GLOVES !!!!!!! A Dangerous Subject in This Group

I've been doing some pretty detailed machining in 4140 HT using HSM methods and it results in millions of tiny little needles. My hands are
paying the price. I never wear gloves around any of the machines. I have work gloves for lifting, hauling toting and general labor, but they never go anywhere any of the machine tools, saws, drill press etc, and of course I have welding gloves for welding.
However, when I reach inside a machine to take out one of those steel parts no matter how well I think I have blown it off those tiny steel needles jump for my hands worse than a jumping cholla cactus leans towards human flesh. I've mostly done aluminum int he past I don't think I've ever gotten an aluminum sliver in my hand, but my hands have dozens of tiny metal splinters in them right now.
What's a machinist to do? Making bigger chips isn't really an option. Well for part of the job it is, and I do, but for a lot of the job it just isn't.
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I've been doing some pretty detailed machining in 4140 HT using HSM methods and it results in millions of tiny little needles. My hands are paying the price. I never wear gloves around any of the machines. I have work gloves for lifting, hauling toting and general labor, but they never go anywhere any of the machine tools, saws, drill press etc, and of course I have welding gloves for welding.
However, when I reach inside a machine to take out one of those steel parts no matter how well I think I have blown it off those tiny steel needles jump for my hands worse than a jumping cholla cactus leans towards human flesh. I've mostly done aluminum int he past I don't think I've ever gotten an aluminum sliver in my hand, but my hands have dozens of tiny metal splinters in them right now.
What's a machinist to do? Making bigger chips isn't really an option. Well for part of the job it is, and I do, but for a lot of the job it just isn't.
Faced with a simular situation once upon a time i found that a shop vac removed most of the little buggers and greatly reduced sliver removal tasks.
Best Regards Tom.
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On Fri, 9 Mar 2018 10:18:36 -0700, Bob La Londe wrote:

Becasue I'm forced to use miniscule chip loads, I get stuck with those *&^%$ little needles all the time. I haven't found any really good solution. I use a shop vac, chip brush & towels to grab the parts. I'm afraid of using compressed air - I don't want to spread those needles all over the place. A stero microscope comes in very handy when I can't see them naked-eye to pull them out.
Hopefully someone knows of something better.
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I used barrier cream in the past. It kept the chips that haven't yet embedded from doing so, and you just wash it off with water.
For the past 20 years, though, I've used the thin grloves that Steve recommends. The tough, industrial nitrile gloves are a lot better than the Home Depot painter's gloves.
But I just do fairly light hobby machining. When I worked in a job shop, I used barrier cream and it actually did a pretty good job.
BTW, if you have embedded steel chips and you need an MRI, you're screwed.
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On 3/9/2018 1:49 PM, Ed Huntress wrote:

come out !
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wrote:


That can be true! However, you can imagine the consequences. <g>
Actually, there are three possible things that can happen, the first with ferromagnetic or non-ferromagnetic metal and the other two with ferromagnetic material. These are not counting the fact that any metal is likely to blue the MRI image and can make it useless.
The first is heating, which depends on the frequency coupling of the chip with the metal. It's very unlikely, but it has happened.
The second is polar alignment of the chips. Ouch. They can develop quite a lot of torque under your skin.
The third is the result of extreme attraction of the chips to the MRI magnets. It can literally rip them out of your skin.
Don't panic; all three are unlikely. But a chip in your eye that is otherwise benign can blind you for life if subjected to the pull of an MRI.
So take it seriously. And make sure they have metal detectors on hand and use them if you tell them that you machine metal.
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On Fri, 09 Mar 2018 17:00:39 -0500, Ed Huntress


Ed, Years ago I had an MRI done on my head to look for a possible tumor. When they found out I was a machinist they first had me get a cat scan of my eyes. They told me that the MRI would drag magnetic slivers right through my eye. Not fun. Eric
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On Wed, 14 Mar 2018 10:11:30 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:


Jeez, yeah. I read about this when I was a medical editor. Apparently that is the scariest prospect for a machinist getting an MRI.
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Bob La Londe wrote:

Shop vac first. If this is CNC work get a thick pair of nitrile gloves. They will fit like a second skin and if you did get snagged they will tear apart easily.
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Steve W.

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"Bob La Londe" wrote in message
I've been doing some pretty detailed machining in 4140 HT using HSM methods and it results in millions of tiny little needles. My hands are paying the price. I never wear gloves around any of the machines. I have work gloves for lifting, hauling toting and general labor, but they never go anywhere any of the machine tools, saws, drill press etc, and of course I have welding gloves for welding.
However, when I reach inside a machine to take out one of those steel parts no matter how well I think I have blown it off those tiny steel needles jump for my hands worse than a jumping cholla cactus leans towards human flesh. I've mostly done aluminum int he past I don't think I've ever gotten an aluminum sliver in my hand, but my hands have dozens of tiny metal splinters in them right now.
What's a machinist to do? Making bigger chips isn't really an option. Well for part of the job it is, and I do, but for a lot of the job it just isn't. ====================================================I've never done this, just thinking out loud, so this is worth what you are paying :-). Since you are removing the part there are no alignment or repeatability issues so can you use a pair of pliers (channel locks with the longest handles you have) or even one of those "grabber" wands with rubber tips if the parts are light enough? You could put rubber tubing over the plier jaws if you don't have any actual soft jaw pliers. Shop vac everything you can, then lift the part out and go directly into the parts washer for rinsing without touching it (or into a box and then into the washer later but again, using pliers or gloves to handle the parts until washed).
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Regards,
Carl Ijames
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On Fri, 9 Mar 2018 14:34:34 -0500, "Carl Ijames"

I've heard of duct tape being used for tiny cactus spines. Not a preventive measure, but maybe it'd help get them out of your hide.
When I get steel slivers, they don't seem to bother me that long. Stainless are bad, though.
Pete Keillor
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Bob La Londe wrote:

Yup, classic problem, I've had it, too. I don't think thin gloves will really help, the needles will likely go right through. You may be able to vacuum the work area first, then pass a magnet over the work and fixture to pick up more. Then, wipe the part down with a paper towel with something like LPS-1 on it to pick up the last needles.
I'd love to know what the pros do about this.
Jon
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wrote:

Can you use a few more exclamation points, Bob? I don't think we quite grasp what you are exclaiming.

I think Pete clued us to the answer: duct tape gloves.

They hire underlings to get =their= hands spiny.
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On Friday, March 9, 2018 at 12:18:36 PM UTC-5, Bob La Londe wrote:


magnet in a plastic bag. Should be able to attract the steel needles to the plastic bag and then remove the magnet from the bag so you can dump the needles in to the trash.
Have not done this but ought to work.
Dan
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wrote:

Greetings Bob, I know what you mean about gloves. I just shudder thinking about a leather glove dragging my fingers into the band saw. I showed a guy recently how he would probably not be able to pull his hand away fast enough if the blade caught a glove finger. Watching that old TIG glove being pulled from his light grip convinced him. Anyway, I use 6 mil nitrile gloves for the kind of work you are doing. I use snug fitting gloves and make sure there are no moving parts to catch the gloves. Splinters don't penetrate the gloves as easily as soft skin and if one does get through it will usually come out with the glove being removed. Eric
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