Hillbilly Engineering

wrote:


Thanks. I have some of those old tools like an adze, froe and drawknife but I've found I can do a better job faster with a medium sized chainsaw (Stihl MS211). For instance a log can be flattened by sliding the back side of the chain along it and controlling depth of cut by the tilt. A beam can be press-fitted into a tree-trunk post by positioning it on blocks of 2x4 clamped to the post, clamping another block snugly above it when it's in place, removing the beam and using the blocks to guide a handsaw to cut the ends of the notch. The chainsaw removes most of the wood in between, until the rest can be chiseled. The post at the other end is the visual guide for flattening the face of the post first.
In Jr High shop class I learned how to freehand grind a wood plane blade square enough to pass the teacher's try square test. He was a retired Swedish cabinet maker who really knew the old ways very well. My father was restoring an 1830ish mansion and my friend's father was building a wooden sailboat, so we had incentives to learn.
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On Thu, 12 Sep 2019 11:11:02 -0400
<snip>

Oh for sure but the hand tools don't need tuneups, gas and other than some cussing run pretty quiet :)
Nowadays it's hard to find info on using, maintaining and even buying hand tools like they are using to build/maintain trails in protected areas. A good crosscut saw will cost you more than a run-of-the-mill chainsaw...
I go for the hybrid approach myself. I mix and match new and old tech to get the job done as needed.
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Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI
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On Thu, 12 Sep 2019 17:29:55 -0400
<snip>

I have a couple one-man cross cut saws. The best of the two needs some new teeth and/or material welded in place. Works well up to around 15 inch diameter. After that it tracks off to the side and will eventually bind up. And yes I have all the sharpening tools and info on how it is suppose to be done. Think the missing teeth cause more trouble than you would expect though. Both saws have seen a lot of use through the years. Maybe someday I'll grit my teeth, find some ambition and get serious about fixing them...
A 30 inch Bow Saw works good up to 6 inches or so. The thin blade is a real plus.

Oh, I was right on that from your earlier post and initial impression. Ran around down that rabbit hole for several hours. Can't believe how much the Stihl those try to copy sell for $$$. Post a follow up after you have some more time with it if you can. I have a lot of respect for your reviews and thoughts on stuff :)
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Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI
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wrote:

I keep bow saws in the tool shed in the woods and still use them for quick jobs, rather than going back to the house to gas up and carry back a chainsaw. Home Depot had replacement bow saw blades on sale cheap so I bought 5, then discovered they were crudely sharpened so I jointed and filed all of them. The neighbors have commented on how fast they cut.
My father cleared another relative's field with a "misery whip" for room, board and $5 when he was young. He taught me how to use ours and fired my interest in buying a chainsaw instead, actually a peach basket with two broken ones that combined into one that worked.
When I visited Alabama and saw the cleared field, said relative was still driving a 1935 pickup truck with dents on every single inch of it. But the engine and the oil were clean. I doubt that Snag is from any further back in the holler than the Wilkins clan. We started in 1619 as Virginia plantation owners but made the mistake of moving westward into the (cooler) mountains.

It's supposedly a simplified near-copy of the Japanese Zenoah G2500. https://www.zenoah.com/int/products/chainsaws/g2500t-ops/966011601/
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On Fri, 13 Sep 2019 10:15:42 -0400
<snip>

Yeah, still have an old blade on the 30 inch bow saw that I suspect will outperform many of the new. That is if you can even find a replacement 30 inch. I can online but it would be nice to look it over first, see if it looks usable and/or can be made usable...

I have a couple two man versions too but not worth the trouble getting them sharpened up. Kinda hard to use by yourself. You would not believe how many people stopped and offered the use of their chainsaw when I cut up the big spruce in front that blew over. The look on their faces was something when I told them I had three chainsaws but preferred doing it by hand :)

Dad's old farm he grew up on is now a housing project :(
I have a brush scythe (new, aluminum handle) and the old grass scythe my Dad used. He would have liked this aluminum one with the brush blade. Works quite well for clearing weeds and light brush, brambles. Cost me ~$110. You don't find those in the big box stores...

They do look quite similar. It may have been this I was thinking of:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
They mention it the description that parts are swappable with certain Stihl models. I looked at quite a few, curiosity after your original post awhile back.
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Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI
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On Thu, 12 Sep 2019 17:29:55 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

Condolences on buying one of those. For $20 less, you can get a proven 14" Remington (fair quality) which won't be much heavier, and it includes a bar and chain (another $20 for the Farmertec goods). Good luck finding parts for a Farmertec.
--
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crazy people would get off fewer shots.
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On Sun, 15 Sep 2019 10:14:48 -0700, Larry Jaques

Paying too little for something is always a greater risk than paying too much - - - -
That said - - - I've gotten over 20 years out of a used Remington I paid $30 for. It is getting old enough that finding parts is likely to be getting more difficult but I haven't needed much. If it doesn't work I have an old Partner I paid $15 for at a yard sale.
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wrote:

I've had less trouble from cheaper saws than from my Husqvarna and Stihl, probably because I work them much harder.
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On 9/15/2019 5:27 PM, Jim Wilkins wrote:

one I paid 75 bucks for . Guess which one gives the most trouble ? The Poulan that I bought - probably 15 years ago now - used at a pawn shop . The free Stihl 025(16") is my best cutter , it has a new aftermarket engine now because I wore the original the rest of the way out . The Homelite (14") has never been touched except bars and chain , finicky to start the first time but runs great after that . The Poulan (18") won't start ... fuel delivery problems , maybe needs new fuel lines (again) . I haven't really needed it lately so haven't taken the time to diagnose .
--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
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On 9/18/2019 7:44 AM, Terry Coombs wrote:

That's a curious concept - a new engine for a chain saw. I mean, the engine IS the chain saw, with a couple of attachments. Whatever works for you.
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On 9/18/2019 11:37 AM, Bob Engelhardt wrote:



there are a lot of other things that make up a chainsaw . OBTW , that motor cost me less than 40 bucks . A new saw comparable to mine runs (right now , on sale) for 3 bills . A couple of weeks ago the drive sprocket shit the bed . Cost me almost as much as I paid for the motor - thru the local only-game-in-town Stihl dealer - for the parts to repair it . Should I have bought that new $300 saw this time too ? And I gotta tell ya , that saw runs like a fornicated primate now . Go ahead and throw your money away on new junk , I'll keep repairing my old quality tools as long as I can buy or make parts (the bottom front isolation mount has parts I machined in my shop to replace worn out originals) to repair it . I sharpen my own chains too ... this is why I have a machine shop !
replacing the 2.73's in the '86 GMC 1500 .
--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
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The Permatex is like modeling clay or chewing gum, stiff enough as mixed to bridge over the hole without support. I was concerned that it might not conform as tightly to the edges of the hole and seal as well as a more fluid epoxy, but it hasn't leaked.
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In the 60s I used Permatex Hi-Tack -- candy-apple-red gasket sealant in an aerosol can -- to seal gasoline-exposed joints. It was great for that purpose. Gas wouldn't cut it, had to use lacquer thinner to clean it up.
Left the automotive trade. Fast forward to circa 2004. Sealed a glass gas filter float bowl with it. Leaked like a sieve. Various tests showed it was easily soluble in gasoline.
The Permatex engineers were unable to help, even sent me a free can of their Candy Apple Spritz in case mine was uniquely defective. No better.
Anybody know if Permatex has changed the formulation? Or if there are now additives/components in gas (as sold in Atlantic Canada), ones not present in the 60s, that would explain this? Exactly what has changed?
Vexed that my favorite, gold-standard gasket sealer isn't any more.
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada

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On 21 Sep 2019 15:06:26 -0300
<snip>

Suspect it has ethanol added. You may be able to find gas without it using this website:
https://www.pure-gas.org/
As you probably already know it is hard on older gaskets and such that were not made for it...
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Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI
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https://www.cbc.ca/marketplace/blog/pump-facts "most grades of Petro-Canada fuel may now contain up to 10% ethanol."

This is what I used: (Amazon.com product link shortened) The package doesn't warn against use on plastic tanks. Hardly anything bonds to polyethylene.
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On 21/09/2019 19:39, Jim Wilkins wrote:

I used some 3M 4693H recently to bond a couple of pieces of polyethylene together so they formed a large enough piece to machine the final item, worked fine and no special prep other than making sure the surfaces were clean. The material was slightly rubbery when dried. I have seen some adhesives require plasma or flame treatment of the surface to activate it so the adhesive would stick, none required with the 4693H. No idea about petrol tolerance but it seemed to be a solvent based adhesive so it might be an issue.
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The repair kit for my polyethylene Coleman canoe has some kind of expensive 3M industrial adhesive in it, maybe that one. After a canoe shop quoted me the price I stopped treating the canoe as indestructible.
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On 21/09/2019 21:30, Jim Wilkins wrote:

Some PE and PP can be welded with hot air, I had a broken component and V'd out the break and used a small butane soldering iron/hot gas source and welded the part much like OA and used strips from a PP milk bottle
years. Another try on a different grade of material got no where so I gave up, it just seemed to soften and char but wasn't playing ball, maybe better kit would have helped, maybe not, I don't know. At least one attempt came out OK.
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On 21 Sep 2019 15:06:26 -0300, Mike Spencer

To the best of my knowledge, the motor fuel of today bears little resemblance to the gasoline of fifty years ago. The top end Shell product claims to be ethanol free and is the only fuel I will use in my antique mechanical sheep.
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