Grizzly Delivery

Greetings All,
I decided to order a Grizzly G1006 milling machine which has a shipping
weight of 670lb. I want the machine in my garage which is located about
30' from the curb at the end of down-sloping concrete driveway.
The folks at Grizzly tell me that:
1. the carrier will only bring it to the curb-side.
2. that I do have an option of asking for a lift-gate truck.
3. any other arrangements are between me and the shipping company.
4. they were unable to specify the shipping company prior to actual shipping.
I must admit that I am a bit confused about this.  How can they deliver a
package that size to a residential address _without_ a lift-gate?  Do they
just push it off the end of the truck?  Also, if I have the option of
paying for a lift-gate truck, why can't it back into my drive way and
deposit the package in my garage?
These folks must be handling this sort of purchases many times each day. 
I have to wonder why they don't have better answers.
I'd appreciate some advice on this noting that I have to be able to handle
the delivery and mounting the mill on the bench by myself.
AG 
Reply to
AG
Loading thread data ...
My guess is that they have a big semi delivering stuff, and it is difficult for them to back the trailer into people's driveways (they would block the road for long periods -- piss off motorists -- and have a lot of troubles). They probably do have a liftgate and would use it to lower stuff down on a liftgate and then they would just push it off the liftgate.
I think that a 670 lbs G1006 mill is very much a no big deal to handle, all you need is a shop crane on casters (or a separate wheeled platform) and a helper who can set chocks under wheels.
I unloaded a bigger mill from a trailer myself, and I am basically a chump when it comes to rigging. There are experts here who can walk you through the process, but I would not expect huge problems.
If you own tools like this mill, you need adequate material handling equipment to move them around, or else you will pay through your nose each time you need to move it.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus27556
Another option is to specify you are to be called when the mill reaches your local terminal and then rent a trailer and go pick it up yourself. The trucking company will be happy to load it for you.
Then you just need to do what Iggy said he did.
Paul
Ignoramus27556 wrote:
Reply to
pdrahn
Grizzly is independent of the trucking outfits. You know, the Teamsters. They are a rough bunch, and this is the system they have come up with. By "at the curb" they mean, on the back of the truck at the curb, not on the ground. You're supposed to be a business with a loading dock or forklift to take it off the truck. Residential deliveries are not just about lift-gating off the back of the truck, they also tend to turn into "stories", and they do deserve an extra charge.
No, they won't push it off the truck and smash it down on your driveway. The driver, if the typical wily coot, will insist you pay then and there for the lift, and if you balk, will threaten to leave and strongly imply that you'll just pay more for a 2nd trip if you don't submit to the extortion.
It comes down to, you either equip and train yourself to lift this thing on your own, or you pay them extra to do it for you.
See my experience:
formatting link
If you and your friends haven't got a loading dock, and don't want to pay for a liftgate, then the only alternative I know is to rent a truck for the day, and back it up end to end to skid the crate into your truck, and then you can take your time getting it down the rental truck ramp.
Reply to
Richard J Kinch
Grizzly will use various LTL common carriers that are set up to deliver to a standard loading dock. Since these firms are mostly regional and local delivery is just that, they usually have no idea what polices or equipment the local delivery company has. If the local company has suitable tailgate lift on the back of a single axle delivery truck, you can usually get them to back into the driveway and drop it. If they come out in a tractor/trailer combo, you will get street delivery only. It may sound like a RPITA but the truck companies make it abundently clear that they are doing you a major favor to do residential deliveries.
I have a small trailer, 1000 pound capacity, tilt bed, 16" deck height. Most of the truck companies have a low height dock, I drive over and pick it up, they fork lift it onto my trailer. At home, I back into the garage and skid it off. My local rental place will rent a similar (but MUCH heavier duty) low deck height trailer AND a suitable tow vehicle for about $60 a day
AG wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
It would also make shipping considerably cheaper.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus27556
=======================
You may want to consider using a depot to depot freight service such as ForwardAir. see
formatting link
Given that you will have to "manhandle" the crate from the curb to your shop, it may be just as easy and a lot cheaper to rent a u-haul trailer (or use a golf cart trailer if you can borrow one) and pick it up at the freight depot. Generally they will have a fork truck as will set it in the trailer for you.
With some cursing, you should be able to back the trailer up to or even inside the shop/garage door. (remember to make the trailer go right, turn left...)
Renting an engine hoist may be a good answer for setting the machine on the bench. Milling machines tend to be *VERY* top-heavy, so it can be helpful to have several people to help "stabalize" the machine, as long as they remember to get the f*** out of the way if things start to go south.
Good luck with your new toy.
Unka George (George McDuffee) ............................. I sincerely believe . . . banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies, and that the principle of spending money to be paid by posterity, under the name of funding, is but swindling futurity on a large scale. Thomas Jefferson (1743?1826), U.S. president. Letter, 28 May 1816, to political philosopher and Senator John Taylor
Reply to
F. George McDuffee
Carrier WILL help move it to garage, big $$$$, we are "carriers", not riggers
Lift gate is possible , more $$ normally on a 28' trailer for a residental delivery
arangements, ARE with carrier,
You could locate a carrier first then specify THEY pick it up at shipper
gary
Reply to
gary556
That is the best choice. It keeps costs down for both parties. I picked up a 20" bandsaw that way and I saw a few other guys picking up stuff that would not be deliverable to a private residence w/o a lift gate.
Wes S
Reply to
clutch
670 lb. can be easily handled by even a small pickup. Have the freight company bring it to their terminal and go pick it up there. Just be sure to strap it down good so you don't tip it out of the pickup while you are hauling it and take it easy on corners... I recently hauled a 750 lb. surface grinder home (about 60 miles) on my old Nissan with no problems. A shop crane (engine hoist) can easily do the lifting or you can use my method: a chain hoist hooked to an overhead beam.
Jerry
Reply to
Jerry Foster

I guess I was lucky when I went throught the same thing a while ago. I was expecting a drop off and paid for the lift gate. The truck was a local freighter with a single axle tractor pulling maybe a 35' trailer. He pulled into the driveway and backed up to the shop door and used a pallet jack and unloaded inside- no charge!!! This was a 850lb crate that I was prepared to slide into a truck bed out on the road. The driver was a real pro in every regard.
I was told the drivers only can drop off on the road...when I arrainged the shipping...ya never know..
ED
Reply to
ED
Sometimes the people you speak to on the phone are the most unhelpful people imaginable, yet the actual delivery drivers are very willing to help.
I had a machine delivery which took five hours once. We got both his semi and 7-ton forklift stuck in the mud. The driver was great and we worked together to sort it out. He just said "I've never taken a machine home yet and I don't intend to start today".
You might be pleasantly surprised.
Best wishes,
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
Chris, I have ordered two machines from Grizzley and was told the same about both deliveries. I paid for the lift gate both times and both times the dirvers pulled the machine off of the truck and rolled it up the driveway with a pallet jack and placed it in my garage just where I asked. ( I may have been lucky but my experience seemed typical since I received the same level of service when I ordered a large horizontal/vertical saw from Enco ). As previously stated, an engine hoist and a few strong friends will place the machine on the stand with little problems. I rented a hoist twice when the machines were delivered, but decided to buy one of my own when I moved and realized that the machines would be moved on and off of the truck and then again hoisted on their stands a few weeks later. Having my own hoist simplified matters greatly. Having strong friends is one of the best tools for this job. Good Luck
Christ> > Greetings All,
Reply to
Fred
I made friends with a local tractor dealer who accepted delivery and they put it on my trailer for free.
Reply to
Mike
Note that this will work - but make /darned/ sure the overhead beam in the garage that you pick for a hoisting point will handle the weight. You might have to install jack-screws or temporary lally columns on each side of the truck to get the load straight to ground.
Beams for this discussion are either large chunks of I-beam steel, or large pieces of Glu-Lam or natural lumber measuring at least 4x10, the 2X8 ceiling joists do not count. Lift from a weak beam and you could have the whole building come down around your ears - and this would be bad...
-->--
Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
He was talking about shop crane, not chain hoist, like this
formatting link
and not like this
formatting link
Agreed
i
Reply to
Ignoramus27556
Can you just rent a pallet jack for the day? That way the driver can lower it to the street on the lift gate and you can take it from there. A pallet jack in the Chicago suburban area rents out at $30/day or $90/week, to give you an idea on cost.
I just had a 1300-lb crated mill delivered and the seller arranged for a truck with lift gate and pallet jack. They advised that it would be delivered to the curb also, so I suspect that this is a typical common carrier policy, possibly related to liability. The driveway is short, but slopes quite a bit and the driver decided it was worth backing up to the garage door to save the work of hauling it up the slope.
Mike
Reply to
Mike Henry
You'd have a good story to tell your grandchildren though .
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
Usually not a spectacular crash. Overloading trusses or beams in a stick built RESIDENTIAL building usually leads to sags that may or may not transmit to the roof, splintered joists, bent door headers, single beam broken, etc. I've worked on a several of these, one was a snowstorm that left a 5' snowdrift over the very center of a poorly designed hip roof connection point, another was a cottenwood resting on the roof, another was a 6"x8" wood beam where the end had sagged 5" (and MAJOR crack in the beam) without collapsing.
Pole barn construction or normal steel truss joist construction will collapse a full bay without too much overload. We lose a pole bar or two with each major snowstorm.
Christ> Bruce L. Bergman wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
Along with the others, I'd recommend renting a trailer and getting it at the terminal. My local truck lines have *always* been very helpful in loading the pallets onto my trailer. Once you get home you can back the trailer (or pickup truck) into the garage and use a hoist to unload, disassemble and unload, ... or bribe a few friends with pizza and beer :-)
Reply to
gspaff

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.