ever seen a Bridgeport coffee mill?

I'm a newbie coffee roaster, don't have a real espresso grinder yet so I'm still
using my '70s yard sale KYM, a little German burr grinder. When I crank it down
to get an espresso grind it's pretty hard to run 1/4 cup of beans through there,
lot of work. This is my solution, quick & dirty, thought you guys might get a
kick out of it:
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Grant Erwin
Kirkland, Washington
Reply to
Grant Erwin
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I'll bet that gets it done in a *hurry*. What rpm can you run it before Bad Things happen? =)
Reply to
StaticsJason
Now if we can come up with a cotton candy attachment, that would be exciting for the family.
Reply to
Richard J Kinch
Necessity IS the mother of invention...:) especially where caffeine is concerned. I have a pop can sized 120v 1/4 cup espresso grinder distributed by Starbucks. Picked it up in '97. The thing cranks; Won't die. JR Dweller in te cellar
Grant Erw> I'm a newbie coffee roaster, don't have a real espresso grinder yet so
Reply to
JR North
Grant, YOU are my hero! (tears running down our faces here)
(We have use the 60 ton Bliss to make Schnitzel)
Reply to
Tom Gardner
I love it lazy and smart.
Reply to
Jim Sehr
This is my *only* burr grinder for the moment, Jason - resolving your question precisely would involve destructive testing. Therefore this becomes a for-money proposal: to get an answer to your question will require that you provide me another grinder prior commencement of testing.
I run it at the lowest backgear speed, something like 80 rpm, a tad more than once per second, only a little faster than I turn it by hand. The difference in the pain level in my arm however is striking.
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
HOT DAMN! I could use my 35-ton ironworker's bar shear to cut up racks of ribs!
Tom, you are my idol ..
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
On Sat, 04 Mar 2006 16:19:19 -0800, with neither quill nor qualm, Grant Erwin quickly quoth:
Man, can you say "Overkill"? I knew you could. What kind of low-end speed does that baby (Herr BridgeP) have? You'd fry that grinding puppy in a few seconds at most milling speeds.
That's a keeper photo, fer sher.
-------------------------------------------------------------------- The more we gripe, *
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longer God makes us live. * Graphic Design - Humorous T-shirts
Reply to
Larry Jaques
On Sat, 04 Mar 2006 19:18:12 -0600, with neither quill nor qualm, Richard J Kinch quickly quoth:
For more fun, go Google rec.woodworking for the 1997 story of "resawed beans" or the 2001 story entitled "Router Accident in the Kitchen". They're keepers, too.
I'll look for the pic which synced with the resawed beans thread. It had something to do with a chainsaw and a frozeded turkey.
-------------------------------------------------------------------- The more we gripe, *
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longer God makes us live. * Graphic Design - Humorous T-shirts
Reply to
Larry Jaques
While we're on the "misuse of tools" theme, I once used a 26.5" hydraulic paper cutter to slice a grinder for lunch.
Pete C.
Reply to
Pete C.
I regularly haul ribs and other meat out to the walker turner bandsaw and slab them. Cut off a boars head on the Emerson horizontal bandsaw pretty neatly. I did turn off the coolant pump and put a pan down.
But I like the paper slicer idea
Gunner
"A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them; the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences." - Proverbs 22:3
Reply to
Gunner
ROFL! Nothing succeeds like excess...
I have a 'Mr. Fusion' for that. (AKA a Krups Type 57a.)
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
the limit. I certainly wouldn't so ANY food processing on mine, because I take great care to keep the expensive spindle bearings well-lubed, and the spindle drips oil all over everything, ALWAYS at the worst time. What does spindle oil taste like? I DON'T want to know! (Actually, I do know, as it sometimes sprays it off the collet when I start it up at high speed.)
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
I think it was in "The Mote in God's Eye" where the "Moties" found a few drops of light machine oil really spiced up hot chocolate.
It takes all kinds...
Richard
Reply to
Richard Lamb
My first attempt, at age 18, was an electric mixer. I cut the crank off an old manual egg beater and chucked the stub in my 2000 RPM electric drill. After washing down the kitchen walls ................ Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
Ok -
I read some of the flabbergasted responses - so I have to ask :
Had to use a 6" Kurt to hold the box into position did we ?
I now - no stinking import junk pot metal vise to hold my coffee grounds - !
Martin
Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder
Grant Erw> I'm a newbie coffee roaster, don't have a real espresso grinder yet so
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
More misuse of tools:
I spent a summer as a welder's assistant, holding pieces as we cut up an old steel building. If the welder wanted a smoke, he'd take a cigarette out of his shirt pocket with his left hand, stick it in his mouth, turn the torch, hit the oxygen and then go back to the cut without a wobble. First time he did it scared the shit out of me. When we got to a break I asked him how often he'd burned his nose (he wore goggles). He replied, in his oil patch drawl, "Ain't done that but I've had some pretty short smokes".
Yikes!
Jim
Reply to
Jim McGill
I worked for awhile in a small shipyard and we had one welder who was an animal. There were pigeons roosting in the rafters in the steel shop, and one day he brought in his 22 rifle with some low-v ammo and plinked one of the pigeons. Then he plucked it, cleaned it, wrapped it in tin foil, and stuck it in the welding rod oven to slow-cook all morning. He ate it for lunch, and walked around all day with one of the pigeon's feet sticking out of the pencil pocket on his overalls, and the other foot he sucked on all day like a toothpick.
Swear to God ..
Grant Erwin
Jim McGill wrote:
Reply to
Grant Erwin
What a great idea, to shoot at a roof with a rifle...
i
Reply to
Ignoramus23035

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