how to keep brake cylinders from rusting?

ok, this really is metal related, right? I've got a car I'm parting out (an 87 porsche 944S if that matters to anyone) - and the brake master cylinder,
and clutch master and slave cylinder are in good condition - If I just put them aside, they will be worthless in a year because the brake fluid is hydroscopic and I'll just have a corroded mess. I could pump a little DoT 5 fluid (a silicone oil) through them, but I'm not convinced that will really stop the corrosion because some of the dot 3/4 fluid may remain to cause trouble. I can disassemble, but then they will probably not work right upon reassembly (and kits are not generally available at a reasonable price).
There must be some reasonable way to protect these cylinders during storage - any suggestions?
--
bill
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William Noble wrote:

Zip-bag with silica gel?
Nick
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and flush them through with fresh fluid first?
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William Noble wrote:

You could try putting them in plastic bags or containers and drawing a vacuum on them. Maybe even put some dessicant bags in with them to absorb any moisture that might remain.
Jim Chandler
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On Mon, 21 May 2007 23:24:36 -0700, "William Noble"

Flush with new fluid, then put in a container backfilled with argon from the TIG. Welding gas is very dry. Ziplock bags are better than nothing, but polyethylene is slightly permeable to water vapor. I like those cheap 1-gallon styrene or PET wide-jars with screw-top lids found at Wal-Mart.
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wrote:

Just about any plastic is permeable to water- that is why homebrewers use glass for lagering (slow fermentation).
-Carl
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On a related note, why can't we make functional copies of said cylinders out of stainless? Is there a good reason the OEM parts aren't, other than the 27 cents each of cost savings?
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The extra $5 each in machining costs.
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Anthony

You can't 'idiot proof' anything....every time you try, they just make
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I have had some cylindes on one of my older cars sleeved with brass - by a company called "white post restorations" - good folks, by the way - they said that SS was too hard and would not form a good seal. I've seen a service to sleeve older Corvette calipers with SS, but not drum brake cylinders or master cylinders.
SS is also brittle sometimes, that may be part of the problem.


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