Help on old Delta-Milwaukee surface grinder

I own an ancient Delta-Milwaukee "Toolmaker" surface grinder that is only
used about two hours a year, but it occasionally fills need that nothing
else will perform. It could be 50 years old. Both x, y, and z feeds are
manual. It is fitted with a Brown & Sharpe magnetic chuck. Lately, after
months of idleness, the surface finish after taking only a light 0.002-inch
pass is terrible. I have no operating manual or parts book; can't even find
the serial number.. The brass nameplate says "Only use balanced wheels".
Any suggestions as to a remedy, and who can balance a grinding wheel?
Thanks, Dave Anderson
Reply to
David Anderson
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First of all, if you use coolant make sure you let the wheel run out before you turn it off. If you let coolant on the wheel and dont let it all spin off you will make a heavy side when the stuff runs down and gathers on one side.
Check your belts.
True you wheel with a diamond stone. Rotate the stone so you have a good edge on it.
John
Reply to
John
Is the lube system working? particularly the spindle. If belt driven, are the belts in good shape? When did you last dress the wheel? I'd dress it before every use. I'm no expert, but when you put on a new wheel, you HAVE to dress it to true it up. What's the material you are cutting? Try the same material you used the last time it worked okay. Don't expect the same quality of results if the wheel doesn't match the material. Two thousandths is NOT a light cut! Try some 1/2 thou cuts. or even less.
Pete Stanaitis ---------------------------
David Anders> I own an ancient Delta-Milwaukee "Toolmaker" surface grinder that is only
Reply to
spaco
The spindle bearing is an adjustable taper on those grinders from what I remember. It is possible that someone did not set the bearing right.
Tony
Reply to
Tony
A couple thoughts: First, a 0.002 cut is pretty heavy. Try something on the order of 0.0002 to 0.0005. Second, dress the wheel with a diamond dresser and take off a fairly substantial amount so as to give the wheel a new, sharp, clean surface all the way around. Finally, if the machine doesn't have a coolant system, brush the work with some WD-40 or even wax the wheel.
Jerry
Reply to
Jerry Foster
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I don't believe they are capable of the smoothness of a normal surface grinder due to flex in the bolt-on round column that supports the swivel head. Mine only gives a smooth ripple-free finish if I feed it one division (0.0005") or less and turn the Y feed slowly so left and right passes are slightly diagonal to break up the self-reinforcing washboard-road effect.
Jim Wilkins
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Thanks to all respondents to my question, especially to Jim Wilkins who added a link to download the original Rockwell Operating and Maintenance Instructions (6 pages). I tried the first suggestion to dress the wheel with a diamond tip, and the finish improved 200% with no washboard. I will study the manufacturers pages for additional help. Again, thank you all. David Anderson, Cedar Hill, TX
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Reply to
David Anderson

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