fixed up my air mister. And I have a question, actually two
1) How bad is vegetable air mist oil for lungs 2) Just how much mess will it make with chips flying all over the place?
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All oils are bad. For that matter, so are all metalworking fluids, with the sole exception of pure water. Back when I used a mister, the mist gave me a form of bronchitis, and I ended up wearing a real facemask. I looked like a Preying Mantis. Nor was the mist as effective as I would hope, unless it was very heavy. The shop looked like a fogbank. This is why I went to flood or dribble cooling.

Quite a lot. Full enclosure is probably a good idea. Negative pressure isn't a bad idea either, and isn't hard to arrange. I bet 10000 rpm spindles generate a lot of aluminum dust.
Joe Gwinn
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On Sat, 11 Sep 2010 09:34:07 -0500, Ignoramus1469

Not great. Depends on your lungs and how well they get rid of oil and other debris

Slightly less than oil/coolant soaked chips flying all over the place. It sweeps up easier.
Gunner
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Ignoramus1469 wrote:

Finely atomized oils, of ANY kind, are quite bad for the lungs! There is a finite capacity for the lungs to remove foreign materials, and liquids which don't mix with water are difficult for the cilia to sweep upward. I forget the exact medical term, but the common term is oil pneumonia. The lungs start producing large quantities of fluid trying to dilute the oil so it can be coughed up, which, of course, doesn't work.
This can sneak up on you, and when you realize you have a problem, it is too late to do anything about it. It can take months to recover from a dose of oil mist.
Mess is not the problem, the chips will be ever so slightly coated with a hint of an oily film, assuming you have the mister running at a low level.
Jon
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