Have you ever needed to machine copper



Well, the glue is no good anymore, you have to use the clips I will send With the machine that does it, old people can't hear the click, click anymore, right? If you can just put some 60's rock & roll on like the rolling stones....

& it only cost so-& so , yea right. Oh well it's only paper money that China will "Loan" us?

Gee, that is only tooling needed for a job..& it should be a write off on taxes..

Yep, see above <G>.
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It machines really nice with PCD tooling. I used to size printing cylinders right out of the copper plating bath, prior to engraving and chrome plating. The biggest issue was birds nests.
--
Anthony

You can't 'idiot proof' anything....every time you try, they just make
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Yes, that's a problem, especially in production. I reported on an operation in western PA some years back that was turning disc-like copper pieces with autoloading lathes (Wasinos). Their biggest challenge was breaking up the birds' nests, which they finally accomlished after a lot of experimenting with feed rates and cutting angles.
-- Ed Huntress
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The rheostat studs were made from 3/4 round. But I've made bus-bar connector blocks as large as 2x2x2.
LLoyd
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wrote:

OK. Thanks. I will definitely hang on to it.
i
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What's wrong with you? I am unable to conceive of why anyone in their right mind would even consider letting a piece of ANY metal larger than a cubic inch, out of their clutches. Excuse me, have to go, just heard a bunch of noise from the garage, where I think a shelf collapsed....
/mark
Ignoramus5693 wrote:

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I am looking for steel and aluminum pieces, actually. I had doubts whether I need a copper bar of that size (I have other copper bars that I actually used).
The real problems begin when there is so much stuff in the garage that it turns into a Black Hole.
i
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Ignoramus5693 wrote:

The easiest way to find that out is to sell it.
Nick
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Copper is the nastiest stuff I have ever machined. Being a good heat conductor, soft, sticky, etc, it's just aweful. I made a number of custom cable swages for 1/8" aircraft cable, and it was a nightmare. 8 feet of 1/4" dia copper round bar got turned into 2" long pieces, faced both ends, and drilled through with a #29 drill. Some got stuck in collet blocks, clampled a wierd angles, and fishmouthed in preparation for brazing, while others got threaded #10-24. In the process I snapped 4 #29 drill bits and had my lathe drill chuck (this is a large toolroom lathe with a lever collet closer) pulled bodily out of the tailstock by the stickyness of the copper. It also transmitted heat very effectively, to the point where the heat of the drilling operation (this is with extensive mist coolant, no flood available) heated the collet to the point where it expanded and did not grip the part firmly. The project turned out well, but it was one of my least favorite machining experieces.
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Ignoramus5693 wrote:

One thing a big solid chunk of copper is good for is balling tungstens for use in welding aluminum. In fact, I would love to have a chunk of that bar two inches long if you ever decide to saw it up.
An old machinist once told me that if you do have to machine copper the cutting fluid you want to us - really, this isn't a gag - is milk! I think he suggested a can of evaporated milk.
Grant
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Grant, I thought one could ball tungstens with just a piece of scrap iron. I will let you know if I ever cut it up.

Sounds yucky, the work would smell rather bad in a few days. (don't ask me how I know)
i
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That really doesn't work. You want a metal that is as conductive as possible, both electrically and thermally. Short of precious metals, copper is the best you can do.
You can also use a chunk of copper as a backing bar for welds. I've used blocks of scrap aluminum for this too.
Grant
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On Wed, 01 Aug 2007 08:52:11 -0500, Ignoramus5693

Very useful for welding thin aluminum sheetmetal corners without blowing holes. The copper bar stops blowthrus by acting as a chill. Lightly chamfer a corner on the copper bar to create a bit of space under the corner to be welded. You don't want the bar to chill the puddle right in/on the joint. Clamp aluminum pieces to bar with the chamfer under the corner to be welded. Weld away!
I make boxes by welding up pieces of sheetmetal, because I don't have a brake to bend them. Even if I did, with welding I don't have to worry about bending allowances to get the dimensions right.
It's even handy with thin steel sheetmetal, because weld-thru (excessive penetration) won't stick to the copper; it'll just reinforce the inside of the corner.
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Don Foreman wrote:

WOW, I'd sure like to look over your shoulder while you did this! I was trying to TIG weld some gussets into a box I made of .060" 3003 last night. I almost destroyed the box. I should have set up some copper bars to keep the aluminum from melting. My big problem was the gussets would melt into a puddle before I got any melting of the box material, even though they were the same thickness. I'm pretty sure they were the same alloy, but something else could have gotten in the scrap bin.
After painting it will look OK until somebody opens the box, then it looks like hell!
I've got steel, SS and even copper down just PAT, but aluminum still drives me crazy. I don't know why. (I have a Lincoln Square-Wave TIG 300, supposed to be a good machine.)
Jon
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Practice, practice, practice; 5-10x as much as it took to get good at SS. <g>
I came up with this technique for folding aluminum without a brake after learning a similar technique that jewelers use. The grooves in the 1/8" sheet are cut about 1/16" deep with a 90 degree single flute countersink. You can see some cracking on the outside of the bends in the second photo - annealing or a different alloy should take care of that in cases where it matters.
This probably doesn't help much if you need to install internal ribs, but it does make nice boxes.
http://www.suscom-maine.net/~nsimmons/news/Mailbox00.JPG
http://www.suscom-maine.net/~nsimmons/news/Mailbox01.JPG
http://www.suscom-maine.net/~nsimmons/news/Mailbox02.JPG
The jewelry technique involves scoring a piece of sheet by hammering a piece of curved steel wire into the surface of the sheet. You can make interesting 3D shapes in soft metals very easily this way.
--
Ned Simmons

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Neat. Where do you get that single flute counter sink at?
Wes
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Wes wrote:

I would use a router bit.
Nick
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http://www.maford.com/taf/catalog.taf?_function=item&seriesa&_UserReference 65E388273EFE5346B1D6F9
The grooves could also be cut with a regular endmill with the mill head rotated, but the c'sink is much more convenient. You want a small flat at the bottom of the groove to allow some overbend when folding the part to compensate for springback. ___ ________ \ / \_/
--
Ned Simmons

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wrote:

Don, it is a good point, something I did not think about (use of copper as backing for welding butts). At this point I already decided to keep this particular bar, but it is one more reason to.
i
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Copper makes a nice Buss bar for common returns or earth ground. Martin Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Endowment Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
Ignoramus5693 wrote:

-
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