Electrified turbocharger

This looks like a better solution than the supercharger/turbocharger combo: Continental and Valeo are both working on "electrified"
turbochargers:
http://www.autonews.com/article/20150622/OEM04/306229975/continental-says-its-working-heavily-on-electrified-turbo
These use electric motors to spool up the turbo at idle and low speeds, so it's putting out boost pressure right from the start. The objective is the same, to eliminate turbo lag.
--
Ed Huntress

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Ed Huntress wrote:

Old tech....
http://www.electricsupercharger.com/ http://www.phantomsuperchargers.com/ http://www.wildweasel.ca/HowTo/Auto/eturboTest.aspx
--
Steve W.

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wrote:

Those are not really the same thing. The first one is an axial fan that provides 1 psi of boost. The second and third are just electric centrifugal superchargers.
As for electric superchargers, Garrett (now Honeywell) has one that's either in production or about to go into production. There have been several of them over the years, but none of them come close to the Honeywell unit in terms of practicality. The electric fan and supercharger listed in your links are not in the same league.
What these "electrified" turbos are about is bottom-end boost with turbo fuel efficiency. The electric drive is just for low rpm. Otherwise, it's a regular exhaust-driven turbocharger. It's not an easy problem to solve. But two of the world's top Tier 1 suppliers are close to market with their versions, so we'll see something pretty soon.
--
Ed Huntress

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On Tue, 23 Jun 2015 09:36:55 -0400, Ed Huntress wrote:

says-its-working-heavily-on-electrified-turbo

It'll be interesting to see how it plays out, particularly with keeping an electric motor happy when it's being run up close to the exhaust system.
Next will be electro-turbo-compound engines, where, at high speed, the turbine motors are used as generators. Given enough power handling capability in the turbo motor you could use it instead of a waste gate to regulate boost; this would work especially well in a hybrid.
Hybrid electro-turbo-compound variable timing multi-BS whatnot.
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
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On Tue, 23 Jun 2015 17:03:56 -0500, Tim Wescott

Speaking of turbines, you may have noticed that GE has finally developed a ceramic that will work as hot-side components (blades, blisks, etc.) in turbine engines. I wrote my first story about GE's work on this in 1979. Finally, they seem to have figured it out.
In '79, their more modest goal was to develop a ceramic that would work in automotive turbochargers. They seem to have leapt over that one.
--
Ed Huntress

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Turbo lag - tell me about it. I had a 2L Turbo. Did nice on the freeway and here and there. Coming to a stop sign and then merge into the far side traffic land when traffic is going both ways is exciting. The little 2Liter would put put across the first lane and make the curve to the left. Sometime before a crash, the turbo would cut in and move you out of there. Bad design if merging on freeway unless the line is long and open - then speed is possible if lane is clear.
Martin - it was a 2.2L Turbo
On 6/23/2015 8:36 AM, Ed Huntress wrote:

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