Easy way to bend 1/8 inch sheet metal?

I need to bend a lip on some 1/8 inch thick 3 inch wide sheet metal. Is
their an easy way to do this at home with no bender?
Reply to
stryped
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Heat it nice and red, put it in a vise, and pull hard. I like using an oxy-acetylene torch to heat only the area of the bend. You should be able to do the same bend using a hammer and anvil, again red hot.
You might be able to bend it cold by putting it in a vise and hitting it with a 2 pound hammer.
Richard
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Reply to
Richard Ferguson
Did you use a "rosebud" tip?
Gunner
Rule #35 "That which does not kill you, has made a huge tactical error"
Reply to
Gunner
Just as soon as the metal starts to glow is hot enough to do some bending. You want to heat the piece before putting in the vise. The best way is to hold it with some pliers or tongs and get the line hot along with the rest of the piece a ways back and place on an anvil and bend it over the edge, basic blacksmithing.
-- Why isn't there an Ozone Hole at the NORTH Pole?
Reply to
Bob May
wrote: I need to bend a lip (clip) at home with no bender? ^^^^^^^^^^^^ How wide a lip? It may be easier to bend a wide lip, and then cut to the width you need.
As someone else has pointed out, trying to heat it while holding in the vise is almost impossible. Maybe you could make up some kind of a slotted jig, so you can get the metal nice and red, then slide it in and quickly do the bend.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
A method that has worked for me is to clamp the sheet metal between 2 pieces of angle steel, at least 1/4" thick and 2" or more wide, and at least as long as the piece you want to bend. Use a lot of clamps and leave enough of the sheet metal sticking out from between the steel angles to form the lip, plus a bit extra to allow for the radius of the bend. It helps to round off the corner of the angle that the lip will be bent over to avoid possibly cracking the sheet metal by bending it too sharply. Use a hardwood block between the hammer and the metal if hammer marks on the finished piece are a problem. Mike
Reply to
KyMike
Acetylene is not the same as *oxy*acetylene. O/A should give no problem at all w/ this. Doubt if you will need Gunner's rosebud, which btw should not be used w/ a B-tank, only full-sized acetylene tanks. Heat it up on some bricks, which will retain more heat in the metal, heat from the middle out. Mebbe heat from the bottom, rather than from the top. Could also preheat the whole piece in an oven, as hot as you can get it. Keep heating. :) Actually, for this job, you might have to worry about O/A being too intense, poss. melting through. Also, a lot of people heat w/ a cutting torch, which is OK, I spose, but iffin all I'm doing is heating, I use a regular welding tip. ymmv. Oh yeah, ahm no 'spert. ---------------------------- Mr. P.V.'d formerly Droll Troll
Reply to
Proctologically Violated©®
I think this advice would be good in conjunction w/ O/A, but not by itself.
Bear in mind that a "sheet" of 1/8 steel is not really "sheet metal", as in HVAC or the "tin knocker's" sense--it's not quite "plate", either, sort of mebbe in a limbo. A 4x8 "sheet" of 1/8 steel weighs 180 lbs! I think the steel houses might call the1/8 inch stuff "strip". ---------------------------- Mr. P.V.'d formerly Droll Troll
Reply to
Proctologically Violated©®
What size tip? Do you have the flame adjusted properly? Put a windshield around your work area? How long do you heat it for? You basically just keep oscillating the tip back and forth along the bend line until it gets orange hot, if not,see above.
Reply to
Terry Collins
wrote: By the way, what is the best way to tell I have a proper flame? ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ That question is so basic, I would say you are not ready to be using the torch yet, without supervision. It can be deadly.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman

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